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Bio-Terror Plots & Patsies (2010)

BIOTERRORBIBLE.COM: Despite the number of high-profile bio-terror plots and patsies, the historical record indicates that 99% of all bio-terror plots, attacks, “tests”, “accidents” and drills are conducted by the government who has the means, the motive and the opportunity.

Title: Denver Man Arrested For Mailing White Powder To Senators And Representatives
Date:
March 2, 2010
Source:
Bio Prep Watch

Abstract: A Denver man suspected of mailing white powder to Colorado and Alabama senators and representatives has been arrested by the FBI.

Jay DeVaughn, who is also alleged to have threatened Argentinian diplomats, was charged with mailing threatening communication. More charges are expected.

Devaughn, who works at Community College of Aurora as a librarian, is also accused of sending the harmless white powder to the offices of Sen. Mark Udall, Sen. Micahael Bennet, Rep. Mike Coffman and Rep. Diana DeGette. DeVaughn is also suspected of sending numerous Alabama senators and representatives letters filled with white powder.

The current charges are a result of a letter sent to Jill Karber that contained the threat, "Jill Karber RIP."

Nathan Karber, the wife of Jill Karber, was the name DeVaughn used as the return addressee on the letters to Bennet, Udall, DeGette and Coffman.

DeVaughn was described by the president of Community College of Aurora as well respected, according to The Denver post. President Linda Bowman went on to say that DevAughn is a good employee but noted that he has been placed on unpaid leave pending the investigation’s outcome.

Bowman also revealed that a background check performed for the university by a national firm upon hiring DeVaughn came back clean (Bio Prep Watch, 2010).

Title: English Man Pleads Guilty To Ricin Possession
Date: March 9, 2010
Source: Bio Prep Watch


Abstract: A white supremacist in England has pleaded guilty to the production of the deadly poison ricin for use in acts of terrorism.

Ian Davison, a truck driver, and his teenage son Nicky were arrested in northern England in June. According to police, traces of ricin were found in a jam jar in the kitchen of Davison’s home.

In pleading guilty on Monday at Newcastle Crown County to the production of a chemical weapon, Davison also admitted three charges of possessing a record containing information that was likely to be useful to a person committing or preparing acts of terrorism.

The three possession charges pertain to possession of The Anarchist’s Handbook, Kitchen Complete and Mudgahein’s Explosives Handbook. The three books all contain information and instructions on the production and use of explosives.

Davison also admitted to the possession of a prohibited weapon in relation to the a spray canister found during the search of his residence.

Sentencing for Davison has been delayed until after the trial of his teenage son, who is currently scheduled to be tried on April 12 for two charges of possessing material that contains information likely to be useful to a person preparing or committing acts of terrorism (Bio Prep Watch, 2010).

Title: Alabama Man Sentenced For Anthrax Hoax
Date: April 22, 2010
Source:
Bio Prep Watch

Abstract: A Haleyville, Alabama man has been sentenced by a federal judge to seven months in prison for sending a letter filled with white powder and photos of the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks to the Social Security Administration in Cullman.

Patrick Bryant Wilson, in addition to the seven month sentence, was also sentenced by U.S. District Judge Karon Bowdre to three years of supervised release and seven months of home confinement.

Wilson entered a plea agreement in December with the government.

Before the sentence was handed down, Judge Bowdre noted that Wilson’s threats caused terror even though they did not cause physical harm. Such threats, Judge Bowdre said, are on the rise.

"People need to understand these are not silly, adolescent pranks," Judge Bowdrew said according to The Birmingham News. "They have very serious consequences for the individuals that receive them."

According to the December plea agreement, Wilson took a letter to the Cullman post office on Aug. 25 addressed to the Social Security Administration. Wilson’s home was listed as the return address.

A postal worker saw that the letter was leaking white powder that was later determine to be baby powder. The letter also included two photos of the Twin Towers in flames.

Wilson’s attorney, Don Colee, said that Wilson had applied for disability and was denied. Wilson was also unemployed at the time after losing his job as a regional manager when he got hurt.

