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Mosquitoe Spraying


Title: Low Flying Plane Is On A Mosquito Mission
Date: July 10, 2012
Source: CBS News Miami

Abstract: Skeeters a problem? Lots of people think so, so Miami-Dade officials are calling in the cavalry;well, actually, the Air Force to kill the biting pests and their breeding grounds. However, the attack may come as a surprise because of how low the spraying planes fly.

The county and the Air Force announced the plans Monday as complaints continue to rise. Recent rainy weather has caused the mosquito population to bloom, something that can cause problems to people headed to cookouts and 4th of fireworks celebrations.

Normally spraying is done in the early morning hours, but nighttime spraying allows the county another whack at the population.

This newest round of mosquito control involves a large C-130 cargo plane based in Ohio to spray Homestead ARB and communities of Doral, West Sweetwater, Kendall, Homestead, Florida City and areas east of U.S. 1, where heavy concentrations of mosquitos have been reported.

According to county officials, what may startle people the most is how low the planes fly. People in spraying areas could see planes just 150 feet off the ground and might be startled into thinking the plane is in trouble, but they said that is perfectly normal for spraying operations.

The planes will be spraying the pesticide Dibrom for the last two hours of the day July 10th, 11th and 12th, ending operations about a half hour after sunsets. The Air Force last conducted spraying like this in South Florida last July.

If you raise bees, the county said you should keep them covered during spraying operations. If you have allergies or sensitivity to pesticides, the spraying planners suggest you stay inside.

Residents are advised that aircraft will be flying as low as 150 feet.  Beekeepers are asked to keep their bees covered during the spraying operations in their particular area.  Individuals with known allergic reactions should remain indoors.

People who have questions about the aerial spraying, or complaints about mosquitoes, can call the County’s 311 Answer Center.

Miami-Dade residents can help reduce the nuisance caused by mosquitoes by remembering the “five Ds:”

1. Dusk and Dawn—avoid being outdoors when mosquitoes are most active.
2. Dress—wear long, loose, light-colored clothing that covers the skin.
3. DEET—use mosquito repellants that contain DEET
4. Drainage—eliminate standing water around the home in places such as buckets, cans, old tires, and plant containers
(CBS News Miami, 2012).

Title: Dallas County Allows Aerial Spraying For West Nile
Date: August 11, 2012
Source:
The Eagle

Abstract: Suffering from the nation’s deadliest outbreak of West Nile virus this year, Dallas County authorized aerial spraying of insecticide on Friday for the first time in nearly five decades to help fight the mosquito-born illness.

Texas’ second most populous county announced the decision after its leaders met with the state’s top health official and experts from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Nearly 90 cases of the most severe form of West Nile have been confirmed in the county so far, nine residents have died, and the virus’ peak season is just beginning.

“This is a matter of extreme concern, and we’re going to follow the science and do what’s best for our people,” said Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins, the county’s top elected official.

Five planes have been requested for spraying the heavily populated northern part of Dallas as well as the nearby enclaves of Highland Park and University Park — the most affected areas — but they won’t be used until leaders in those jurisdictions approve, said Jenkins, who urged the cities to allow the planes in.

Jenkins on Thursday declared a public health emergency. Three nearby counties have reported one death each.

There is no vaccine for the virus, which has been in the U.S. since about 1999, according to the CDC. The virus, which most often affects people over 50, can cause high fevers, headaches and disorientation.

Public health officials typically advise residents of mosquito-prone areas to drain standing water, apply insect repellent containing the ingredient DEET and wear long-sleeve shirts and long pants. But officials at Friday’s meeting said it’s clear that those warnings and ongoing ground-based spraying aren’t enough.

“It seems like the avoidance strategy is not working, so now you have to kill the bug,” said Dr. Rick Snyder, president of the Dallas County Medical Society.

The Texas Department of State Health Services this year has tracked 214 cases of neuroinvasive West Nile, the most serious form of the illness, including 89 in Dallas County. Noting that the peak season for the illness is just beginning, agency officials said they fear the state will break the record number for such cases — 438 — reported in 2003.

