Whalley Shops 1800-1950

STARTING FROM THE BRIDGE AND WALKING TOWARDS THE ROUNDABOUT ON THE LEFT HAND SIDE OF THE STREET.

BUTCHER

At No. 1 King Street, there was a Butcher's behind Abbey Corn Mill.

CORNMILL

The mill was built in 1820 on the site of the original one.

READING ROOM

This was the first house on the left of King Street near to the Butchers. It was the village's first ever Library/Reading Room.

SHOE REPAIRS

At No. 5 King Street, Ted Wallbank had his boot, shoe and clog repair shop after moving from Billington.

GREENGROCERS

This is were Joe & Fred Woods sold fruit, fresh fish and game.

GARAGE

Further along King Street was a garage known as Crook's Garage.

Louis Crook's Garage sold petrol, did repairs and had a showroom. In 1934 he proudly displayed the first brand new 100 motor car. He offered it at a discount of £99 and 5 shillings. It was an 8 horse-powered Ford Popular.

Louis boldly displayed a sign over his till in the shop that read "The clock ticks, but we don't!"

ABBEY DENE CAFE

This is now the Trishna Indian Restaurant.

BILLY DAY'S

This was a sweet shop selling cigarettes and ice cream. Soft drinks were served in the parlour to the right of the entrance, serving hot Vimto in Winter.

CLOCK DRESSER

A couple of doors down from Billy Day's was a very narrow little house. A clock dresser set up here but didn't last long.

MILLINERY

Miss Lillie Fowler took over from the clock dressers business for a few years until she married and then the cottage reverted back to a dwelling.

BARBER

This was run by 'Little Jackie' Wareing and his son Alan. In between clients Jackie and Alan repaired umbrellas.

HOTEL

Between the Barber Shop and the Chemist was the entrance to the Friars Temperance Hotel, which occupied the rest of the block including the room behind the Chemist. It was owned by the Wareing Family. After it closed down it was re-opened as a Barbers Shop and then a library.

CHEMIST

The shop was owned by Mr. Dawson and later Mr. Camm, who integrated it into a Post Office as well.

FOUNDRY

This was situated on the left at the back of King Street and was owned by Mr. Fred Groomes. The Foundry was sold to Deans of Burnley after the first world war.

GARAGE

This was situated on the right at the back of King Street and was called Abbot Motor Works. It was a very busy garage, run by Fred Groome, employing six to eight men and four apprentices. The garage was open from 8 in the morning until 10 at night and sometimes all night if a vehicle was urgently needed.

FISH & CHIP SHOP

The shop was situated on King Street and had a diner at the rear seating 12 people.

LADIES HAIRDRESSERS

Next door to the chip shop and owned by Miss Wilding.

SHOE SHOP

This was owned by Johnnie Webb and sold ladies, gents and childrenís footwear. The room to the left was used by two men who did repairs. There was a large cut-out of a ladies shoe above the door.

CO-OP

The first Co-Op shop in the village was established next to the shoe shop. It contained a grocery and butchery department but later reverted back to selling just groceries.

ANTIQUES

This was situated next door to the Co-Op.

LADIES DRESS SHOP

It was owned by Miss Annie Roose and sold dresses, hats and coats. She married Mr Jesse Ireland who owned the Antique shop next door.

GROCERS

Walter Fenton owned this business.

SWEET SHOP

Mrs Dobson sold chocolates, cigarettes and ice cream from these premises.

CAR ACCESSORY/TAXI OFFICE

This was also the home of Mr & Mrs Groome of the garage business in Back King Street. It was next door to the sweet shop.

STARTING FROM THE BRIDGE AND WALKING TOWARDS THE ROUNDABOUT ON THE RIGHT HAND SIDE OF THE STREET.

BRIDGE COTTAGE

Here Mrs Foreman served light meals, catering especially for the C.T.C. (Cyclist's Touring Club.) Tables were on the back lawn in the summer making their snacks more enjoyable.

