SPINNING BIKE BRANDS. SPINNING BIKE

SPINNING BIKE BRANDS. ROAD BICYCLE REVIEW. COMPARE SPECIALIZED BIKES

Spinning Bike Brands


spinning bike brands
    spinning
  • (spin) revolve quickly and repeatedly around one's own axis; "The dervishes whirl around and around without getting dizzy"
  • The action or process of converting fibers into thread or yarn
  • creating thread
  • (spin) a swift whirling motion (usually of a missile)
    brands
  • Mark (an animal, formerly a criminal or slave) with a branding iron
  • Mark indelibly
  • Describe (someone or something) as something bad or shameful
  • (brand) trade name: a name given to a product or service
  • (brand) a recognizable kind; "there's a new brand of hero in the movies now"; "what make of car is that?"
  • (brand) burn with a branding iron to indicate ownership; of animals
    bike
  • A bicycle or motorcycle
  • bicycle: ride a bicycle
  • motorcycle: a motor vehicle with two wheels and a strong frame
  • bicycle: a wheeled vehicle that has two wheels and is moved by foot pedals
spinning bike brands - Phoenix 98623
Phoenix 98623 Revolution Cycle Pro II Exercise Bike
Phoenix 98623 Revolution Cycle Pro II Exercise Bike
The modern-looking Revolution Cycle Pro II has advanced features such as ? Direct Drive Resistance System, Emergency Stop Brake System, Adjustable Seats/Handlebars, and Easy Transportation. This revolutionary product is designed for an energetic and challenging workout, and is also adapted to people with different intensity needs. Unlike road bikes, the flywheel does not continue to spin if the rider stops pedaling. The rider slows the flywheel and controls the tension with a tension knob. A two-way adjustable seat post allows for a more complete and versatile exercise routine. This seat system was specifically designed for easy movement horizontally and vertically while mounted on the bike during the workout. Adjustable forward positioned handlebars and racing style pedals give the Revolution Cycle Pro II a road bike feel.

The modern-looking Revolution Cycle Pro II is designed for an energetic and challenging workout, with such features as a direct-drive resistance system, an emergency stop brake system, and an adjustable seat and handlebars. Unlike with road bikes, the 39.6-pound balanced flywheel on the Revolution Cycle Pro II doesn't continue to spin if the rider stops pedaling. Instead, the rider slows the flywheel and controls the tension with a tension knob, helping the bike adapt to people with different intensity needs. The direct-drive system, meanwhile, lets the rider pedal either forward or backward during the workout, with a quick-stop handle serving as an instant brake for changing directions or in case of emergency. Most importantly, the Revolution Cycle Pro I is biomechanically efficient, with a two-way adjustable seat post that moves vertically and horizontally while you're mounted on the bike, along with an adjustable handlebar. As a result, you can drop the saddle down and out of the way to work the inner thigh, or perform other legwork off the back of the bike.
Other details include a heavy-duty brake pad resistance system with center-pull brake pads, front wheels for easy transport, sturdy toe clips made of the same alloy materials used in off-road racing, a heat-treated axle, a water bottle, and a weight capacity of 250 pounds. The Revolution Cycle Pro II measures 24 by 42.5 by 42.3 inches (W x H x D) and weighs 113 pounds.
About Exercise Bikes
Despite the competition from trendy new fitness inventions, exercise bikes continue to be popular options for home exercise. They offer the same aerobic benefits of riding a bicycle at any time, in any weather, without leaving the comfort and safety of home. Exercise bikes don't take up much space, require little or no balance or coordination, and can provide an effective workout for all levels of users, from beginners to serious competitors. While the same could be said for a number of other types of home fitness equipment, the exercise bike is one of the few that allows you to watch television or read a magazine while you work out. For many people, having convenient access to quality exercise equipment is critical to sticking with a long-term exercise program.