“This is a major outbreak,” said Dr. David Lakey, the department’s commissioner. “People need to do all they can to protect themselves.”

Aerial spraying is controversial. Some fear health effects from chemicals falling on them from the sky, and others have questioned whether the approach was scientifically proven to stop West Nile cases.

But at least one study in California has concluded that the odds of infection are about six times lower in treated areas than those that are untreated.

The American Mosquito Control Association doesn’t keep exact statistics, but an association spokesman said spraying is common in Florida, and ongoing programs exist in other states including Louisiana, New Jersey, Georgia, North Carolina, Michigan and Minnesota.

The Texas health agency said the intensity of the disease fluctuates from year to year in the state depending on factors such as weather and the number of birds and mosquitoes that spread it.

The large number of West Nile cases this year is due to the extremely hot weather and recent rains, according to the agency (The Eagle, 2012).

Title: Spraying Continues In Effort To Contain West Nile Virus
Date: August 15, 2012
Source:
CBS Chicago

Abstract: Officials were spraying to kill mosquitos in Skokie on Wednesday, as part of a continuing effort to contain the spread of the West Nile Virus.

CBS 2’s Marissa Bailey reports August is prime time for mosquitos, and if you’re sitting home thinking that you haven’t seen many mosquitos around, experts say they’re out there and you should take precautions.

In north suburban Skokie, where two people have been put into nursing homes after being becoming ill from the West Nile Virus, local leaders are saying close up your screen doors and windows to keep mosquitos out.

Throughout the past three weeks, the North Shore Mosquito Abatement District has seen 90 percent of the mosquito samples its collected test positive for West Nile Virus.

So far this year, there have been at least 12 confirmed human cases of West Nile, including two cases in Skokie.

“Our main point is to remind people that it’s still out there, and that they should not let their guard down,” said Skokie Public Health Director Dr. Catherine Counard.

Dusk and dawn are prime time for mosquito activity. Experts say you should check your own back yard for possible breeding sources for mosquitos.

The bloodsuckers thrive in stagnant water, so you should eliminate any standing water in pet dishes, bird baths, children’s toys, buckets, empty tires, or other places where water can pool and grow stagnant.

Officials said, if you leave your garbage can lid flipped upside down for a few days, it can become a breeding ground for mosquitos. So turn it over, clean it out, and close it up.

Meantime, Lake County reported its first confirmed human case of West Nile since 2010.

A 68-year-old Buffalo Grove man tested positive for West Nile encephalitis, according to the Lake County Health Department. He was hospitalized, but has since been released.

It takes about 3 to 14 days for symptoms of West Nile Virus to develop. When going outdoors, people should use insect repellant, especially around dawn and dusk when West Nile mosquitos are most active. Officials also advise wearing long sleeves and pants to avoid mosquito bites.

Doctors said the very young, the elderly and those with compromised immune systems are usually the most at risk of becoming sick from West Nile. Most people who contract the virus don’t suffer any symptoms (CBS Chicago, 2012)

Title: To Fight West Nile, Dallas Launches Arial Defense
Date: August 16, 2012
Source:
AP

Abstract: The last time Dallas used aerial spraying to curb the mosquito population, Texas' Lyndon Johnson was in the White House, Mission Control in Houston was launching Gemini missions and encephalitis was blamed for more than a dozen deaths.

But for the first time in more than 45 years, Dallas County has launched an aerial assault on the flying pests. Aircraft took off at 10 p.m. Thursday to spray insecticide over the county's northeastern quadrant to combat the nation's worst outbreak of West Nile virus. That outbreak has killed 10 people and caused at least 230 others to fall ill.

"I cannot have any more deaths on my conscience because we did not take action," Dallas Mayor Mike Rawlings said.

Although commonplace in other major cities, the efforts are provoking a debate in the Dallas area between health officials trying to quell disease risk and people concerned about insecticidal mist drifting down from above.

