FOLD UP BIKES FOR SALE - FOLD UP BIKES

Fold up bikes for sale - Mountain bike kick stand.

Fold Up Bikes For Sale


fold up bikes for sale
    for sale
  • purchasable: available for purchase; "purchasable goods"; "many houses in the area are for sale"
  • For Sale is the fifth album by German pop band Fool's Garden, released in 2000.
  • For Sale is a tour EP by Say Anything. It contains 3 songs from …Is a Real Boy and 2 additional b-sides that were left off the album.
    fold up
  • fold: bend or lay so that one part covers the other; "fold up the newspaper"; "turn up your collar"
  • fold: become folded or folded up; "The bed folds in a jiffy"
    bikes
  • (bike) motorcycle: a motor vehicle with two wheels and a strong frame
  • A bicycle or motorcycle
  • (bike) bicycle: ride a bicycle
  • (bike) bicycle: a wheeled vehicle that has two wheels and is moved by foot pedals
fold up bikes for sale - Thule 914XT
Thule 914XT Roadway 4 Bike Hitch Carrier
Thule 914XT Roadway 4 Bike Hitch Carrier
Durable hanging hitch carrier with antisway cradles and convenient Hitch Switch lever releases to fold arms and carrier.

The Thule 915XT Roadway 5-Bike Hitch Carrier has the largest transporting capacity in Thule's popular Roadway product line. A great all-around hitch carrier, it is designed to support and transport up to five bicycles, weighing up to a maximum total weight of 150 lbs, conveniently at the rear of your vehicle using your 2 inch hitch receiver. Features include: carrier arms with the capability to fold down when not in use as well as away from the vehicle to allow access to vehicle back openings, heavy-duty construction and carrier arm cradles with detachable anti-sway components built in for each bike mounted.
Thule 915XT Roadway 5-Bike Hitch Carrier mounted on a car
5 bikes - the largest capacity in Thule's Roadway product line.
View larger. Thule 915XT Roadway 5-Bike Hitch Carrier with empty carrier arms folded down
Hitch Switch functionality folds arms up tight to your vehicle when not in use.
View larger. Thule 915XT Roadway 5-Bike Hitch Carrier with empty carrier arms folded back for access to a hatchback
Hitch Switch also allows you to angle the upright structure of the carrier back for access to hatchbacks
View larger.
The New Standard for Performance and Ease of Use
Designed for maximum load carrying, the Roadway 5-Bike Hitch Carrier accommodates up to five bikes utilizing 2 inch hitch receivers at the tail end of your vehicle (1? receiver connections not supported). It is also incredibly strong, stable and full featured, with durable high-strength steel construction and varied standard components, including: Stay-Put cradles with detachable anti-sway cages that prevent bike-to-bike and bike-to-vehicle contact which dramatically reduces the chance of scratches to vehicles and bikes.
In addition, by way of its easy-to-use Hitch Switch lever, the Roadway 5-Bike Hitch Carrier has the ability to fold its carrier arms down at the push of a button when not in use and even tilt the carrier's upright structure away from vehicle, allowing for hatch or tailgate access (bikes must be removed first). This means that you can get to every corner of your vehicle when you want to, without having to remove the carrier. This ability to fold carrier arms also makes it unnecessary to remove an unloaded carrier in order to effectively perform everyday driving tasks like parking. Also impressive is the Roadway's virtually tool-free assembly. This makes installation a breeze and removal just as fast when the need to do so eventually comes.
Key Features
Transports up to 5 bikes via a connection to your vehicle's 2 inch hitch receiver (1? receiver connections not supported)
Stay-Put cradles with detachable anti-sway cages prevent bike-to-bike and bike-to-vehicle contact
Hitch Switch lever tilts carrier away from vehicle for hatch or tailgate access
Available in 2-bike, 4-bike and 5-bike hitch racks
Durable high-strength steel construction
Optional locking functional available with 6 ft. braided steel cable (#538) that locks bikes to the carrier or the Snug-Tite receiver lock which virtually eliminates hitch rack movement in receivers and locks the hitch rack to the vehicle (both sold separately)
Specifications
Load Capacity - 5 bikes
Fits 1? inch Hitch Receivers - No
Fits 2 inch Hitch Receivers - 1
One-Key System Compatible - Yes
Fits Most Bikes with Disc Brakes - Yes
For Tandem Bikes - No
What's in the Box
Thule 915XT Roadway 5-Bike Hitch Carrier, all necessary mounting hardware/tools, and instruction guide and warranty information.
Limited Lifetime Warranty
Thule will warranty all Thule brand car rack systems and its accessories manufactured by Thule during the time that an original retail purchaser owns the product. This warranty terminates if a purchaser transfers the product to any other person. No warranty is given for defects caused by normal wear and tear, cosmetic rust, scratches, accidents, unlawful vehicle operation, or modification of, or any types of repair of a load carrier system other than those authorized by Thule.
About Thule
Thule was founded in 1942 by the Thulin family, when Eric Thulin, a true lover of the outdoors, put the Thule name on a pike trap he designed and began to sell in Scandinavia. It wasn't long before he added other practical items to the company's portfolio. By the 1960s, the company began to concentrate on car-related products, including its first roof rack. The Thulin family sold Thule to the publicly listed company Eldon in 1979, and it has continued to grow both organically and through acquisitions ever since. The Thule Group is a world leader in providing transport solutions for an active life.

