DISNEY GIRLS BIKE : GIRLS BIKE

DISNEY GIRLS BIKE : BIKE OUTLET ONLINE : MOUNTAIN BIKE TRAILS MELBOURNE

Disney Girls Bike


disney girls bike
    disney girls
  • "Disney Girls (1957)" is a song written by Bruce Johnston for the American pop band The Beach Boys. It was released on their 1971 album Surf's Up. The lead vocals are by Johnston, who also plays keyboards, moog bass, and mandolin.
    bike
  • bicycle: ride a bicycle
  • A bicycle or motorcycle
  • bicycle: a wheeled vehicle that has two wheels and is moved by foot pedals
  • motorcycle: a motor vehicle with two wheels and a strong frame
disney girls bike - Motocrossed [VHS]
Motocrossed [VHS]
Motocrossed [VHS]
The wild world of motocross racing takes an unexpected turn in this action-packed Disney Channel Original Movie. Fifteen-year-old Andrew Carson is gearing up for the championship race that could win him a corporate sponsorship. Certain he'll pull out a victory, his dad sinks the family finances into the race. Meanwhile, twin sister Andrea (Alana Austin, NO PLACE LIKE HOME), also a skilled rider, helps him train on the track, even though their dad would rather see her stick to cheerleading. When Andrew breaks his leg squaring off against Andrea, she blames herself and vows to set things right. That means disguising herself as a guy and entering the race ... as Andrew! But the course hides obstacles she isn't expecting -- like falling for a fellow competitor and learning her dad has discovered the truth! Also starring Scott Terra (TV's 7TH HEAVEN) and Mary-Margaret Humes (TV's DAWSON'S CREEK), MOTOCROSSED drives you all the way to an edge-of-your-seat finish.

As premises for preteen flicks go, the identity swap went flat way back when, post-Freaky Friday. Throw in a threesome of pinup-worthy actors, a sport that lends itself to rock-song spiked footage, and a sprinkling of old-fashioned rebelliousness, though, and suddenly the bubbles are back. Motocrossed kicks up a gender-bending mess as cheerleader Andrea (Alana Austin) lops off her golden locks to enter a motocross race as her brother, Andrew, who's injured and can't compete. Mom's complicit, but if Dad, who clearly hasn't screened Yentl in a while, finds out, it's yike-a-roo. Complicating matters and upping race-day tummy rumbling is the crush Andi develops on one of her hoodwinked competitors. In the end--guess what--girls rule, but this movie made for Disney TV manages to ride into the sunset without its predictability flattening what's essentially 90 minutes of frothy, wide-eyed fun. --Tammy La Gorce