"He became frustrated dealing with Social Security Disability Office and acted as he reflected in a ‘stupid’ manner by not only mailing the matters in the envelope but also making several phone calls as well," Colee said in a court filing (Bio Prep Watch, 2010).

Title: Alabama Men Indicted For Multiple Anthrax Threats
Date: April 29, 2010
Source:
Bio Prep Watch

Abstract: Two Alabama men were indicted on Wednesday by a federal grand jury in connection with a series of anthrax hoax letters mailed in Alabama this month and in March.

Clifton Lamar "Cliff" Dodd was charged with mailing 15 hoax letters between March 6 and April 5. The letters allegedly contained a threat in the form of white powder.

One of Dodd’s letters was sent to U.S. Sen. Richard Shelby’s office in Birmingham, Alabama’s Robert S. Vance Federal Building on March 8. Other recipients of the hoax letters from Dodd include Alabama Sen. Jim Preuitt of Talladega, two Talladega County state court judges, Talladega County Sheriff Jerry Studdard, two inmates of the Talladega County Jail when Dodd served time, a Lincoln and Oxford police department investigators who had previously interviewed Dodd.

Dodd and Milstead Earl "Mickey" Darden were charged with eight other counts of mailing hoax anthrax letters on April 24.

A 24th indictment charges Dodd and Darden with conspiring to send threatening hoax letters that were mailed April 24. Dodd and Darden were arrested by postal inspectors on April 24 after depositing eight letters in an outdoor drop box at the Pell City Post Office. Those eight letters were found to contain white powder, the arrest affidavit says.

The indictment alleges that Darden allowed Dodd to assemble the eight letters while sitting in Darden’s car. Darden is also alleged to have driven Dodd to the Pell City Post Office to mail them (Bio Prep Watch, 2010).

Title: Man Claims Anthrax Scare Was His Retirement Plan
Date: May 10, 2010
Source:
Bio Prep Watch

Abstract: A transient is scheduled to be arraigned this week on a 10-count indictment charging him with anthrax hoaxes, threatening communications, making a threat against the president and failing to register as a sex offender.

A federal grand jury returned a 10-count indictment charging Timothy Cloud, a transient generally from Roseville and San Francisco, with four counts of hoax mailings, four counts of mailing threatening communications, one count of threatening the President and one count of crossing state lines after failing to register as a sex offender.

In a statement written by Cloud last month for two federal agents, he admitted mailing menacing messages scrawled on 3-by-5 cards, along with talcum powder, from Roseville, California, to President Barack Obama at the White House and to Social Security Administration offices in New York City, Kansas City, Mo., and Baltimore.

“I mailed the envelopes…to those addresses because I hoped people would think it was anthrax," he wrote, Sacbee.com reports. "I mailed the letters because I was mad. I knew I would be caught…I do not regret sending the envelopes because that was my retirement plan. Either I was going to get Social Security or I was going to jail."

This case is the product of an investigation by the Social Security Administration’s Office of Inspector General, the U.S. Secret Service, the Postal Inspection Service and the Federal Bureau of Investigation. Assistant United States Attorney Matthew Stegman prosecuted the case.

According to court documents, on January 30, 2010, Cloud sent envelopes addressed to Social Security Administration offices in New York, Kansas City, Mo., and Baltimore. Each contained a white powdery substance and an index card with the words “you stole my money” and “die.” Police, fire and hazardous material teams responded to emergency calls at each location and employees had to be quarantined and affected areas decontaminated.

The indictment alleges that a similar envelope was mailed the same day to the White House with the words, “You are just another lying politision [sic]," with cross hairs between “not this time” and “maybe next time,” and a newspaper photo of President Obama with cross hairs hand drawn over his face. The indictment also alleges that Cloud failed to register in California as a sex offender by reason of a conviction in Texas.

Cloud was arrested in San Francisco on April 22.