LORD JOHN STREET (CALDER VALE)

The larger building in the middle of the row was the Reading Room. All the daily newspapers and periodicals were available, plus billiards, table tennis etc and their membership was open to all.

THE TOBY JUG

The above was not so called until after the war. It was the farmhouse of King Street Farm. It was owned and farmed by Harry Yates. His daughters and Mrs Yates ran a very successful ice cream business entered by a separate door way from the house entrance. They also sold and delivered milk to the houses nearby. In summer they supplied jugs of tea with cups for picnics on their land by the riverbank, charging five to ten shillings deposit for the crockery to make sure it was returned. it has a wealth of oak panelling believed to have come from Whalley Abbey.

TEA SHOP

In the middle of the same terraced row as The Toby Jug was a cottage owned by Mrs Doddin who served tea, coffee, scones and light meals.

GENTS OUTFITTERS

Crossing the end of Princess Street we come to the Gents Outfitters owned by John J. Price. He was hardly ever seen without spats over his shoes.

IRONMONGERS

Mr Reece a soft spoken Welshman managed this business for Wm. Langshaw & Sons.

FISH & CHIP SHOP

This was next door to the Ironmongers and had a dining room both upstairs and down, total seating for 24 people.

HAIRDRESSERS

Mrs Fell ran this business from her home.

GENERAL STORE

Owned by Mr Cunliffe and now Lloyds Chemist.

YE OLDE WHALLEY HOUSE

Passing the end of the back street, and the entrance to The Whalley Arms Car Park, were two old cottages which were used as a cafe.

THE BLUE PIGEON

The second cottage was also a cafe serving pie, chips and peas to the wounded soldiers from Calderstones Hospital. This was owned by Sally & Walter Picking.

WHALLEY ARMS

The Whalley Arms is of late 18th century construction and was built from stone brought from Portfield Hall, which itself was built from stone taken from Whalley Abbey. The Hall had fallen into ruins.

Until the late 19th century the premises had its own farm attached.

The pub catered for weddings, funerals and other functions. On the car park was a long wooden building serving soft drinks, tea, coffee and snacks, catering for the hundreds of coaches passing through the village on their way to Blackpool.

For two hours a morning, the car park was full of coaches as many as 20 at a time.

STARTING FROM THE WHALLEY ARMS AND WALKING UP ACCRINGTON ROAD.

BUTCHERS SHOP

This was No. 1 Accrington Road.

RADIO SHOP

No. 2 Accrington Road was a radio shop, owned by Harry Hargreaves. The business did well for a time but then became a cafÈ.

BUILDERS

The little bungalow opposite The Whalley Arms car park was originally the office of Thomas Varley & Sons. A large yard and store at the far side were behind the office.

Varley's were famous as bridge builders and stone masons. They built Calder Bridge and many other bridges throughout Lancashire.

GRAMOPHONES

This was in the rear yard of Whalley Police Station. Here William & George Sutton had a wooden cabin. They sold Decca, HMV and Columbia gramophones as well as records.

In 1932 Austin Quinn then took over the hut with his shoe repairing business and remained there until the end of World War II, when he retired.

POLICE STATION

The newly built Police Station replaced the old one that had stood for many years in King Street, on what is now the site of the Health Centre. Here worked six Constables, with the most popular being Tommy Wood. The station had one patrol car, one motor bike, six Special Constables and a Sergeant.

BLACKSMITH

Behind the Police Station was Bob Altham's property. He was a master craftsman in ironwork and was always busy. He made the ornamental gates for the Long Walk entrance to the Abbey in King Street (next to Calder Bridge, upon entering Whalley from Billington.)

UNION CLUB

This was opposite the Police Station, which had Mr Ellis Kenyon as the steward. This was established in 1879.

GENERAL STORE

Mrs Kenyon ran the above premises which was situated next door to the Union Club. She sold groceries, toffees and cigarettes.

BAKERY

On the same side higher up from the Police Station.

