BROOKLANDS STEERING WHEEL : BROOKLANDS STEERING

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Brooklands Steering Wheel


brooklands steering wheel
    steering wheel
  • A steering wheel (also called a driving wheel or hand wheel) is a type of steering control in vehicles and vessels (ships and boats).
  • The wheel of a ship is the modern method of adjusting the angle of the rudder, in turn changing the direction of the boat or ship. It is also called the helm, together with the rest of the steering mechanism.
  • A wheel that a driver rotates in order to steer a vehicle
  • a handwheel that is used for steering
    brooklands
  • Brookland is a placename: ;in England *Brookland, Kent, England
  • Brooklands was a motor racing circuit and aerodrome built near Weybridge in Surrey, England. It opened in 1907, and was the world's first purpose-built motorsport venue, as well as one of Britain's first airfields.
  • (Brookland (Washington Metro)) Brookland-CUA is a Washington Metro station in Washington, D.C. on the Red Line. It is located in Northeast at Monroe & 9th Street near Michigan Avenue, and serves the Brookland neighborhood of Northeast Washington and The Catholic University of America.
brooklands steering wheel - Chevy El
Chevy El Camino and SS, 1959-1987
Chevy El Camino and SS, 1959-1987
This book tells the El Camino story through contemporary road and comparison tests plus model introductions and includes full technical and specification data. The El Camino made its debut in 1959 but was dropped between 1961 and 1963. The 1968 range was the first to carry a Super Sport option and the seventies also saw an estate derivative. Both disappeared after 1977 with the arrival of emissions regulations. Later models did not disappoint however, and the variants of the early eighties were to the forefront of the latest developments. Models covered: the 283, 327, 348, 305, 350, 396, SS 396, Trimatic, 454, 4100 auto, Turbo diesel and Super Sport.