76% (5)
Yamaha demo, Gettysburg PA
Yamaha demo, Gettysburg PA
[BB9550] So finally the Yamaha demo team at Gettysburg and I were on the same page. Almost. But they did let me ride the R1 twice in a row and then the FZ8...apparently they were technically unable to unload the FZ1 from the truck due to the lack of a forklift. So I dithered and finally made my way back to Baltimore to catch the end of the Yamaha demo there (racing 65 miles through rural Pennsylvania and Maryland traffic in 1-1/2 hrs...) and got lucky, they set the last ride to 3:30pm and they bumped the guy who had the FZ1 already reserved, just so that I could ride it. He didn't mind, he would rather have ridden the Shadow? anyway, so I happily took the FZ1 out for a spin again this time on a dry road in sunny weather. By the way the Gettysburg demo was the same 7 miles as the Baltimore demo...except the Gettysburg demo included only maybe a few blocks of suburban road and just a few stoplights plus it started with a two-mile blast up Rte15 east of Gettysburg. Most of it was two-lane road through farm country. Yet again, less than a half-mile away from the demo-site, we are cranking these 100HP+ $10k motorcycles wide-open on the highway, and then tearing down back-roads. For free. Well for the Honda show I had to pay $60 for WingDing33. But the Yamaha demos are absolutely free. So anyway I found out: a) two 15 minute rides isn't really enough to judge whether you can survive the aggressive riding position of the R1 b) the mode switch really makes a difference in the throttle-response but even on the "A" (expert) and "B" (noob) settings it still doesn't pull below 3k rpm. Better than 5k rpm on the C setting...but still nowhere near the 1500rpm minimum for the FZ8 (fast) and FZ1 (silly-grin fast). C) sorry, but the "naked" thing is DOA in my book. Or the "streetfighter" look, whatever you want to call it. Without any sort of fairing all that happens is that the bike doesn't protect your chest and at highway speeds you're just a big parachute hanging off the handlebars. In contrast the relatively-little fairing on the R1 was quite useful, even the half-fairing on the FZ1 which was basically a rectangular fairing like the R1 plus the upper side-panels that come down from the headlight to the cylinder-head. These of course are not real "fairings" in the eyes of GoldWing riders, and they are smaller than the stock FJ1200 fairing. I have the big ZeroGravity replacement FJ1200 fairing that I've cut down a few inches because it ended inches from my face and just trapped too much engine heat under the fairing when I rode around town and it made me dizzy. But it's great on the highway. I'd love to get rid of the mirrors but I will probably settle for the more aerodynamic ones they have now. Assuming that makes any difference whatsoever. Having no fairing at all at 80MPH was quite a revelation (and I'm dismissing the little headlight-brackets). The FZ8 I test-rode was naked, the FZ1 had a half-fairing. Just a little sumthin' to keep you on the bike. And it made all the difference in the world at high speeds. The FZ6 they had there had a full-fairing, the windscreen plus the side-panels that came down to the crankcase-cover. Though of course it wasn't a functional ElectraGlide/GoldWing "full fairing", not even a MotoGP "full fairing", just a cosmetic sport full-fairing...but still more effective and roadworthy than no fairing at all. D) the front-wheel of the FZ1 is still a bit twitchy even in the dry, I suppose that neither it nor the FZ8 have the damper that comes standard on the R6 and R1, the handlebars are wider than the R1 clipons, certainly the springs are weaker and the preload less and the shocks not as good so the suspension and steering bounced around a lot when the R1 at least was stable. It made me want to ride the R6 one more time...I just suspect that the more weight you put on the handlebars the more that any bouncing or wind-shock or throttle-adjustment will upset the handling of the bike...I just couldn't believe that the only bike I tested that was really stable at speed was the R1...but I just ran out of time. I got up to Gettysburg too late and right when I got there they took a half-hour break for lunch. And basically it's just a dumb idea to run a demo from 9 to 3:30. I should mention that the guys at Gettysburg were bitching because no one was coming to take rides while just beyond that building in the back there there was a MASSIVE party at an HD dealership...and of course the entire town was swamped with bikers. If they were trying to lure HD riders onto Yamahas they just got the fringe-element that was too old to care about riding a riceburner and too old to drink. Because just about everyone else was happy riding their Harleys and drinking and eating with their buds. I saw maybe 5 sportbikes up there over 2 days. So anyway they were going to shut the Gettysburg demo down at 3:30 at the latest, due to the lack of r
Honda CRF230L, 2009.
Honda CRF230L, 2009.
This may very well be the last shot that I ever post here again. Why, you ask? Because Wendy may kill me - LOL! (just joking!) She went up to see her family for a few days, and in her absence, I went out and got me a new toy to mess with to give the Harley a rest. (Can't take the Harley off-road anyway...and I still trip out when it even gets a slight coat of dust on it!) So now - I get to 'relive the heydays of yesteryear' of my old motocross days - ie - trailriding, doing some hillclimbing, getting airborne (just a bit!), spinning donuts in the mud - all that good fun stuff! - tho this bike isn't anywhere as powerful as the old YZ's and RM's that I used to race. (Man - I miss the sound of those two-cycle engines revving up like a blender plugged into a 220 outlet, not to mention the sweet aroma of that BelRay 2-cycle oil we mixed up the pre-mix with - LOL! Everything is all 4-cycle engines nowadays.....) This dealership in Nashville, IL that carries all kinds of different brands of cars, trucks, ATV's, and bikes - called 'Holzhauers' - they were advertising this thing on E-Bay when I came across it, of all places. I'm under the impression that when they have something sitting around in their inventory a bit too long - that's how they 'move it,' they'll auction it off on E-Bay. Sidenote) A local Honda dealer had a 2008 model for $4,495, and this thing here went for about a thousand less on that E-bay auction! And it's a year newer! Couldn't pass that deal up! So, I'm still scratching my head wondering what's 'the catch.' It's almost 'too good' to be true - the price and everything. I strongly dislike visiting dealerships - I'm just so used to having salesmen always pushing the hard-pressure sales tactics as they try to gouge your eyeballs out with crooked deals. But anyway, looking forward to having some fun with this thing on the trails up on Wendy's grandma's farm! They said it's 100% brand new with the full factory warranty, and so far, it seems to run well. Thanks! - Holzhauers, in Nashville, IL - for the awesome 'no-pressure' E-Bay deal!