LADIES/CHILDRENS WEAR SHOP

A few doors along from the Bakery, Mrs Chatburn and her daughters ran this business. This was one of the busiest shops in the village selling mainly underwear and a great variety of materials, such as cotton, silk and wool.

WHEELWRIGHT/JOINER/UNDERTAKER

Behind Mrs Chatburn's, was a large wooden shed which housed the business of Malcolm C. Robinson, who was a good craftsman.

THE ASSEMBLY ROOMS

The above were built in 1890.

Dancing was held here twice weekly and had a cafe/dining hall to cater for weddings, funerals and private parties.

They were once owned by Martin Coggin's and affectionately known as The Sems.

GARAGE

This was owned by Arthur & Harry Hart.

OLD TOLL HOUSE

The last cottage on Accrington Road stands forward from the rest. It was a shop selling sweets, cigarettes and a few groceries.

SANDY BROW TOLL HOUSE

The hill climbing up Accrington Road was known as Sandy Brow. At the top was another Toll House, which became part of Whalley Golf Club. It was demolished along with the Club House when the new by-pass was built.

A near replica of the Toll House was built at the corner of Hayhurst Road and Clitheroe Road. It has now been demolished and a memorial seat stands in its place.

OFF ACCRINGTON ROAD ONTO QUEEN STREET

HAIRDRESSING

At the end of Queen Street, Miss Dolly Inham catered for ladies, offering hairdressing in her front parlour.

WHEELWRIGHTS

In a large shed at the back of Queen Street, Mr George Holden and his son Robert made hay carts, flat four wheeled lorries, wheelbarrows, farm gates and wood hayracks.

BLACKSMITH

Next to the wheelwright business was Joe Towers, where he had his forge after leaving a site next to Old Vale House. He had to leave the Vale House premises, to allow Ribble Motor Services to open up the bus station there.

Joe spent most of his days shoeing the many farm horses. He also repaired farm machinery and made hinges and hangers for gates.

STARTING FROM THE ROUNDABOUT ON THE LEFT HAND SIDE OF KING STREET TO CHURCH LANE

THE DOG INN

Until the late 19th century the premises had its own farm attached. Its original name was The Spotted Dog and for some years a Dalmation was on the sign.

The pub relied on its beer sales, as it did not cater for meals or snacks.

SWEET SHOP

This shop was next to The Dog Inn. It belonged to Mrs Lakeland and Mrs Donnelly who sold tobacco, cigarettes, sweets, stationary, postcards of Whalley and birthday cards etc.

GENERAL STORE

The shop was next to the Sweet Shop and was run by Mrs Brennan.

THE DE-LACY

The above was formerly known as the Shoulder of Mutton. The inn was constructed in the early 1860's, on the site of the ancient Manor House of Whalley.

This pub offered beer, meals and snacks. They catered for wedding receptions and funerals.

CHURCH LANE TO CROSS HOUSE, THE SANDS.

ANTIQUE SHOP

No. 6 Church Lane, opposite the Church gate was the Antique shop owned by Mr Parker.

BREAD SHOP

This was the end cottage in Church Square immediately opposite the school entrance. Good home-made bread was their speciality and had a great trade until the beginning of the war.

SWEET AND ICE CREAM SHOP

This was behind Cross House at the end of The Sands. Mr Algernon Benjamin Parker was the owner. It was a kiosk, as Ben served you through the window at the side of the building that fronted onto the path towards the River. He also sold home-made sarsaparilla.

He named his shop Uncle Tom's Cabin, because he used an old door as a notice board to advertise his wares.

STARTING FROM CHURCH LANE ON THE LEFT HAND SIDE OF KING STREET TO GEORGE STREET

ROPE WORKS

In 1850 The premises on the corner of Church Lane and King Street were used as the Rope Works. Hemp made into rope was stretched out from the works upto the Cenotaph and placed in the stream that ran the full length of King Street into the River Calder. It would then be twisted and pulled into required lengths and thickness. It was taken out and laid on the side to dry. Later the business was sold and became a painter & decorators.