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Riley Brooklands 1930
Riley Brooklands 1930
Belem, Lisbon, Portugal in Wikipedia Riley was a British motorcar and bicycle manufacturer from 1890. The company became part of the Nuffield Organisation in 1938 and was later merged into British Leyland: late in 1969 British Leyland announced their discontinuance of Riley production, although 1969 was a difficult year for the UK auto industry and so a number of cars from the company's inventory are likely to have been first registered only in 1970.[2] Today, the Riley trademark is owned by BMW. Riley Cycle Company Riley began as the Bonnick Cycle Company of Coventry, England. During the pedal cycle craze that swept Britain at the end of the nineteenth century, in 1890, William Riley Jr. purchased the company and in 1896 renamed it the Riley Cycle Company.[2] Later, cycle gear maker Sturmey Archer was added to the portfolio. Riley's younger son, Percy, left school in the same year and soon began to dabble in automobiles. He built his first car at 16, in 1898, secretly, because his father did not approve. It featured the first mechanically operated inlet valve. By 1899, Percy Riley moved from producing motorcycles to his first prototype four-wheeled quadricycle. Little is known about Percy Riley's very first "motor-car". It is, however, well attested that the engine featured mechanically operated cylinder valves at a time when other engines depended on the vacuum effect of the descending piston to suck the inlet valve(s) open. That was demonstrated some years later when Benz developed and patented a mechanically operated inlet valve process of their own but were unable to collect royalties on their system from British companies; the courts were persuaded that the system used by British auto-makers was based the one pioneered by Percy, which had comfortably anticipated equivalent developments in Germany.[2] In 1900, Riley sold a single three-wheeled automobile. Meanwhile the elder of the Riley brothers, Victor Riley, although supportive of his brother's embryonic motor-car enterprise, devoted his energies at this stage to the core bicycle business.[2] Company founder William Riley remained resolutely opposed to diverting the resources of his bicycle business into motor cars, and in 1902 three of his sons, Victor, Percy and younger brother Alan Riley pooled resources, borrowed a necessary balancing amount from their mother and in 1903 established the separate Riley Engine Company, also in Coventry.[2] A few years later the other two Riley brothers, Stanley and Cecil, having left school joined their elder brothers in the business.[2] At first, the Riley Engine Company simply supplied engines for Riley motorcycles and also to Singer, a newly emerging motor cycle manufacturer in the area,[2] but the Riley Engine Company company soon began to focus on four-wheeled automobiles. Their Vee-Twin Tourer prototype, produced in 1905, can be considered the first proper Riley car. The Engine Company expanded the next year. William Riley reversed his former opposition to his sons' preference for motorised vehicles and Riley Cycle halted motorcycle production in 1907 to focus on automobiles.[2] Bicycle production also ceased in 1911. In 1912, the Riley Cycle Company changed its name to Riley (Coventry) Limited as William Riley focused it on becoming a wire-spoked wheel supplier for the burgeoning motor industry, the detachable wheel having been invented (and patented) by Percy and distributed to over 180 motor manufacturers, and by 1912 the father's business had also dropped automobile manufacture in order to concentrate capacity and resources on the wheels. Exploitation of this new and rapidly expanding lucrative business sector made commercial sense for William Riley, but the abandonment of his motor-bicycle and then of his automobile business which had been the principal customer for his sons' Riley Engine Company enforced a rethink on the Engine Company.[2] Riley Motor Manufacturing In early 1913, Percy was joined by three of his brothers (Victor, Stanley, and Allan) in a new business focused on manufacturing entire automobiles. This Riley Motor Manufacturing Company was located near Percy's Riley Engine Company. The first new model, the 17/30, was introduced at the London Motor Show that year. Soon afterwards, Stanley Riley founded yet another company, the Nero Engine Company, to produce his own 4-cylinder 10 hp (7.5 kW) car. Riley also began manufacturing aeroplane engines and became a key supplier in Britain's buildup for World War I. In 1918, after the war, the Riley companies were restructured. Nero joined Riley (Coventry) as the sole producer of automobiles. Riley Motor Manufacturing came under the control of Allan Riley to become Midland Motor Bodies, a coachbuilder for Riley. Riley Engine Company continued under Percy as the engine supplier. At this time, Riley's blue diamond badge, designed by Harry Rush, also appeared. The motto was "As old as the industry, as modern as the hour. Rile
1939 BMW 328 Roadster
1939 BMW 328 Roadster
Here is the catalogue description from the RM Auction in Monterey where the car sold for $539,000 on August 13, 2010: 80 bhp, 1,971 cc overhead valve six-cylinder engine, four-speed manual transmission, independent front suspension with transverse leaf spring, live rear axle with semi-elliptic leaf springs, four-wheel hydraulic drum brakes. Wheelbase: 94.5" - Highly original example of one of BMW’s most desirable and sporting models - Formerly part of the Simeone Foundation Museum collection in Philadelphia - One of only 462 built through 1939 The Berlin Auto Show in 1936 was a pivotal event in BMW’s development, as it heralded the introduction of the 326, the company’s first four-door sedan, powered by a 50 bhp, 1,971 cc engine, capable of 72 mph. More streamlined than earlier BMWs, its styling would set the pattern for the marque until World War II and begat several variations that overshadowed the parent model – the 320, a cheaper four-cylinder car, and the 327, a short chassis, two-seat coupe or convertible. However, it was the sporting 328 that made the biggest news. The 328 had the same 1,971 cylinder block but a new cross-flow head with hemispherical combustion chambers and used short horizontal pushrods to operate opposed exhaust valves from the single camshaft. This gave twin-cam performance with less complexity and lower cost. A twin-tube chassis was used, topped with a two-seat sporting body. Top speed of the standard model was 96 mph, but the renowned British driver S.C.H. “Sammy” Davis clocked 102.16 at Brooklands in a lightweight prototype. Higher compression and ported heads gave even better performance. A streamlined 328 won the two-liter class at Le Mans in 1939, and the same car, part of a five-car team, won 1940s Mille Miglia outright. Just 462 were built through 1939, against nearly 16,000 of the “bread and butter” 326 cars. According to information provided by BMW historian Rainer Simons, this BMW 328, chassis 85406, was delivered new on May 12, 1939 to the BMW dealership of Helm Glockler in Frankfurt. Helm’s BMW business was originally a Dixi dealership which also began selling BMWs once Bayerishe Motoren Werke acquired the Dixi marque. Porsche enthusiasts will of course recognize the family name from his cousin Walter Glockler, the man responsible for the famous mid-engined Glockler-Porsche specials that ultimately inspired the creation of Porsche’s own 550 sports racers. Walter was also a successful car dealer in his own right and, in addition to dealing in BMWs, also sold Volkswagens and Porsches over the course of his career. Delivered new to Helm Glockler’s dealership, 85406 would then have been sold to its first private owner, finished in green from the factory. Later in its life it was owned by one Peter Dennis of Canada who, according to documentation and a registration sticker affixed to the windshield, kept the car in Nova Scotia. Mr. Dennis was the Canadian distributor for Lada cars during this time but also had a keen interest in BMWs. He ultimately sold the car in the 1970s to noted Philadelphia collector Dr. Fred Simeone, who added it to his growing collection of extraordinarily original collector cars, with a particular emphasis on racing cars. Dr. Simeone believes the car was restored in Canada during the 1960s, prior to his acquisition. In his collection, the car was maintained in its original condition with minor upgrades – certain smaller elements, like the steering wheel, were not original and were therefore replaced. It was always kept in indoor storage, and Dr. Simeone reported no mechanical trouble with the car over the course of his ownership. Following his opening of the Simeone Foundation Museum in Philadelphia, the car was housed in his climate-controlled museum building and, like all other cars in the collection, was regularly exercised on the building’s private lot and maintained by dedicated staff. As one of the earliest cars he acquired, it was witness to the growth of the Simeone collection into one of this country’s finest, sitting alongside such vaunted company as a Ferrari 250 Testa Rossa, Aston Martin DBR1, C-Type and D-Type Jaguars and an Alfa Romeo 8C, to name but a few extraordinary automobiles. Over the course of its life, the car has been refinished in white and the upholstery was redone, but otherwise the car is extremely original down to the chassis. Mr. Simeone reports, however, that the engine is not original to the car and comes from a BMW 326 (year 1937) that was mated to a 328 cylinder head but retains the original Solex IF30 carburetors. BMW 328s are very desirable collector cars but rarely change hands at auction. They are terrific event cars, from hillclimbs to rallyes, and are supported by a vast network of enthusiast owners alongside dedicated historians. This particular example has been maintained in superb original condition with the added sporting effect of the BMW-appropriate white finish. For enthusiasts of G

