British Female Tennis Players

    tennis players
  • (Tennis player) Tennis is a sport usually played between two players (singles) or between two teams of two players each (doubles). Each player uses a racquet that is strung to strike a hollow rubber ball covered with felt over a net into the opponent's court.
  • (tennis player) an athlete who plays tennis
  • (Tennis PLAYER) Over RATEDSteffi Graf - August 27, 2001
    british
  • Of the British Commonwealth or (formerly) the British Empire
  • The Britons (sometimes Brythons or British) were the Celtic people living in Great Britain from the Iron Age through the Early Middle Ages.Koch, pp. 291–292. They spoke the Insular Celtic language known as British or Brythonic.
  • the people of Great Britain
  • Of or relating to Great Britain or the United Kingdom, or to its people or language
  • of or relating to or characteristic of Great Britain or its people or culture; "his wife is British"
    female
  • being the sex (of plant or animal) that produces fertilizable gametes (ova) from which offspring develop; "a female heir"; "female holly trees bear the berries"
  • Of or denoting the sex that can bear offspring or produce eggs, distinguished biologically by the production of gametes (ova) that can be fertilized by male gametes
  • characteristic of or peculiar to a woman; "female sensitiveness"; "female suffrage"
  • Relating to or characteristic of women or female animals
  • (of a plant or flower) Having a pistil but no stamens
  • an animal that produces gametes (ova) that can be fertilized by male gametes (spermatozoa)
british female tennis players british female tennis players - A Detective
A Detective in Love: A Mystery
A Detective in Love: A Mystery
In that mythical Victorian piano-legs -in-pantaloons era people, at least in the respectable classes, may have convinced themselves that sex was something that manifested itself only when a baby had to be made. But in fact it's us, the sophisticated, we-know-it-all generation, who still don't really acknowledge how we're all in a every way all the time at the mercy of that louring cloud.

Detective Harriet Martens--the title character from The Hard Detective--returns in this newest police procedural from a master of the genre, H. R. F. Keating. Detective Martens has a well-deserved reputation for unyielding toughness. In The Hard Detective, she led a Stop the Rot campaign against local crime and faced down a brutal killer on a spree of cop killing. Now, she has been called on to lead the investigation into the murder of Bubbles Xingara, Britain's number one tennis star and media darling, who was found dead on the grounds of her sprawling country home. The case is sure to draw worldwide attention.

The mystery, however, isn't what tests the Hard Detective's strength. It's the fact that Detective Martens, devoted wife, has fallen madly and passionately in love with a subordinate officer. From her first meeting with that subordinate, Martens must struggle not only to solve a perplexing homicide, but also to control her increasing urges and to withstand temptation. Her difficulties are made no easier by her husband regularly commenting on the unavoidable power of "amorousness."

British author H.R.F. Keating has long been recognized for his willingness to experiment with the conventions of detective fiction. A number of his recent novels, for instance, have addressed the motives and lifestyles of his sleuths as much as they have crimes. He continues that pattern with A Detective in Love, in which Harriet Martens--the so-called Hard Detective--is undone by her passion for a colleague with whom she probes the slaying of curvaceous teenage tennis star Bubbles Xingara.
The "Brit with a Hit," as Bubbles's American fans know her, has been found on her Leven Vale estate, stabbed through the throat. Due to this victim's prominence and the shorthandedness of the local police, Detective Superintendent Martens is seconded from adjacent Birchester to take charge of the case. Her best suspect may be a "shambling mess of a man" given to exposing himself. Other likely murderers include Bubbles's secretary, a once-wealthy classmate involved with the decedent's stepfather; a French gangster whose affections Ms. Xingara too publicly rebuffed; and a computer geek who hoards Bubbles images from the Internet. As weeks pass without a breakthrough, however, Martens worries for her future with this investigation as well as her ability to resist Anselm Brent, a country constable of dubious talent, who nonetheless makes the hardened Harriet go all soft inside. Keating's persistent attention to his protagonist's sex life begins to grate, as his principal plot bounces repeatedly between hope and failure. But this novel--the second part of a trilogy, following The Hard Detective--compensates somewhat with a delightfully peculiar cast of secondary players and Martens's comical impatience toward everyone and everything around her, even her own media-made reputation. --J. Kingston Pierce

142/365 This One's For Tim
142/365 This One's For Tim
Tim Henman, that is. Who was the only British tennis player - male or female - to qualify for this year's Wimbledon based on their world ranking (Andy Murray would have been another, had he been fit). There is no shortage of people in Britain who feel, for whatever reason, they are in a position to criticise Tim Henman. I am not one of those people. I will defend Henman's tennis career till the day I die. For the last dozen years he almost single-handedly represented British tennis, and did so successfully. Now that his career appears to be approaching the end, I am sad. Why I love Tim: 17 career tournament finals 11 career tournament wins 8 consecutive years finishing in the world's top-20 (1997-2004) Highest world ranking: 4th (on two occasions) Over $11,000,000 in career prize money 4 Wimbledon semi-final appearances (losing to the eventual champion in each) I grew up in the days when Jeremy Bates was the best British tennis player, the days when we rarely had anyone in the world's top-100 - then Henman came along and, on his own, made British tennis respectable again.
UK - London - Wimbledon Lady
UK - London - Wimbledon Lady
Shadow of an unknown Wimbledon lady. Whenever I go to an Event like Wimbledon I'm always on the lookout for something a bit different. Peoples shadows was a theme I picked up on the first time I went so when I went again I added some more to the series. P.S : Better luck next year Andy Murray.
british female tennis players
8-Film British Cinema Collection V.2
In eight critically-acclaimed films, Britain's biggest stars light up the screen. From lovers' quarrels to stories of survival, there's something for everyone to celebrate about British cinema in this collection.

ROBERT LOUIS STEVENSON'S ST. IVES
During the Napoleonic Wars, a French captain is taken to a prisoner of war camp where he falls in love with a beautiful local woman and befriends a British major.

SCHOOL FOR SEDUCTION
After taking classes at an Italian temptress's School for Seduction, four friends unleash themselves upon their unsuspecting partners with lustful abandon.

DIRTY PRETTY THINGS
A harrowing tale of struggle and survival for two immigrants who learn that everything is for sale in London's secret underworld.

LEO TOLSTOY'S ANNA KARENINA
In this riveting adaptation of one of Leo Tolstoy's greatest works, love and lust know no bounds as a woman (Vivien Leigh) risks her marriage to one man for her attraction to another.

ROWING WITH THE WIND
Hugh Grant and Elizabeth Hurley join forces in this haunting story of mystery and imagination set during the conception of Mary Shelley's Frankenstein.

LOVE AMONG THE RUINS
Past lovers Arthur (Laurence Olivier) and Jessica (Katharine Hepburn) are reunited when Jessica is charged with breach of promise and Arthur serves as her lawyer.

THE INHERITANCE
From Louisa May Alcott comes this passionate story of forbidden love and dangerous rivalry in 19th century New England.

ROGUE TRADER
The thrilling true story of a futures trader (Ewan McGregor) who stole vast amounts of money from one of Britain's oldest financial institutions to cover his risky wagers.

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