79% (13)
Girls Hockey, Then and Now
Girls Hockey, Then and Now
Photo 47/365 I covered the East Regional Final for Maine girls hockey last night in Portland. I'll post the link to my story later. It is fun to see how far girls hockey has come. A little over five-years ago I wrote a feature story about girls hockey. At the time it was not a sanctioned sport by the Maine Principals Association. Now, for the third year, it is. My old story (I hate my old stories) was written for Current Publishing and appeared in their chain or weekly papers, the American Journal, Current, Sun Chronicle, Lakes Region Weekly, Reporter and Weekly Observer. With the power of google, I found it. Here it is (sorry, it's kind of long): January 11, 2007 Salchows to slapshots, girls hockey growing By Keith B. Wehmeyer When Ashley Potvin first put on skates they were of the figure skating variety, but at seven, to the chagrin of her mother, she began switching to hockey. Now as a senior at Biddeford High School the figure skates are long gone. Potvin is in her fourth year playing for Biddeford's girls' ice hockey team. This year she has helped her squad to a 7-0 start. She's not alone. Girls all over southern Maine are joining a growing number of high school girls ice hockey teams, playing a sport that may soon be officially sanctioned by the Maine Principals Association. So where's Potvins' Mom now? Just over the boards, barking orders from the bench as Biddeford's head coach. "When we started a girls program, I was the girls' director," said Marie Potvin, who has been coaching the Biddeford team since its inception four years ago. "I decided to take a coaching clinic because we were looking to start the next step, a high school program." Marie's son Matt played hockey at Biddeford, helping peak his sister's interest in the sport. Ashley now plays on three teams - Biddeford's girls' team, the boy's junior varsity team and a girls' under-19 select team. Still, she hasn't forgotten her roots. Ashley's teammates at Biddeford have witnessed her breaking out her figuring skating moves from time to time in practice. "I can do waltz jump, salchow and some spins," she said. But never during games. "I don't pull out any Mighty Ducks stuff," she said, referring to the Disney movie. While Potvin simply changed her skates, girls are transitioning to ice hockey in a variety of ways. Scarborough senior Annie Bolton began playing as a freshman with an interest that stemmed from field hockey. "I played field hockey with a lot of the girls on the ice hockey team and they suggested I try skating with them during fall and play with them on the ice hockey team," Bolton said. Like a lot of girls who began ice hockey as freshman, Bolton had never skated before, setting up a scenario that's like learning to walk and play soccer at the same time. "The coaches were great and all of the girls that had been playing awhile helped with techniques and what works best with them," Bolton said. "Now it's like riding a bike." Bolton plays offense during ice hockey season, left wing to be exact, and defense during field hockey. She enjoys the transition between the two sports and the two positions and can't pick a favorite between them. "I like them both the same," she said. "In ice hockey the shifts are a lot quicker; the way we work as a team on the ice is different." Teammate Erika Schneller isn't as diplomatic. "I definitely like ice hockey a lot better,' said Schneller, a junior. "I feel more involved with the team and in the sport itself. My whole family has been really into (ice) hockey since I was born. It's more natural for me I think." Personally I like the speed of the game. It's a lot quicker than most sports and it can change so fast. I love that. Its one of the first sports I felt completely comfortable playing; everything flows." Scheneller is the goalie for Scarborough's field hockey team; she plays defense when on the ice and hopes to play ice hockey in college. There are currently 21 teams playing as part of the Maine Girls Ice Hockey Association, including teams from Gorham, Scarborough, Cape Elizabeth and Biddeford. In order for the Maine Principals Association to officially recognize girls' ice hockey as a varsity sport, 10 teams need to be officially sanctioned by their school boards and have a letter sent to the MPA requesting the sport be recognized. That number is currently at eight. According to Cape Elizabeth athletic director Keith Weatherbie, reaching the magic number of 10 is just a matter of time. Teams throughout the area are at various stages of the process. Scarborough is sanctioned by its school board, receives funding and is by most accounts treated as equal to all the other sports. "I have the best athletic director you could ask for," Scarborough coach Bre Fortiguerra said. "He is so fair to us, splitting things down the middle as far as
The Birthday Girl
The Birthday Girl
Today my little girl turned seven. I can't believe that she is seven already. It doesn't seem that long ago that she was an infant. Now, she starts second grade in a little over a week. Why do they grow up so fast?!?!?! As shell shocked as I am over her turning seven way before I was ready, I'm so proud of the little lady she has become. She had herself quite the day. I took a half day at work so I could get to my mom and dad's house and celebrate her actual birthday with her. She was very excited that Kathy and I were there for the afternoon. My mom took her swimming and afterward she got to go biking. Then it was a dinner of her choosing (spaghetti) and a cake that was not only really tasty, but was made by her and my mother. We are celebrating her birthday on Sunday with her friends, but she still got a few gifts tonight. She was really excited about her two new Webkinz and the Disney Princesses bike equipment she got. All in all, she had a great day and that is what it is all about.

disney girls bike
disney girls bike
Buggyguard Retractable Stroller Lock, Hippo
Buggy Guard Retractable Stroller Lock - Hippo
Going to a theme park, zoo, restaurant, or traveling somewhere? Now you can protect your investment when you have to leave your stroller unattended. This lightweight yet high strength stroller lock will secure your stroller and grant you peace of mind so you can focus on what matters most - your kids! The buggyguard was engineered for safe, smart, on-the-go parents. The buggyguard is full of unique stroller specific features. It includes a universal attachment so it's always ready to use on your stroller - Your diaper bag is cluttered enough. Push-button retraction so you can weave through wheels and recoil back easily. An extended 4 1/2 foot high strength stainless steel cable long enough to go around 2 wheels of you buggy - longest retractable cable ever made. Parents create a three digit unique code with the resettable combination dials so you don't have to worry about lossing keys. And finally it's customizable with 3 different bow-ties to color coordinate to your liking. Simply Velcro the Buggyguard to any part of the stroller handlebar or frame so it's ready to use when you need it. Lock your stroller to a stationary object (i.e. park bench, fence, tree or light pole), or simply to itself by locking wheels in place. Cute on the outside and tough on the inside, the buggyguard is low profile so most wouldn't even notice it. If you love it, lock it!

Comments