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    Identified Bio-Outbreaks (2006)

    BIOTERRORBIBLE.COM: The following outbreaks occurred within the calendar year of 2006. While some of the following reports may have been legitimate outbreaks, most if not all of them appear to be generated man-made outbreaks with the overall goal of convincing American and the world that it is on the precipice of a major pandemic. The fact that these outbreaks exists in mass confirms that an upcoming bio-terror attack is in the cards and may be played in a last ditch effort to regain political, economic and militarial control of society.

    Title: New York City Man Accidentally Exposed To Anthrax
    Date: February 22, 2006
    Source: New York 1

    Abstract: City officials say a Manhattan resident has been hospitalized after he was accidentally exposed to inhalation anthrax while working with animal skins in Brooklyn, but investigators say there is no evidence the exposure has anything to do with terrorism.

    In a press conference at City Hall Wednesday afternoon, Mayor Michael Bloomberg announced the 44-year-old man, who sources say is Vado Diomande, became ill last Thursday, February 16th, during a trip to Pennsylvania.

    Diomande was hospitalized in the town of Sayre, where doctors diagnosed the inhalation anthrax exposure and traced it back to New York City.

    Diomande is now recovering in a hospital in Sayre, where he is in an Intensive Care Unit listed in fair condition.

    City officials say Diomande, the artistic director at the Manhattan dance company Kotchegna, makes African drums from animal skins. Investigators believe was exposed to the anthrax after he worked with unprocessed cow and goat hides that he had purchased on a visit to the Ivory Coast in Africa in December.

    The city says he told investigators he worked with the animal skins in the days prior to his trip to Pennsylvania.

    Anthrax is a potentially deadly agent that naturally occurs in animals such as goats and cows.

    As a result of the exposure, the Department of Health and the Centers for Disease Control have sealed off Diomande’s work and storage area, as well as his car, in the DUMBO section of Brooklyn, and his residence in the West Village, to check for any signs of anthrax.

    "We have yet to enter the warehouse,” said Bloomberg. “We want to make sure that when we do that we protect the safety of the people who are going to go in and make the first assessment, and then over a period of time very carefully we'll make sure that if there is any anthrax it is decontaminated without letting it get out of that particular room, out of that building.”

    According to the DOH, four people who may have directly handled the same animal hides as Diomande are being treated with antibiotics as a precaution.

    The city says the case appears to be isolated. The mayor stressed that anthrax cannot be transmitted from person to person, and that other people who work in the DUMBO warehouse where the exposure occurred are not in any danger.

    “At this time, we have every reason to believe that this infection is an isolated, accidentally and naturally transmitted case. No other illnesses have been reported whatsoever,” said Bloomberg. “The city is working closely with local, state and federal health and law enforcement officials to investigate this case, and our Health Department is reaching out to anyone who might be at risk to provide them with antibiotics if necessary. There is no — let me repeat, no - evidence at this time of any criminal intent associated with this infection.”

    “He worked with unprocessed animal hides, which is a known way of getting Anthrax,” said DOH Commissioner Dr. Thomas Frieden. “He did that, as far we know from interviews with him, he did that only in a facility in DUMBO which is not populated by other people.”

    In the weeks following the 9/11 terrorist attacks, letters laced with anthrax were discovered in several locations around the country, including in New York City. The attacks, which remain unsolved, killed five people and sickened 17 (New York 1, 2006).