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    Bio-Terror Scares (2003)

    BIOTERRORBIBLE.COM: The following bio-terror scares occurred within the calendar year of 2003. While some of the following reports may have been legitimate cases, most if not all of them appear to be generated man-made scares with the overall goal of convincing American and the world that it is on the precipice of a major pandemic. The fact that these bio-terror scares exist in mass confirms that an upcoming bio-terror attack is in the cards and may be played in a last ditch effort to regain political, economic and militarial control of society.

    Title: Postal Service Reports New Anthrax Scare In D.C
    Date:
    January 15, 2003
    Source:
    UCLA

    Abstract: The Federal Reserve on Tuesday reported a positive initial test for the deadly anthrax bacteria at the center that checks incoming mail for such threats, the U.S. Postal Service said.

    "We have a single test result from one sample out of many that are done over at the Federal Reserve," Tom Day, vice president of engineering for the U.S. Postal Service, told a news conference.

    "This appears to be a very isolated incident and it is not clear at all specifically what, if any, piece of mail this came from," Day said.

    "The Federal Reserve routinely tests mail delivered to its headquarters in Washington in a secure facility," he said, adding that the suspect item did not enter the headquarters building.

    A spokesman for the Federal Reserve confirmed that a letter addressed to Fed Vice Chairman Roger Ferguson tested positive for the deadly anthrax bacteria in three preliminary tests and said it was being sent on Wednesday to the Centers for Disease Control in Atlanta for further examination.

    In the weeks following the Sept. 11 attacks on America in 2001, several letters containing anthrax spores were mailed through a New Jersey postal center to news media offices in Washington, New York and Florida.

    Five people, including two Postal workers who worked at Brentwood mail facility in Washington, died and 23 others were made ill.

    Anthrax-laced letters were also sent to the offices of Senate Minority Leader Tom Daschle and Vermont Sen. Patrick Leahy, both Democrats.

    No arrests have been made despite a $2.5 million reward. Law enforcement agencies said they suspected the anthrax mailings were the work of a disaffected individual, and not of a network like al Qaeda, accused of carrying out the Sept. 11 attacks.

    First Test On January 3, 2003
    The Federal Reserve spokesman, who asked not to be identified, said the Fed alerted the U.S. Postal Service to the test results on Tuesday afternoon.

    He said initial tests on the suspect letter conducted on Jan 3. and again on Jan. 6 indicated the possibility of the presence of anthrax. As a result, the mail was sent to a laboratory for further testing which found a "presumptive indication" of anthrax.

    "We have a single test result from one sample out of many that are done over at the Federal Reserve," said Day, the U.S. postal official.

    "The Federal Reserve routinely tests mail delivered to its headquarters in Washington in a secure facility," he said, adding that the suspect item did not enter the headquarters building.

    All mail sent to Federal Reserve is tested for the possibility of anthrax in two trailers located near the Fed.

    Twice since Sept. 11, 2001, the Fed has reported a positive initial test result for anthrax, though later tests have proved negative.

    "There have been false positives," Day said on Tuesday. "Unfortunately, I believe the Federal Reserve has experienced some of that. But when you get a lab result that gives you a preliminary positive, you've got to take that seriously."

    Day said the Postal Service was now performing precautionary tests for anthrax at the Washington mail facility which handles mail going to the Federal Reserve.

    He said there was no evidence of broad contamination or of risk to employees at the mail facility. "There's absolutely nothing that indicates we have a contamination problem here," he said.

    The Postal Service said it expected results of the tests at its facility early on Wednesday (UCLA, 2002).