PAINTER & DECORATORS

It was the headquarters of Wm. Pollard, Painters, Plumbers, Decorators and Glaziers. The premises incorporated Pollard & Wallis Electricians.

DRESS SHOP

Next to Pollard's, they sold gowns and suits.

BAKERY

Mr & Mrs Arthur Edmondson employed three other staff to help run this business.

NATIONAL WESTMINSTER BANK

This was the most imposing building in the village.

GEORGE STREET TO GREEN PARK

CO-OP

The Co-Op had its origin in Billington. In 1912 they built their emporium in Whalley and changed the name to Billington & Whalley Industrial Co-Operative Society.

There were several departments. The first as you approached from King Street was the office. The Manager, Secretary, Assistant Secretary, Typist Clerk and Office Girl worked in this section.

CINEMA/BALLROOM

This was above the Co-Op and seated 400 people. Clearing the cinema of its seating, it was transformed into the best ballroom in the Ribble Valley. The regular annual Balls were the Farmers, the Police, the Nursing Association, the Infirmary and the best of all New Years Eve.

CAFE

At the end of the cinema, was the nice cafe. It was capable of dining 100 people, with a well equipped kitchen. Weddings, funerals and private parties were catered for.

GROCERY

On the ground floor of the Co-Op building was a grocery department. A manager, two staff and an errand boy were kept busy all day.

DRAPERY

Next door to the grocery department was the drapery section. This was large and had a double front with three large windows. One displayed dresses, the next window menswear and finally one showing footwear for all ages.

FURNITURE

Furniture of all descriptions could be bought. A few items were stocked such as beds and chairs as well as a couple of radios.

COAL

This was another department which operated from The Sidings at Whalley Railway Station.

BAKERY

Bread and cakes were baked fresh daily on the block at the far end of the building.

SHOE REPAIRS

At the back of the Co-Op building, you came to the boot, shoe and clog repair shop. It was manned by Mr Hull and his two assistants.

BUTCHERY

This was situated at the end of the premises, which employed a manager and an apprentice.

GARAGE

Across the car park at the rear of the bungalow, that now stands at the end of George Street, was the large garage that housed the grocery delivery van, the butchers van, small bakery van and the coal delivery wagon.

BANK

The society ran its own bank and was not affiliated to any part of the National Co-Op movement. This made it easy to transfer and deposit savings as one wished.

Finally, the cash flow ran out and too proud to admit defeat, the Secretary took an overdose and left the unlit gas on.

The scandal was front page news in the national press for a week. Life savings were gone, mostly those of the poorest people in the community.

The manager's own brother, who had been deceived more than most, applied for a petition in bankruptcy against the Society and just after noon on a Monday in October 1962, as customers were being served, the Court Bailiffs walked in and closed all the departments down. That was the end.

STARTING FROM GEORGE STREET ON THE LEFT HAND SIDE OF KING STREET (INCORPORATING PARK VILLAS, FORMERLY KNOWN AS ROPE WALK) TO THE OLD GRAMMAR SCHOOL

GRAMOPHONES

On the corner of George Street and King Street, William Sutton and his wife lived. Bill and his brother, as mentioned before, set up the gramophone business, which transferred to the front room of the house. After a couple of years radio overtook the gramophone and the partnership dissolved.

Bill turned the shop into a very successful sweets, chocolate, cigarettes and ice cream shop, that was known all over Lancashire for its quality.

DOCTOR

Next door to Sutton's was a private house, where Dr. Lawrie of Sabden rented the parlour and held daily surgeries.

BUTCHER

The next property was converted into a butchers shop in 1930. It soon closed, as he left his wife and ran away to Blackpool with another woman. His wife struggled on for a week or two and then had to sell.

GREENGROCERS

After the Butchers closed, the shop was acquired and turned into a very successful greengrocery, fresh fruit and fish shop.

MARTINS BANK

This was on the third block of Park Villas. In the front room of the first house, Martins Bank offered daily service of normal banking hours.