Nearly half of all West Nile cases in the United States so far this year are in Texas, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. If the trend continues, 2012 will be the worst West Nile year in state history.

The hot, dry weather across the nation's midsection has created ideal conditions for some species of mosquito. The heat speeds up their life cycle, which accelerates the virus replication process. And during a drought, standing water can quickly turn stagnant when it's not flushed away by rain or runoff.

In a coincidence Thursday, a Texas jury further south in DeWitt County awarded nearly $1 million to a Union Pacific employee who says he contracted West Nile virus while on the job after Hurricane Ike in 2008. Attorney Michael Sheppard said railroad worker Billy Nami, 62, lost more than half his cognitive function after being infected.

Both the mayor and Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins have declared a state of emergency and voiced their support for an aerial defense. Yet even with the threat of infection, the spraying has sparked widespread opposition from people who fear the chemicals could be harmful.

"It's something new there that has not been used in quite a number of years," said Dr. Roger Nasci of the CDC, explaining the public's worries. "Anything novel comes with that unknown factor."

Because of the severity of the outbreak, the Texas Health Department is stepping in to oversee the effort and to pay for it.

"This year is totally different from the experience Texas has had in the past," state Health Commissioner Dr. David Lakey said. "If it's nuisance mosquitoes, we ask the city or county to pay part of that. But in the midst of this disease outbreak, it's easier for us to go ahead and do it."

A national spraying company called Clarke was set to deploy two to five Beechcraft King Air twin-engine planes late Thursday night for three hours of spraying. One county-wide application costs about $1 million. A second application is possible if the first attempt does not kill enough mosquitoes.

Critics have also questioned whether the approach is scientifically proven to reduce West Nile cases. But at least one study in California concluded that the odds of infection are about six times lower in treated areas than those that are untreated.

Still, some residents fear the chemicals could harm their children, pets and useful insects such as honeybees and ladybugs.

The chemical released from the planes, synthetic pyrethroid, mimics a naturally occurring substance found in chrysanthemums. The Environmental Protection Agency has said that pyrethroids do not pose a significant risk to wildlife or the environment, though no pesticide is 100 percent safe.

About eight-tenths of an ounce of chemical is applied per acre, said Laura McGowan, a Clarke spokeswoman.

The insecticide's common name is Duet Dual-Action Adulticide. The label says it's toxic to fish and other types of aquatic life, and it contains distilled petroleum.

In states like California and Florida, aerial spraying is a "run-of-the-mill" response to West Nile, McGowan said.

When the mosquito population gets to be a certain level, "they automatically go up," she said. "They do it as a matter of course."

Kelly Nash, who lives in Dallas and works for an environmental consulting firm, questions whether the county is advocating for a controlled oil spill.

"One ounce an acre doesn't sound like much, but we will spray at least 2,000 gallons all over the city," Nash said. "A 2,000-gallon oil spill would be significant. I'm concerned that we're breeding resistant mosquitoes that next time will have Dengue fever or something worse."

Harris County, which includes humid, mosquito-filled Houston, has used aerial spraying once a year since 2002, the year the virus was first detected in Texas. The county uses ground spraying first and moves to aerial spraying as the virus spreads.

"We can't be everywhere at all times," Mosquito Control Director Dr. Rudy Bueno said. "Aerial treatment is a way to supplement what we do on the ground."

Most people infected with West Nile virus won't get sick, but about one in 150 people will develop the severe form of the illness. Symptoms include headache, high fever, neck stiffness, disorientation, coma, tremors, convulsions, muscle weakness and paralysis.

Jordan Conner, 14, spent eight days in intensive care with the most severe form of West Nile virus. Her mother, Ebonie Conner of Arlington, said she doesn't approve of aerial spraying and wishes local leaders would do more to educate the community.

"We've been desensitized to West Nile virus," Conner said. "It's been ingrained in us that it affects older people and infants. I think they need to pass out insect repellent, mention it in back-to-school drives."

