CO CANAL BIKE PATH. BIKE PATH

CO CANAL BIKE PATH. ELECTRIC BICYCLE MOTORS KITS. SILCA BIKE PUMP

Co Canal Bike Path


co canal bike path
    bike path
  • A path or road for bicycles and not motor vehicles
  • A path segregated from motorized traffic for the use of bikes, sometimes shared with pedestrians.
  • Segregated cycle facilities are roads, tracks, paths or marked lanes designated for use by cyclists from which motorised traffic is generally excluded.
  • Completed in 1995, formerly an old railroad route between Elyria and Kipton, Ohio, that is popular with Oberlin’s cyclists, joggers, and dog walkers. Stretches 3.2 miles and was incorporated into the Lorain County Metro Park System as part of the North Coast Inland Trail bike path.
    canal
  • An artificial waterway constructed to allow the passage of boats or ships inland or to convey water for irrigation
  • A tubular duct in a plant or animal, serving to convey or contain food, liquid, or air
  • duct: a bodily passage or tube lined with epithelial cells and conveying a secretion or other substance; "the tear duct was obstructed"; "the alimentary canal"; "poison is released through a channel in the snake's fangs"
  • Any of a number of linear markings formerly reported as seen by telescope on the planet Mars
  • (astronomy) an indistinct surface feature of Mars once thought to be a system of channels; they are now believed to be an optical illusion
  • provide (a city) with a canal
co canal bike path - The Canal
The Canal
The Canal
An electrifying debut novel that becomes a shocking tale about... boredom

In a deeply compelling debut novel, Lee Rourke—a British underground sensation for his story collection Everyday—tells the tale of a man who finds his life so boring it frightens him. So he quits his job to spend some time sitting on a bench beside a quiet canal in a placid London neighborhood, watching the swans in the water and the people in the glass-fronted offices across the way while he collects himself.

However his solace is soon interupted when a jittery young woman begins to show up and sit beside him every day. Although she won't even tell him her name, she slowly begins to tell him a chilling story about a terrible act she committed, something for which she just can't forgive herself—and which seems to have involved one of the men they can see working in the building across the canal.

Torn by fear and pity, the man becomes more immersed in her tale, and finds that boredom has, indeed, brought him to the most terrifying place he's ever been.

84% (19)
Rambling Through Kildare
Rambling Through Kildare
The 140 year old barge Rambler picks up speed as she heads towards the 15th lock on the Royal Canal having just been raised in the 14th lock (just visible in the background). This stretch of the canal is very beautiful as it cuts through the flat rural Co. Kildare countryside between Maynooth and Kilcock. Thankfully even at full speed these barges are slower than a 30 year-old on a mountain bike, so I was able to pull ahead of her again and get a few more shots after this one.
John Brown's last stand
John Brown's last stand
Earlier this week I did DC to Pittsburgh on the C&O Canal and Allegheny Passage. Over 300 miles of dedicated bike path. These are some small snippets.

co canal bike path
co canal bike path
Wedding of the Waters: The Erie Canal and the Making of a Great Nation
"One corner of the great American panorama enlarged to highlight starry-eyed visionaries, political machinations, indefatigable ingenuity, and cockeyed optimism." --Kirkus Reviews
A sweeping work of history by Peter L. Bernstein, Wedding of the Waters recounts the revolutionary conception, construction, and completion of the Erie Canal, one of the greatest engineering projects ever undertaken and the crucial link between the Atlantic states and the bounties of the western lands beyond the Appalachian Mountains. This stupendous project was a daunting challenge at every turn, for the financiers and politicians as well as the would-be engineers. With its emphasis on technological ingenuity, global economics, financial skills, and America's changing role in the world, Wedding of the Waters is a story for our own times.

Begun in 1817 and completed in 1825, the Erie Canal stretches 363 miles across upstate New York from Buffalo on Lake Erie to Albany on the Hudson River. A stunning achievement, the canal was hacked through a densely forested pass in the Appalachian Mountains using only axes, shovels, low-grade explosive power, beasts of burden, and some ingenious devices. The engineers and workers created locks, bypassed rapids and waterfalls, and adjusted to countless changes in elevation. When the canal was completed it became one of the wonders of the world. But the canal was much more than a spectacular construction project; it also served to bind a young United States to itself and the rest of the world in one bold stroke. In this thoroughly absorbing book, Peter Bernstein describes in vivid detail how the Erie Canal helped to shape the United States into a great nation by connecting the eastern seaboard and western expanses of America, as well as propel the Industrial Revolution and stimulate global trade, economics, and immigration. It was so important to the development of the U.S., argues Bernstein, that without the canal the detached western territories "would in all likelihood have broken away" and created another, if not several, separate countries. Manifest Destiny would have been denied.
In telling this gripping tale, the author offers a brief history of canals through the ages, explains the foresight exhibited by George Washington and Thomas Jefferson regarding the need for a waterway to the west, and outlines the political wars, financing challenges, and seemingly endless delays and false starts to the project. He also reveals much about the political landscape of early America through his profiles of the personalities and visionaries who devoted their lives to the project, along with the engineers and surveyors, most of whom had little experience designing or constructing a canal of any kind, much less such a massive undertaking. Wedding of the Waters succeeds brilliantly in bringing this rich story to life. --Shawn Carkonen

"One corner of the great American panorama enlarged to highlight starry-eyed visionaries, political machinations, indefatigable ingenuity, and cockeyed optimism." --Kirkus Reviews
A sweeping work of history by Peter L. Bernstein, Wedding of the Waters recounts the revolutionary conception, construction, and completion of the Erie Canal, one of the greatest engineering projects ever undertaken and the crucial link between the Atlantic states and the bounties of the western lands beyond the Appalachian Mountains. This stupendous project was a daunting challenge at every turn, for the financiers and politicians as well as the would-be engineers. With its emphasis on technological ingenuity, global economics, financial skills, and America's changing role in the world, Wedding of the Waters is a story for our own times.

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