If convicted, Cloud faces up to five years in prison and a $250,000 fine on each of count of sending the hoax mailings and threats to the President. He faces a statutory maximum of 10 years in prison and a $250,000 fine on each count of sending threatening communications (Bio Prep Watch, 2010).

Title: Alabama Man Pleads Guilty To Anthrax Hoax
Date: June 29, 2010
Source:
Bio Prep Watch

Abstract: An Alabama man has pleaded guilty in U.S. District Court to conspiracy to mail hoax anthrax letters.

NBC13.com reports that Milstead Earl "Mickey" Darden admitted to U.S. District Judge Abdul Kallon that he conspired with Clifton lamar "Cliff" Dodd to mail eight threatening letters on April 24.

Both Darden and Dodd were arrested by U.S. postal inspectors shortly after the eight letters were deposited in a Pell City Post Office drop box. The letters all contained white powder that, after testing, was revealed to not be anthrax.

“These type letters are a threat, not a joke,” U.S. Attorney Joyce White Vance told NBC13.com. “When people open or handle letters containing white powder, they fear for their health and must endure medical precautions against poisonous contaminants. The emergency response and required testing on every potentially harmful letter is costly,” she said. “These cases will be prosecuted.”

In his plea agreement, Darden acknowledged to the court that he allowed Dodd to prepare and address the powder containing letters in Darden’s truck in the parking lot of a Pell City, Ala., store. Darden then drove Dodd to the post office, where Dodd put the letters into a drop box.

“Tampering with U.S. mail is a serious offense and sending hoax letters to scare postal customers is something that cannot be tolerated,” U.S. Postal Inspection Service Inspector in Charge Martin Phanco said, NBC13.com reports. “Because of the disruption to mail service that such letters cause, the penalties can be just as severe as if they had sent something hazardous.”

Sentencing is set for October 13. The maximum penalty for conspiracy to mail hoax anthrax letters is five years in prison and a $250,000 fine (Bio Prep Watch, 2010).

Title: Colorado Man To Plead Guilty To Anthrax Hoax
Date: July 21, 2010
Source:
Bio Prep Watch

Abstract: Jay DeVaughn, the man arrested for allegedly sending white powder to a series of congressmen and government offices, will reportedly plead guilty to related charges in Alabama and Colorado.

DeVaughn already pleaded not guilty, but will have a change of plea hearing, to federal charges in Colorado that include mailing threatening communications and false information and hoaxes, 9News.com reports. Alabama federal courts have also charged him with one count of false information and hoaxes. These cases have been combined.

"He is expected to plead guilty," U.S. Attorney spokesman Jeff Dorschner told 9News.com. “Details of the plea agreement will not be made available until after the change of plea hearing."

The change of plea hearing, expected to take place on July 22, had been postponed for one month.

Birmingham FBI agents investigated a total of 12 letters containing white powder that were mailed from Alabama to the offices of Alabama senators and representatives in 2009. DeVaughn also allegedly sent white powder to the offices of government officials from Colorado, though it is unclear whether they were mailed to addresses within the state or to Washington, DC.

The return addresses used on the mailings were often those of people DeVaughn had allegedly threatened over the phone in the Denver metropolitan area, including his high school trigonometry teacher.

DeVaughn was voted the administrator of the year in 2009 at the community college he worked for in Aurora, Colorado. He was the director of library services until he resigned shortly after his arrest earlier this year (Bio Prep Watch, 2010).

Title: Scottish Man Behind Bomb And Biothreats Sentenced To Prison
Date: July 26, 2010
Source: Bio Prep Watch


Abstract: A Scottish man claiming he was from the Scottish Liberation Army was recently sentenced to four years for sending two hoax bomb e-mail threats to Heathrow Airport.

Adam Bubsy, 61, was convicted by a jury last month and has been in custody, as Judge Desmond Hogan considered the crime a serious offense, IrishTimes.com reports.

Other terrorism threats claiming to originate from the Scottish Liberation Army, including bioterror threats against Manchester’s water supply and vodka bottles containing caustic soda sent to politicians and journalists in England, have originated in Ireland since Busby came to the country, the court heard during Busby’s trial.

