GOTHIC ROOM DECORATIONS. ROOM DECORATIONS

Gothic Room Decorations. Discount Wall Art And Decor

Gothic Room Decorations


gothic room decorations
    decorations
  • A thing that serves as an ornament
  • Ornamentation
  • (decorate) make more attractive by adding ornament, colour, etc.; "Decorate the room for the party"; "beautify yourself for the special day"
  • The process or art of decorating or adorning something
  • (decorate) deck: be beautiful to look at; "Flowers adorned the tables everywhere"
  • (decorate) award a mark of honor, such as a medal, to; "He was decorated for his services in the military"
    gothic
  • Belonging to or redolent of the Dark Ages; portentously gloomy or horrifying
  • characteristic of the style of type commonly used for printing German
  • extinct East Germanic language of the ancient Goths; the only surviving record being fragments of a 4th-century translation of the Bible by Bishop Ulfilas
  • Of or in the style of architecture prevalent in western Europe in the 12th–16th centuries, characterized by pointed arches, rib vaults, and flying buttresses, together with large windows and elaborate tracery
  • of or relating to the language of the ancient Goths; "the Gothic Bible translation"
  • Of or relating to the Goths or their extinct East Germanic language, which provides the earliest manuscript evidence of any Germanic language (4th–6th centuries ad)
    room
  • Space that can be occupied or where something can be done, esp. viewed in terms of whether there is enough
  • Opportunity or scope for something to happen or be done, esp. without causing trouble or damage
  • A part or division of a building enclosed by walls, floor, and ceiling
  • board: live and take one's meals at or in; "she rooms in an old boarding house"
  • space for movement; "room to pass"; "make way for"; "hardly enough elbow room to turn around"
  • an area within a building enclosed by walls and floor and ceiling; "the rooms were very small but they had a nice view"
gothic room decorations - Wallmonkeys Peel
Wallmonkeys Peel and Stick Wall Graphic - Gothic Table - 36"H x 24"W
Wallmonkeys Peel and Stick Wall Graphic - Gothic Table - 36"H x 24"W
WallMonkeys wall graphics are printed on the highest quality re-positionable, self-adhesive fabric paper. Each order is printed in-house and on-demand. WallMonkeys uses premium materials & state-of-the-art production technologies. Our white fabric material is superior to vinyl decals. You can literally see and feel the difference. Our wall graphics apply in minutes and won't damage your paint or leave any mess. PLEASE double check the size of the image you are ordering prior to clicking the 'ADD TO CART' button. Our graphics are offered in a variety of sizes and prices.
WallMonkeys are intended for indoor use only.
Printed on-demand in the United States Your order will ship within 3 business days, often sooner. Some orders require the full 3 days to allow dark colors and inks to fully dry prior to shipping. Quality is worth waiting an extra day for!
Removable and will not leave a mark on your walls.
'Fotolia' trademark will be removed when printed.
Our catalog of over 10 million images is perfect for virtually any use: school projects, trade shows, teachers classrooms, colleges, nurseries, college dorms, event planners, and corporations of all size.