Lane Robson, who runs up to 30 miles a week around White Rock Lake near her home in Lakewood, said aerial spraying seems like the right decision. But on spraying day, she plans to run indoors on a treadmill just to be safe.

Robson, 55, remembers the last time Dallas officials resorted to aerial spraying. She was 9, and her mother told her to stay inside.

"You have to weigh the good and the bad," Robson said. Spraying "is the lesser of two evils" (AP, 2012)

Title: Manhattan To Be Sprayed Against West Nile Virus
Date: August 28, 2012
Source:
Yahoo

Abstract: One of New York's most expensive neighborhoods will be sprayed this week with pesticide to combat the West Nile virus, officials said Tuesday.

The city regularly sprays against the mosquito-borne disease, which has seen a surge in outbreaks in the United States this year. Friday's spraying is notable because it will target Manhattan's prestigious Upper West Side neighborhood and parts of the famed Central Park.

"These neighborhoods are being treated due to rising West Nile virus activity with high and/or increasing mosquito populations," the Department of Health said in a statement.

The department said trucks would spray "a very low concentration" of pesticide and that "when properly used, this product poses no significant risks to human health."

However, it also urged people to stay indoors during the spraying and to remove clothes and children's toys from outside.

At least 41 people have died in the United States from the disease this summer, health officials said. A total of 1,118 cases have been identified across the country (Yahoo, 2012)

Title: Manhattan To Be Sprayed Against West Nile Virus
Date: August 28, 2012
Source:
Google News

Abstract:  One of New York's most expensive neighborhoods will be sprayed this week with pesticide to combat the West Nile virus, officials said Tuesday.

The city regularly sprays against the mosquito-borne disease, which has seen a surge in outbreaks in the United States this year. Friday's spraying is notable because it will target Manhattan's prestigious Upper West Side neighborhood and parts of the famed Central Park.

"These neighborhoods are being treated due to rising West Nile virus activity with high and/or increasing mosquito populations," the Department of Health said in a statement.

The department said trucks would spray "a very low concentration" of pesticide and that "when properly used, this product poses no significant risks to human health."

However, it also urged people to stay indoors during the spraying and to remove clothes and children's toys from outside.

At least 41 people have died in the United States from the disease this summer, health officials said. A total of 1,118 cases have been identified across the country (Google News, 2012)

Title: Manhattan To Be Sprayed With Pesticides To Fight West Nile Virus
Date: August 29, 2012
Source:
Raw Story

Abstract: One of New York’s most expensive neighborhoods will be sprayed this week with pesticide to combat the West Nile virus, officials said Tuesday.

The city regularly sprays against the mosquito-borne disease, which has seen a surge in outbreaks in the United States this year. Friday’s spraying is notable because it will target Manhattan’s prestigious Upper West Side neighborhood and parts of the famed Central Park.

“These neighborhoods are being treated due to rising West Nile virus activity with high and/or increasing mosquito populations,” the Department of Health said in a statement.

The department said trucks would spray “a very low concentration” of pesticide and that “when properly used, this product poses no significant risks to human health.”

However, it also urged people to stay indoors during the spraying and to remove clothes and children’s toys from outside.

At least 41 people have died in the United States from the disease this summer, health officials said. A total of 1,118 cases have been identified across the country (Raw Story, 2012)

Title: West Nile Virus “Outbreak” Justifies Spraying Toxic Chemicals Onto Citizens
Date: September 2, 2012
Source:
Infowars

Abstract: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) state that the cases of West Nile virus (WNV) are raising to the point of having the largest outbreak ever seen in the domestic US. In total, the CDC is reporting 1,118 cases with 41 deaths attributed.

Yet the CDC claims that most bitten by an infected mosquito do not come down with WNV. It appears the governmental agency fear-mongers and downplays the threat in the same breath.

Dr. Lyle Petersen, the director of the CDC’s Vector-Borne Infectious Disease Division confirmed:

The peak of West Nile virus epidemics usually occur in mid-August, but it takes a couple of weeks for people to get sick, go to the doctor and get reported. Thus we expect many more cases to occur.