Det. Supt. Diarmuid O’Sullivan told IrishTimes.com that e-mails made threats against specific flights and named their flight numbers. Air security services decided, however, that no action needed to be taken as the threat was not credible.

Investigators traced the e-mails back to a Dublin public library in Charleville Mall which Busby frequented, according to the report.

Busby has had a relatively long track record of making such threats.

He was convicted 13 years ago after he made threatening phone threats to Scottish media organizations. Busby pleaded not guilty at Dublin Circuit Criminal Court to two counts of sending hoax messages for the purpose of causing annoyance, inconvenience or needless anxiety, at Charleville Mall Public Library, North Strand, on May 8 and 15, 2006.

Busby, who suffers from chronic multiple sclerosis, came to Ireland in 1980 after he was charged with criminal damage on the property of the English Ministry of Defense. Busby has numerous previous convictions in Scotland but these were all for minor offenses, such as breaching the peace, according to IrishTimes.com (Bio Prep Watch, 2010).

Title: Transient Sentenced For Anthrax Hoax Letter Campaign
Date: August 24, 2010
Source:
Bio Prep Watch

Abstract: Timothy Cloud, a 63-year-old transient man, has been sentenced to 20 years in prison for his part in an anthrax hoax letter campaign, threatening President Obama and failing to register as a sex offender.

In his plea agreement, Newsroom America reports, Cloud admitted to sending hoax mailings to offices of the Social Security Administration in Baltimore, Kansas City and New York. All employees at the New York office were evacuated with four of them quarantined after that office received one of Cloud’s letters.

Cloud’s hoax letters contained a white powdery substance meant to simulate anthrax. The letters also contained an index card with the words "you stole my money" and "die," Newsroom America reports.

Additionally, Cloud also admitted to sending President Obama a letter containing a white powder and an index cad that had the words "You are just another lying politision [sic]." The letter also had cross hairs between the words "not this time" and "maybe next time," Newsroom America reports, and a photo of President Obama with cross hairs drawn over his face.

Cloud, as a result of a Texas conviction, also admitted that he was required in California to register as a sex offender, which he failed to do.

Cloud, in addition to his 20 year prison sentence, must serve a 10 year period of supervised release upon his release from prison (Bio Prep Watch, 2010).

Title: Man Charged For Sending 50 Anthrax Hoax And Bomb Threat Letters
Date: September 24, 2010
Source:
Bio Prep Watch

Abstract: Federal authorities have announced that a man has been charged with sending more than 50 anthrax hoax and bomb threat letters to government officials and buildings.

A spokesman for the Department of Justice told CNN that a complaint charging Roland Prejean of Thomaston, Conn., was unsealed this week.

Prejean was charged with mailing threatening communications and with making threats through the mail to kill, injure or intimidate a person, or to damage or destroy any building by means of an explosive.

David Fein, the U.S. attorney for the District of Connecticut, told CNN that Prejean has been in custody since he surrendered to authorities in North Dakota on September 7.

“This defendant is alleged to have sent more than 50 letters nationwide, in which he threatened to kill numerous victims, by shooting them, bombing the buildings in which they work or exposing them to a substance that he claimed was, but was not, anthrax,” Fein told CNN.

Prejean allegedly began writing the letters in early September. Recipients included a private individual, a Connecticut probation officer and a Connecticut Superior Court judge, authorities said.

Prejean also allegedly threatened to kill several people, including a postal carrier, judges in Utah and Connecticut, several people at a Connecticut hospital and an old roommate. He also mailed a threatening letter to the Thomaston Post Office. According to officials, Prejean mailed the letters while on a cross-country drive from Connecticut to North Dakota.

If convicted, he faces a maximum sentence of 10 years in prison on each charge (Bio Prep Watch, 2010).

Title: Alabama Man Sentenced For Role In Anthrax Hoax Letters
Date: October 5, 2010
Source:
Bio Prep Watch

Abstract: An Alabama man has been sentenced to five years of probation for his role in a series of fake anthrax letters that were mailed across the state.