brooklands steering wheel
brooklands steering wheel
Brookland: A Novel
Since her girlhood, Prudence Winship has gazed across the tidal straits from her home in Brooklyn to the city of Manhattan and yearned to bridge the distance. Now, established as the owner of the enormously successful gin distillery she inherited from her father, she can begin to realize her dream.

Set in eighteenth-century Brooklyn, this is the story of a determined and intelligent woman who is consumed by a vision of a bridge: a gargantuan construction of timber and masonry she devises to cross the East River in a single, magnificent span. With the help of the local surveyor, Benjamin Horsfield, and her sisters—the high-spirited, obstreperous Tem, who works with her in the distillery, and the silent, uncanny Pearl—she fires the imaginations of the people of Brooklyn and New York by promising them a bridge that will meet their most pressing practical needs while being one of the most ambitious public works ever attempted. Prue’s own life and the life of the bridge become inextricably bound together as the costs of the bridge, both financial and human, rise beyond her direst expectations.

Brookland confirms Emily Barton’s reputation as one of the finest writers of her generation, whose work is ”blessedly post-ironic, engaging and heartfelt” (Thomas Pynchon).

Since her girlhood, Prudence Winship has gazed across the tidal straits from her home in Brooklyn to the city of Manhattan and yearned to bridge the distance. Now, established as the owner of the enormously successful gin distillery she inherited from her father, she can begin to realize her dream.

Set in eighteenth-century Brooklyn, this is the story of a determined and intelligent woman who is consumed by a vision of a bridge: a gargantuan construction of timber and masonry she devises to cross the East River in a single, magnificent span. With the help of the local surveyor, Benjamin Horsfield, and her sisters—the high-spirited, obstreperous Tem, who works with her in the distillery, and the silent, uncanny Pearl—she fires the imaginations of the people of Brooklyn and New York by promising them a bridge that will meet their most pressing practical needs while being one of the most ambitious public works ever attempted. Prue’s own life and the life of the bridge become inextricably bound together as the costs of the bridge, both financial and human, rise beyond her direst expectations.

Brookland confirms Emily Barton’s reputation as one of the finest writers of her generation, whose work is ”blessedly post-ironic, engaging and heartfelt” (Thomas Pynchon).

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