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500 Mile bike ride to Idaho, Sept - Oct 2007
500 Mile bike ride to Idaho, Sept - Oct 2007
P9260307. Photo: Biking Northern Idaho. PIcking up a few postcards. My new bike basket.. A Bike tour From Portland (Troutdale) to Bonner's Ferry, Idaho. Eleven days of riding 530 miles (plus 40 miles of hitching). The return was made on the Empire Builder Amtrak train at Sandpoint, ID. For the tour Matt and Carye bought new custom built Bike Friday (www.bikefriday.com) folding bikes that are made in Eugene, Oregon. Neither Carye or Matt own cars, so investing in a reliable, flexible bike for travel was important. However the bikes arrived two days before leaving, so getting used to new bikes while on the road, was literally a pain in the butt! By the end of the trip, gears, seat and handle bar placement, and proper riding shoes were figured out. Everyday of the ride had awesome weather (not too hot, not rainy), and Carye and Matt met many friendly people, ate as much pizza and icecream as desired, and enjoyed some beautiful scenery (though Washington wheat fields get dull to the eyes after 20 miles). The fourth day brought bad luck - 4 flats (at once!) caused by Goathead thorns, and wind in the face most the day. Also a family of earwigs hitched a ride in C & M's camping gear, and it took about a week to finally see the last one. Idaho is a cyclist paradise (what a secret). From The State Border near Coere D'Alene to just before Bonner's Ferry, there were many bike paths, nice scenery, and most flat routes. Day 1:Troutdale to Hood River (55.6 miles) Highlights: Gorgeous Columbia River (Get the bike map from ODOT). Ride to Council Crest, Ride by Falls, bike-ped paths on the old historic highway. The campground listed on the bike map for Hood River was not there. We decided to treat ourselves and stayed at the Hood River downtown hotel. Hood River is a super nice town - though sad the Carousel Art Museum is closed and moving elsewhere. Also on this route, between Cascade Locks and Wyeth, do not take the Wyeth Bench Rd (aka Herman Creek Rd), it is a horrible grade hill, and you are better off taking the I-84. Note about I-84, it's not the most pleasant experience, but it's not bad, In order to bike to Hood River, you will need to get on I-84 at several points - The shoulder is pretty wide at most places, and it's a good idea to wear some bright orange! Day 2: Hood River to Maryhill, WA (52.5 miles) Highlights: The old historic highway section is really neat: it goes through the Mosier Tunnels (now just for ped/bike), The section through Mosier town, and to Rowena's Crest was on low traffic streets. No need to get on I-84 at all all the way to the Dalles. The crossing over to Washington on the bridge in the Dalles was difficult. It was so windy and the sidewalk so narrow we had to walk. Biking to hwy 14 across the wind was also difficult. But once on hwy 14 heading East, the wind was at our bikes, and we cruised past the Maryhill Museum (Too late in the day to stop!) and stayed at the Maryhill State Park (back down by the river). Day 3: Maryhill to Crow Butte (58.2 miles) Highlights: Cruising sometimes 20 miles an hour easily with the wind at our back on Hwy 14. Lovely more deserty scenery, waving to trains. A Stop at Stonehenge. From the campground, we hitched a ride in a pickup back up the top of the hill to hwy 14. The road was a major truck route, and the shoulder was pretty much missing for the first section of the hill, we decided htiching was the safest option. We enjoyed stopping at America's Stonehenge. I had been there before, but never thought I'd bike all the way! Crow Butte park was father than we thought. We could