W.M. LANGSHAW & SONS

In the odd shaped corner of land by the side entrance to the Grammar School, the above built what are now the three shops. When it was first built there was a shop, three garages and another shop, which was a showroom used by Langshaw's to display their beautiful carvings and church furniture which they were renowned for at the time.

ARTHUR PRESTON - CHEMIST

The first shop on the Langshaw Row. Arthur was a newly qualified Chemist and quite successful.

GARAGE

This was situated next to the Chemist.

NATION FIRE BRIGADE

The title was N.F.S. it was the local volunteer company. The fire tender was a converted Humber Snipe, towing a Coventry Climax Pump, which was a gift from Mr. George Henry Taylor of Graithwaite, the village patron and benefactor at that time. He also gave a similar car to the A.R.P. rescue service, whose headquarters were at the Methodist School.

GRAMMAR SCHOOL

The Charter for the school was issued in 1547. it was the successor of the school the Monks established over the North West Gate of the Abbey. It stands at Stocks Hill (Site of the one time village stocks and pillory). The present building dates from 1725.

The L.D.V. (Look, Duck and Vanish) later renamed as the Home Guard were housed in the Grammar School.

At the rear of the Grammar School in a few of the old classrooms, private lessons were given to children of primary school age. This was about 1935 and two dozen pupils continued until after the war for some years until Miss Camm (daughter of the old chemist) became to old and modern standards required more than Miss Camm and the old buildings could provide.

They wore a light grey uniform, with red blouses or jumpers and were a familiar and pretty site as the school took nature walks and other journeys around the village.

The main hall of the Grammar School was the C of E Institute for young men, from 14 to marriage and after if their wives allowed. It was a very popular club with a billiards table, table tennis and table games, such as chess and draughts. They also ran a football team. Similar facilities were available at the Methodist School for their young men.

Bill Martin ran the branch of St. Johns Ambulance headquarters here for many years.

The main hall was fitted out as a kind of gymnasium. During the war years it served as the Homeguard headquarters.

It now serves the area as an Adult Education Centre and Nursery School.

STARTING FROM THE ROUNDABOUT ON THE RIGHT HAND SIDE OF KING STREET TO THE OLD GRAMMAR SCHOOL

THE SWAN HOTEL

Until the late 19th century the premises had its own farm attached. It was noted as a coaching inn and the Manchester Mail made scheduled stops here. The pub was also the meeting place of The Sisterly Love Society in 1818. This was an unusual friendly society for women only.

Bed & Breakfast accommodation was here and the Landlord was Mr John Shaw.

A past Landlord mentioned, that in the 1700's a servant named Mary Lane worked at The Swan. The owner made her pregnant but when the child was born it was taken off her. Mary committed suicide and she apparently wanders around looking for her baby.

One evening two residents who were staying at the Hotel heard a baby crying about 3am. The room in which they slept, was where a passage way led to the third floor. On several occassions the top door, on the third floor, has been heard to open and close many times.

GROCERY SHOP

This was owned by Mr & Mrs Start and was next to The Swan Hotel.

NEWSAGENT

This was run by Bob Langshaw. His counter was an upturned tea box.

VALE HOUSE HOTEL

Mrs Wareing and her daughter Sally, ran this unlicensed hotel, offering accommodation.

During the Second World War the premises acted as a canteen for the servicemen stationed at Barrow Printworks, Calderstones and Moreton Hall. It was manned by members of the W.R.V.S. offering tea and snacks.

After the war ended it took a renewed life as a cafe, but the building deteriorated and had to be demolished.

To the left of Vale House was a five barred gate leading into a field that became the site for the building of Woodlands Drive by Wm. Langshaws & Sons in 1936 at a cost of £230.00 per house. The houses at the top of Woodlands Drive cost £250.00.

METHODIST CHURCH

This was built in 1872 and replaced the first Chapel made from converted cottages in Church Lane in 1806.

LANCASHIRE ELECTRIC POWER COMPANY

The above attended quarterly in the Methodist School, to receive payment of electricity bills, whilst in the house porch next door to the Methodist Church (The Vale Hotel side) The Accrington Gas and Water Board provided a similar service.

