GLAD -The Guided Language Acquisition Design


GLAD is a United States Department of Education, OBEMLA, Project of Academic Excellence; a California Department of Education Exemplary Program, a model reform program for the Comprehensive School Reform Design, and training model for five Achieving Schools Award Winners. It was the recommended K-8 project by the California State Superintendent of Schools for teachers of English learners. It is also highlighted as a California Department of Education “Best Practices” program for Title III professional development funding.

GLAD is a model of professional development in the area of language acquisition and literacy. The strategies and model promote English language acquisition, academic achievement, and cross-cultural skills.

Based on current areas of research, a brief summary of some strategies and classroom implications follows:

1. Teach to the Highest

• A classroom environment that values the student and provides authentic opportunities for use of academic language and maintains the highest standards and expectations for all students (Goodman, Shefelbine, Cummins, Smith, and Collier).


2. Brain Research--Metacognition

• A time to activate and focus prior knowledge; inquiry charts, brainstorming, and clustering (Costa, Rico, Kovalik).

• An opportunity to insure a common base of understanding and scaffolding, direct experiences, films, visuals, teacher read alouds (Krashen, Collier, Swain, Long, Vygotsky).

• Students taught how and encouraged to organize thoughts and texts utilizing multiple intelligences: graphic organizers, summaries, visuals, or contextual and semantic clues (Costa, Rico, Krashen, Long, Marzano, Gardner, Lazear).

• Metacognitive aspect of teacher and students modeling of how an answer was arrived at, not merely what the correct answer was (Costa, Farr, Sagor).


3. Brain Research and Second Language Acquisition

• A student set purpose for learning; motivating, stated result or goal; student choices; connections made between personal background knowledge and new learning, inquiry charts (High Scope, Hunter, Cummins, Wolfe).

• Chances to negotiate meaning from language and text; cooperative activities for problem-solving and social skills; heterogeneous homogeneous flexible groupings (Long, Kagan, Vygotsky, Cummins, Shefelbine).


4. Reading and Writing To, With, and By Students

• Reading that stresses the purpose and joy before the skills; beginning with writing and reading one’s own language; immense amounts of being read to; time for silent sustained reading and silent sustained writing with oral book sharing and quickshares (Goodman, Krashen, Flores, Traill, Shefelbine).

• Direct teaching of concepts, vocabulary, and necessary skills; text patterns, academic language, writing patterns; decoding skills (UCI Writing Project, Bettances, Chall, Reading Task Force, Marzano, Beck, Shefelbine, Adams).

• Writing that stresses the metacognitive use of reading and writing as a process; use of clustering/brainstorming to initiate writing; acceptance of developmental level of writer; editing and revising done in appropriate places in the process. No over-editing in early drafts; not all writing brought to editing stage; use of conferencing methods to guide student through the process; use of logs for personal responses to texts or issues; use of interactive journals (Goodman, Graves, Calkins, Rico, UCI Writing Project).

• Language functional environment; language charts, poetry kept on walls - read and used by students; reading and writing the walls daily. Big Books on walls, shared reading/writing experiences (Traill, Cummins, Flor Ada).


5. Active participation in all components of the unit, negotiating for meaning, comprehensible output personal interactions and 10/2 (Long, Cambourne, Cummins, Swain, Goldenburg, Costa)


6. A theme, year planning, and strategies that foster standards-based learning respect, trust, identity, and voice. The use of personal interaction values oral ideas and cross-cultural respect. (Cummins, Wiggins and McTighe, Berman, Baron).


7. Ongoing assessment and evaluation using a variety of tools to provide reflection on what has been learned, how it was learned and what will be done with the information. Assessment, ongoing and summative, based on strengths as well as needs. Direct teaching of test language and test taking skills. (Costa, Wiggens, Farr, Treadway, Lazear)

The GLAD model began in Fountain Valley.  Marcia Brechtel and her teaching partner, Linnea Haley, were challenged with multilingual classrooms filled with students from many different backgrounds.  The watered down ESL curriculum wasn't providing students with the academic language they needed for success. The GLAD model was created to fulfill the immediate need to teach students grade level academic content in a comprehensible way.

In 1991 the model was declared exemplary by the California Department of Education and a Project of Academic Excellence by the U.S. Department of Education, OBEMLA (Office of Bilingual Education and Minority Language Affairs).


GLAD is a model of professional development in the area of language acquisition and literacy. The strategies and model promote English language acquisition, academic achievement, and cross-cultural skills. GLAD was developed and field tested for nine years in the Fountain Valley School District and is based on years of experience with integrated approaches for teaching language. Tied to standards, the model trains teachers to provide access to core curriculum using local district guidelines and curriculum.

Guided Language Acquisition Design (GLAD)

The Issaquah School District

Guided Language Acquisition Design (GLAD) is an instructional model with clear, practical strategies that promote positive, effective interactions among students and between teachers and students. GLAD develops metacognitive use of high level academic language and literacy. The strategies used in the model promote English language acquisition, academic achievement, and cross-cultural skills. GLAD is a United States Department of Education, OBEMLA, Project of Academic Excellence.

GLAD provides an organizational structure for integrated, balanced literacy. The integration of listening, speaking, reading, and writing into all content areas underscores research that language is acquired most effectively when the emphasis is on meaning. Language, any language, should be acquired while studying something of interest or something that applies to real life.

When visiting a classroom using GLAD strategies, you will notice high-level vocabulary, and walls "dripping with language." The GLAD model provides a language-rich constructive environment that instills the love and fun of learning!


Ċ
Manuel F. Lara,
13 Jan 2011, 13:59
Comments