The Connecticut Mosquito Management Program asserts that because the mosquitos carrying WNV are one an estimated 1 in 500 which would point the attribution of the infected to another source.

The areas of the country where the most cases have been reported are Texas, South Dakota, Mississippi, Oklahoma, Louisiana and Michigan. Petersen believes that “we think the reported numbers will get higher through October.”

Fifty-six percent of the reported cases correlate with a neuroinvasive disease wherein the WNV enters the nervous system directly causing the manifestation of meningitis or encephalitis.

In response to the “national outbreak” of WNV, there have been concerted efforts to step up the aerial assault of spraying to eradicate the disease. This spraying, to kill the mosquito population is causing viable damage to the humans and the environment which is most likely the reason for calling the WNV outbreaks a sorted epidemic.

The US government has been involved in creating designer viruses onto unwitting populations that have been the obvious causation of viral epidemics. In response to WNV and a burgeoning mosquito population in 2000, the spraying of malathione began. The result was a massive attack on the human immune system from the toxic chemical.

As the WNV “outbreak” is being hyped in the mainstream media now, the use of malathione is again being utilized. However, this chemical use is tantamount to bioterrorism on the American public. Malathione is a cancer-causing toxic substance that has been sprayed over-head in the name of keeping the WNV from continuing to spread.

Governmental propaganda extends to WNV outbreaks being initiated by suspected Middle Eastern “terrorists” according to Congressional record. In a 2002 Congressional testimony, Dr. Leonard Horowitz, said that the makers of WNV vaccines were suspect as participating in public outbreaks.

By combining CDC reports, with the documentation of pharmaceutical corporations, and bioweapons laboratories that supplied vials of WNV to Iraq in the 1980s, the movement of the bioweapon has been traced.

The Center for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology (CIGB) has conducted extensive research and development into bioterrorism since 1986. The Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) believes that the CIGB is a biological weapons laboratory. Because the CIGB was located in Cuba, the Castro connection and classification of Cuba as a terrorist nation then creeps into the American social meme.

The aerial response to the current WNV outbreak involves the chemical Duet which is an “advanced dual-action mosquito adulticide” that is combined with Anvil, another mosquito pesticide, as well as prallethrin. The purpose of these chemicals is because of their neurotoxic properties and damaging effects on the human immune system. They also are associated with organ failure, as well as dangerously carcinogenic as they have been linked to breast cancer (Infowars, 2012)

Title: West Nile Outbreak Forces Citywide Pesticide Spraying
Date: September 4, 2012
Source:
NYU Local

Abstract: Although summer is now officially over for NYU students, the heat and humidity are still going strong, and that has New York City health officials worried about the growing prevalence of West Nile virus in the city. 
After six new cases emerged in just the last three days, health officials announced pesticide sprayings will continue when necessary in order to combat the disease, which has already infected 14 people this year.

Sprayings of the insecticide Anvil recently occurred in the Upper West Side and southern Brooklyn, centered around some of the the city’s largest lakes in Central and Prospect Parks. The sprayings, the first in the city this year and only the third in the last decade in Manhattan, are meant to curb one of the largest outbreaks in U.S. history. This summer all lower 48 states have reported cases of the virus, which is spread via mosquito bite and can cause serious health problems and death. 

“West Nile virus is a serious disease,” said Dr. Waheed Bajwa, executive director of the  Department of Health’s Office of Vector Surveillance and Control, to Community Board 7, according to Windsor Terrace Patch. ”It can kill. So the message for the public is the best methods are preventive, and to avoid mosquito bites.”

But the sprayings have not come without some resistance, as anyone can expect when they are being told poison is about to be intentionally sprayed where they lived.