76% (16)
Theodore H. and Elizabeth J. De Hart House
Theodore H. and Elizabeth J. De Hart House
134 Main Street, Tottenville, Staten Island The Theodore F. and Elizabeth J. De Hart House, built ca. 1850, is a rare survivor of early Tottenville, an important 19th-century town on Staten Island’s South Shore. This vernacular clapboard cottage merges older local building traditions with newer Greek and Gothic Revival modes. Its doorway is an excellent example of the Greek Revival style, while the curvilinear bargeboards are expressions of the Gothic Revival. The richly ornamented 1870s front porch (which probably replaced an earlier porch) features articulated carved posts, cutwork spandrels and an exuberant railing. The entire house is substantially intact. Sharing architectural forms with other Tottenville houses, this is one of the best-preserved houses representing South Shore Staten Island’s early building traditions. Through its succession of owners, the house has close ties to the oyster business which created the town of Tottenville. It was built as an investment on the newly laid-out Totten Street (later called Main Street) by Henry Butler, of a Tottenville family whose ferrymen and millers went back several generations. Three years later it was owned by William H. B. Totten, a grocer, and four years after that by Joseph W. Totten, a partner in an oyster-opening firm. Theodore F. De Hart, an oyster planter, was the owner of longest duration, from 1874 to 1913. 134 Main Street is one of the two oldest houses on this important Tottenville street. DESCRIPTION AND ANALYSIS Tottenville Tottenville is located on the shore of the Arthur Kill near Ward’s Point, the southwestern tip of Staten Island and the southernmost point in New York City and New York State. Far from the urban culture of Manhattan, Tottenville remains a small isolated village. Across the Arthur Kill lies the city of Perth Amboy, New Jersey. South of Ward’s Point is the Raritan Bay. The village of Tottenville came into being around 1840. Its economy and culture arose from oyster fishing, shipbuilding and ship repair, and agriculture. Its trade routes with New Jersey and New York City linked it to the metropolitan region and the greater world. It became the largest town in Westfield, the historic name for this quarter of Staten Island. Even today, though encroached upon by modern suburban culture, the feeling of a small coastal town prevails with characteristics unlike any other place on Staten Island. Tottenville residents prize their isolated location. Before There Was Tottenville Long before Europeans arrived in the New World, Native Americans of the Lenni Lenape group of the Delaware Nation were attracted to the beauty of the elevated shoreline and the abundance of oysters growing in the Arthur Kill and Raritan Bay. Major archaeological evidence of their encampments and burial grounds has been found on Ward’s Point. By 1670 the Lenape had sold their land to European colonists and had departed from Staten Island. Christopher Billopp, an Englishman, was the first European to settle in the area. He arrived in New York harbor with Major Edmund Andros in 1674. Andros became the Royal Governor of New York and Billopp, an officer in the British navy, was commissioned Lieutenant. In 1677 Billopp laid claim to 932 acres on Staten Island, soon thereafter building an imposing two-story stone house on the shore overlooking Perth Amboy. In 1687 he was given a royal charter for 1600 acres (including the original 932 acres) and made Lord of the Manor of Bentley. The manor would include today’s Tottenville, Richmond Valley, Pleasant Plains and part of Prince’s Bay. Although Billopp stayed on Staten Island only intermittently, his wife apparently lived in the manor house and his land was improved for farming. His grandson Thomas Farmar, who changed his surname to Billopp, inherited the manor in 1732 and lived there full time. Thomas’s son Christopher Billopp (1732-1827) lived in the stone house through much of the American Revolution (known as Conference House, a designated New York City landmark). During his ownership the house was plundered both by Hessian soldiers and American patriots and Christopher sought refuge in his father-in-law’s house nearby. The Billopp House was the meeting place for the Peace Conference held on Sept. 11, 1776. John Adams, Benjamin Franklin, and Edward Rutledge met with Lord Howe. The conference was unsuccessful and the war continued. In 1782, Christopher Billopp began to sell portions of the manor. Among the buyers were members of the Totten family. In 1783 Billopp left Staten Island. Sixty years later, this area would become the village of Tottenville. The Totten Family John Totten (d. 1785), a weaver, was probably the first Totten to settle on Staten Island. In 1767 he purchased land on Prince’s Bay from the executors of Thomas Billopp. Local historians Charles Leng and William T. Davis say that he was an Englishman, who came to Staten Island from Westchester County. Gilbert Totten (ca. 1740-1
The Early Gothic Room: Window with Gisaille Decorations: Panel
The Early Gothic Room:  Window with Gisaille Decorations: Panel
Window with Gisaille Decorations: Panel France, Normandy, Rouen, about 1320-1330 Form the choir of the abbey church of Saint-Ouen The five panels of this lancet window once decorated three different windows in the radiating chapels of the abbey church of Saint-Ouen at Rouen, in Normandy. As reassembled here, the lancet is only one-third its original height. Grisaille glass, which is colorless and translucent, was a popular glazing device in the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries. It not only allows more light into the interior than color-saturated pot-metal glass, grisaille also functions as an unobtrusive background for ornamental motifs painted with fine brush lines. Our glass panels are decorated with stylized yet recognizable plants such as periwinkle, strawberry, and artemisia, forming an elegant network of foliate motifs. The central bosses of the panels are richly colored with deep blue, red, yellow, and green. The bosses would have echoed the brilliantly hued horizontal bands once located at the windows' midpoints, which contained scenes from the life of the saint to whom the chapel was dedicated.

gothic room decorations
gothic room decorations
Wallmonkeys Peel and Stick Wall Graphic - Gothic Culture - Scene - 24"W x 16"H
WallMonkeys wall graphics are printed on the highest quality re-positionable, self-adhesive fabric paper. Each order is printed in-house and on-demand. WallMonkeys uses premium materials & state-of-the-art production technologies. Our white fabric material is superior to vinyl decals. You can literally see and feel the difference. Our wall graphics apply in minutes and won't damage your paint or leave any mess. PLEASE double check the size of the image you are ordering prior to clicking the 'ADD TO CART' button. Our graphics are offered in a variety of sizes and prices.
WallMonkeys are intended for indoor use only.
Printed on-demand in the United States Your order will ship within 3 business days, often sooner. Some orders require the full 3 days to allow dark colors and inks to fully dry prior to shipping. Quality is worth waiting an extra day for!
Removable and will not leave a mark on your walls.
'Fotolia' trademark will be removed when printed.
Our catalog of over 10 million images is perfect for virtually any use: school projects, trade shows, teachers classrooms, colleges, nurseries, college dorms, event planners, and corporations of all size.

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