Milstead Darden, who pleaded guilty in June in U.S. District Court to conspiracy to mail hoax anthrax letters, was charged with mailing letters to several offices in the state, including U.S. Senator Richard Shelby's office, NBC13.com reports.

The letters allegedly contained a white powder that, following testing, was revealed to be a harmless substance.

“These type letters are a threat, not a joke,” U.S. Attorney Joyce White Vance told NBC13.com. “When people open or handle letters containing white powder, they fear for their health and must endure medical precautions against poisonous contaminants. The emergency response and required testing on every potentially harmful letter is costly,” she said. “These cases will be prosecuted.”

Darden is required to pay a $500 in addition to the five years of probation, NBC13.com reports.

In June, Darden admitted in a plea that he had allowed another man, Clifton Dodd, to prepare the letters in Darden's truck in the parking lot of a Pell City, Ala., store. Darden then drove Dodd to the post office, where Dodd put the letters into a drop box (Bio Prep Watch, 2010).

Title: Federal Grand Jury Hands Down Five Count Indictment For Anthrax Hoax
Date: October 9, 2010
Source:
Bio Prep Watch

Abstract: A federal grand jury in Bridgeport, Connecticut, returned a five count indictment this week against a man for delivering a bomb threat and for mailing threatening communications.

Roland Prejean, also known as Gary Joseph Gravelle, was indicted on four counts of mailing threatening communications, according to information released to TheDay.com by Connecticut U.S. Attorney David B. Fein. One of those four counts, Fein said, threatened federal employees.

The indictment alleges that Prejean mailed a letter to a Connecticut Superior Court judge that included a substance represented to be liquid anthrax, TheDay.com reports.

The indictment also alleges that Prejean sent threatening letters to a private individual and a probation officer in Connecticut.

Prejean also allegedly mailed a letter to the Thomaston post office claiming that he had planted a hidden bomb on a remote timer there. That letter, according to court documents, caused the evacuation of the Thomaston post office along with town hall and a nearby school. The post office was searched by local bomb technicians. No explosive or incendiary device was found, Fein told TheDay.com.

Prejean has been in custody since his Sept 7. arrest in North Dakota.

If convicted, Prejean will face a maximum term of 10 years in prison for making a bomb threat through the mail. He also faces up to 10 years for mailing a threatening communication to federal employees and up to five years for each of three counts of mailing a threatening communication (Bio Prep Watch, 2010).

Title: Alabama Man Indicted For Anthrax Hoax
Date: October 28, 2010
Source:
Bio Prep Watch

Abstract: A 71-year-old Alabama man was indicted this week by a federal grand jury for mailing hoax anthrax letters to offices in Alabama, Nebraska and Washington D.C.

Donald Perry Parks, of Toney, Ala., was indicted on three counts of mailing hoax anthrax letters, U.S. Attorney Joyce White Vance told the Associated Press. Vance said that Parks allegedly mailed hoax anthrax letters to the Alabama Republican Party's Homewood office in September.

According to Vance, Parks was also charged with mailing hoax anthrax letters to the Center for Responsive Politics in Washington, D.C., and the Mutual of Omaha Insurance Company in Omaha, Neb.

“When people receive or handle these letters that contain powder, they are put in fear for their lives or their health, and the emergency response to each letter costs taxpayers thousands of dollars,” Vance told the AP.

The maximum sentence for each count of sending hoax anthrax letters is 10 years in prison and a $250,000 fine for each mailing.

Peggy Sanford, a spokeswoman with Vance’s office, told the AP that in addition to the white powder, each letter also included a typewritten note describing the mailing as a "Koran Puffie.”

Sanford told the AP that internet searches of the term “Koran Puffie” lead to posts by a man identified as Don Parks on a website called ResistNet.com, which dubs itself the “Home of the Patriotic Resistance.”

Sanford said the this poster makes references to a Democratic plot to halt the Nov. 2 elections and links to a blog called “Puffie Warning” (Bio Prep Watch, 2010).

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