LANGSHAW'S JOINERS/UNDERTAKERS/BUILDERS

Ted (Edwin) Chew was by trade a joiner and partner in the firm of William Langshaw's. The workshop was used as the Village Hall until 1890 and all the work benches would be moved back for dancing.

Some of Ted's finest work can be seen at Whalley Parish Church.

They employed eight men plus apprentices and derived their power for the machinery from the old water wheel until a few years later after the war.

The machinery used was a donkey engine and because of its antiquity the B.B.C. made recordings of it in action for their sound archives.

The long workshops to the rear of the premises, prior to the construction of the local Assembly Rooms, were used for village dances.

THE CROFT

In 1933, Dr. Harkness had a practice here. Mrs Harkness put the large unused rooms to good use, which housed themselves and the daily surgeries.

She ran a very successful maternity and convalescent home.

STARTING FROM THE ROUNDABOUT AT THE OLD GRAMMAR SCHOOL ONTO MITTON ROAD ON THE LEFT HAND SIDE

LIBRARY

Just passed the Grammar School was the Library which also held the Estate Office of the Worsley-Taylor Family of Moreton Hall.

ALMSHOUSES

In 1835, on Station Road, Mr. Adam Cottam paid for the building of the Adam Cottam Cottages (now known as The Almshouses). They were built for the senior ladies of the village. Mr. Cottam set up a trust fund of £2,000 to ensure they continued.

TENNIS COURTS

Between the Worsley-Taylor Family office and Abbey Road was the Albion Tennis Club in Summer. It had two grass courts, which were fully occupied during afternoons and evenings.

CALDER CAFE

This was built in 1935 to accommodate rail travellers. But it was too late, rail travel was already out of fashion, as buses had already taken most of the trade. The cafe still ticked over with a little toffee and cigarette sales plus the patronage of the nurses who lived in accommodation at Calderstones. This business is now Abbots Court Restaurant.

TAXI

Outside Oriel House stood a long narrow sign with the word Taxi written upon it. The lettering from top to bottom was easily visible from the train station, as it was meant to be.

STARTING FROM WHALLEY TRAIN STATION ON MITTON ROAD ON THE RIGHT SIDE

HAULAGE AND COAL BUSINESS

High Lawn is the first house beyond the station next to the Whalley Cricket, Tennis & Bowling Club. Here a Mr. Wilkinson (affectionately known as Pa Pa Wilkinson) ran the above business. He had about four small thirty hundred weight and two ton wagons. One delivered coal around the district from the coal sidings at the station, as did at least three other coal merchants.

Two other of his vehicles would be on hire to Lancashire County Highways, whose department and yard were opposite the Grammar School (these buildings are still used today by Lancashire County Engineering)

Pa Pa Wilkinson's other vehicles were on goods carrying duty from surrounding towns to the village.

BUTCHERY

From a house in the middle of the stone terrace a little further along Mitton Road, a young fellow and his sister started up this business. Most of their trade was picked up by hawking meat in a little Austin Seven Van, to all the out-lying farms and cottages in the area. They sold the business and continued to live in the house as a dwelling.

GROCERS/MIXED BUSINESS

The first house in the next terrace a Mr. Clint had his grocers, assisted by his daughter Miss Clint. She had a bicycle on which she used to load great bags of groceries and wheel it to the far end of Bridge Terrace, delivering all the way.

STARTING FROM THE ROUNDABOUT AT THE OLD GRAMMAR SCHOOL ON THE LEFT HAND SIDE OF CLITHEROE ROAD

DENTIST

In the first house of the large terraced houses on the left as you leave the village, a Mr. Morgan opened up the first Dental Practice.

GROCERS

A bungalow built at the end of the terrace was a grocers/mixed business, but was not very successful. After that, for a short while, upto the war it became a post-op convalescence home.

PHOTOGRAPHS OF WHALLEY - SEE GALLERY

 
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