“We don’t need to poison our environment, kill off the mosquitoes’ natural predators, and cause long-term health problems,” said Mitchel Cohen, the Coordinator of No Spray Coalition, to Windsor Terrace Patch. “And that’s exactly what these spray trucks are going to do.” But officials are assuring New Yorkers that the sprayings pose little risk to humans. In a statement Department of Health officials said the pesticide,“no significant risks to human health, but some individuals may experience health effects.”

Even with the hell that is New York humidity continuing, New Yorkers should keep their windows closed, avoid wearing short-sleeved clothing when possible, and apply bug spray if they are outside for long periods of time. The spread of the virus will begin to slow down as fall approaches, but as last week’s 40 percent increase in cases showed, the continuing late summer humidity will be a huge factor in mosquito populations. And the remnants of Hurricane Isaac, which are supposed to soak New York this week, will not be any help.

But health officials told the New York Times, that so far the number of cases, “is within the same range that we have seen over the past decade,” and that the city is “taking every precaution necessary across the city and is regularly spraying to protect the health of New Yorkers” (NYU Local, 2012)

Title: Manhattan Next Urban Area To Be Mass-Sprayed With Pesticides In West Nile Propaganda Circus
Date: September 5, 2012
Source:
Natural News

Abstract: Thousands of residents living in dozens of neighborhoods at the center of the "Big Apple" are the latest victims to be forcibly sprayed with toxic pesticides as part of the ongoing, nationwide propaganda circus involving West Nile virus (WNv). Reports indicate that thousands of Manhattanites and others living in Brooklyn and elsewhere have already begun to be doused with Anvil, a toxic insecticide chemical linked to endocrine disruption, liver damage, infertility, cognitive damage, and cancer, among other conditions.

As of this writing, the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene reports that there have been a mere 10 documented cases of West Nile Encephalitis or Meningitis in New York thus far in 2012, which is apparently enough to warrant mass chemical sprayings throughout Manhattan's prestigious Upper West Side, Brooklyn's South Side, Central Park, and elsewhere. The sprayings reportedly began on Friday, August 31, and have continued in the days that followed.

Anvil is safe, but it actually isn't, say officials

New York officials have already come out claiming that Anvil poses "no significant risks to human health," insisting all the while that mass ground sprayings are the best preventive measure the city can take to curb mosquito populations that might be harboring the much-feared disease. And yet in the same breath, officials also warned that "some individuals may experience health effects," which has created much confusion throughout the city.

It turns out that not everyone was convinced from the start that blanketing large swaths of New York City in pesticides was a good idea, and many tried to protest the decision. But just like in Dallas, Texas, where similar aerial sprayings of pesticides recently took place, officials flatly ignored the concerns of the populace and proceeded forward with their plans to blast a known neurotoxin throughout New York City's residential enclaves.

"We don't need to poison our environment, kill off the mosquitoes' natural predators, and cause long-term health problems," said Mitchel Cohen, Coordinator of the group No Spray Coalition, to Windsor Terrace-Kensington Patch about the misguided spraying efforts. "And that's exactly what these spray trucks are going to do."

Activist and A.R.T.I.S.T. president Robert Lederman actually put together a comprehensive list of the Top 10 Lies About 
West Nile Virus and Anvil that explains how the side-effects associated with exposure to Anvil are often extreme, despite what authorities might claim. He also expounds upon why WNv is hardly the "deadly" disease that the mainstream media and federal health authorities continually claim it to be.

West Nile virus may not even exist

What is even more disturbing about all the WNv hysteria; however, is the fact that the disease itself may not even exist. Freelance investigative reporter Jon Rappoport recently wrote a piece about how there is no concrete scientific evidence proving that WNv is even a real disease, as it has never been isolated and examined. The symptoms associated with the disease that is currently being correlated with mosquito bites here in the U.S. are likely being caused by some other factor.

One such possibility is that the individuals who are being diagnosed with WNv virus are actually suffering from exposure to environmental chemicals and air pollution. If this is the case, spraying Anvil as a supposed remedy will only make the problem worse, and potentially exacerbate the number of people who become ill or die from compounded chemical exposure
(Natural News, 2012)
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