see it, but then had to ride about 4 miles all the way around and out to it. The RV park was expensive, and did not offer "primitive camper" sites. Day 4: Crow Butte, WA to Hat Rock Park, OR Highlights: Early morning hike past deer to the top of Crow Butte. Discovering the way over the I-82 - there is a bike route, but you need to go on the may freeway before the bike route appears, then you exit, cross under and go over on the otherside. Umatilla was nice little town to check out. At first we were excited about the Lewis & Clark Bike/Ped Bath, but it turned into a bad situation. The wind in the gorge changed from E to W today, so we had to push hard for 20 miles, going about 5-8 miles an hour. Very hard reality after the day before. The road moved away from the Gorge and was now less interesting. Onion (Walla Walla) trucks passed us all day, leaving onion skin trails. We crossed back to Oregon, and instead of the main road decided to follow the Lewis & Clark trail to Hat Rock State Park. Unfortunately it turned into a bad idea. The path was badly marked and kept changing from paved to shared road, to bark-dirt to gravel. After a gravel section we discovered that we had rode through thorns and had 4 flats at once. We pulled out 15-30 thorns and only had two new tubes, One tube needed to be patched 7 times. We were able to ride out to the main road
Over 500 miles bike ride to Idaho. Sept - Oct 2007
Over 500 miles bike ride to Idaho. Sept - Oct 2007
P9170148. Photo: folded bikes. Hoodriver, Oregon A Bike tour From Portland (Troutdale) to Bonner's Ferry, Idaho. Eleven days of riding 530 miles (plus 40 miles of hitching). The return was made on the Empire Builder Amtrak train at Sandpoint, ID. For the tour Matt and Carye bought new custom built Bike Friday (www.bikefriday.com) folding bikes that are made in Eugene, Oregon. Neither Carye or Matt own cars, so investing in a reliable, flexible bike for travel was important. However the bikes arrived two days before leaving, so getting used to new bikes while on the road, was literally a pain in the butt! By the end of the trip, gears, seat and handle bar placement, and proper riding shoes were figured out. Everyday of the ride had awesome weather (not too hot, not rainy), and Carye and Matt met many friendly people, ate as much pizza and icecream as desired, and enjoyed some beautiful scenery (though Washington wheat fields get dull to the eyes after 20 miles). The fourth day brought bad luck - 4 flats (at once!) caused by Goathead thorns, and wind in the face most the day. Also a family of earwigs hitched a ride in C & M's camping gear, and it took about a week to finally see the last one. Idaho is a cyclist paradise (what a secret). From The State Border near Coere D'Alene to just before Bonner's Ferry, there were many bike paths, nice scenery, and most flat routes. Day 1:Troutdale to Hood River (55.6 miles) Highlights: Gorgeous Columbia River (Get the bike map from ODOT). Ride to Council Crest, Ride by Falls, bike-ped paths on the old historic highway. The campground listed on the bike map for Hood River was not there. We decided to treat ourselves and stayed at the Hood River downtown hotel. Hood River is a super nice town - though sad the Carousel Art Museum is closed and moving elsewhere. Also on this route, between Cascade Locks and Wyeth, do not take the Wyeth Bench Rd (aka Herman Creek Rd), it is a horrible grade hill, and you are better off taking the I-84. Note about I-84, it's not the most pleasant experience, but it's not bad, In order to bike to Hood River, you will need to get on I-84 at several points - The shoulder is pretty wide at most places, and it's a good idea to wear some bright orange! Day 2: Hood River to Maryhill, WA (52.5 miles) Highlights: The old historic highway section is really neat: it goes through the Mosier Tunnels (now just for ped/bike), The section through Mosier town, and to Rowena's Crest was on low traffic streets. No need to get on I-84 at all all the way to the Dalles. The crossing over to Washington on the bridge in the Dalles was difficult. It was so windy and the sidewalk so narrow we had to walk. Biking to hwy 14 across the wind was also difficult. But once on hwy 14 heading East, the wind was at our bikes, and we cruised past the Maryhill Museum (Too late in the day to stop!) and stayed at the Maryhill State Park (back down by the river). Day 3: Maryhill to Crow Butte (58.2 miles) Highlights: Cruising sometimes 20 miles an hour easily with the wind at our back on Hwy 14. Lovely more deserty scenery, waving to trains. A Stop at Stonehenge. From the campground, we hitched a ride in a pickup back up the top of the hill to hwy 14. The road was a major truck route, and the shoulder was pretty much missing for the first section of the hill, we decided htiching was the safest option. We enjoyed stopping at America's Stonehenge. I had been there before, but never thought I'd bike all the way! Crow Butte park was father than we thought. We could see it, but then had to ride about 4 miles all the way around and out to it. The RV park was expensive, and did not offer "primitive camper" sites. Day 4: Crow Butte, WA to Hat Rock Park, OR Highlights: Early morning hike past deer to the top of Crow Butte. Discovering the way over the I-82 - there is a bike route, but you need to go on the may freeway before the bike route appears, then you exit, cross under and go over on the otherside. Umatilla was nice little town to check out. At first we were excited about the Lewis & Clark Bike/Ped Bath, but it turned into a bad situation. The wind in the gorge changed from E to W today, so we had to push hard for 20 miles, going about 5-8 miles an hour. Very hard reality after the day before. The road moved away from the Gorge and was now less interesting. Onion (Walla Walla) trucks passed us all day, leaving onion skin trails. We crossed back to Oregon, and instead of the main road decided to follow the Lewis & Clark trail to Hat Rock State Park. Unfortunately it turned into a bad idea. The path was badly marked and kept changing from paved to shared road, to bark-dirt to gravel. After a gravel section we discovered that we had rode through thorns and had 4 flats at once. We pulled out 15-30 thorns and only had two new tubes, One tube needed to be patched 7 times. We were able to ride out to the main road and hitched a ride with a priest. The St

fold up bikes for sale
fold up bikes for sale
Verso Cologne 7-Speed Folding Bike (Cobalt Blue, 20-Inch)
The Verso Cologne does everything you’d expect from a top-of-the-line hybrid folding bicycle: it folds within seconds, is extremely light weight, and compact enough to fit almost anywhere. But where it really excels is how smooth it rides. It's ergonomically designed frame is reassuringly stable. A mixture of high end components make up the drive train which provides all the gears you'll need on any commute, errand or leisurely ride. Durable Kenda Kwick tires are fast, smooth and easy to accelerate. Ride the Cologne and you'll instantly realize the fun you've been missing and ease at which it adapts to your riding, whether it be commuting, recreational or just riding to the corner grocery store. When your done riding at the end of the day, just fold up the Verso Cologne in in the included folding bike bag and store it away until you're ready to ride again.

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