spinning bike brands
spinning bike brands
Marcy Classic Upright Fan Bike
The Marcy® classic upright fan bike offers a traditional, low-tech workout with a unique air-resistance system. The faster you pedal, the greater the resistance, and the fan air flow provides a comfortable cooling effect. Dual-action arms provide a full-body workout. Transport wheels make it easy to move and store.

For a comfortable, cool, and strenuous workout, the Marcy PL105 Upright Fan Bike is a great choice. Why not burn some calories and improve your cardiovascular fitness While listening to your favorite CD or audio book, or starting your day with the morning news? Because Marcy's PL105 unique air resistance system actually increases the air flow and cools you down the harder you pedal, you can indulge yourself with longer, more comfortable workouts. Soon you'll be watching entire movies from the seat of your bike! And with the bike's dual-action arms, no part of your body will be ignored. From your calves up to your pecs, you'll be experiencing a full workout from the convenience and comfort of your home. And to help prevent you from cheating yourself, the bike's easy-to-read computer screen will keep you on task with your exercise vitals, including your total distance, number of calories burned, and speed levels.
Feature Detail:
Dual-action arms provide a full-body workout
User-friendly computer output includes time, distance, calories burned, speed levels, and scan mode
Unique system increases your resistance the faster you pedal
Fan's airflow provides a cooling effect as you exercise
Adjustable seat
Designed to offer a great cardiovascular workout
About Upright Fan Bikes
Despite the competition from trendy new fitness inventions, exercise bikes continue to be popular options for home exercise. They offer the same aerobic benefits of riding a bicycle, but with the "any time, in any weather, from the comfort and safety of home" added convenience. Exercise bikes don't take up much space, require little or no balance or coordination, and can provide an effective work-out for all levels of users, from beginners to serious competitors. While the same could be said for a number of other types of home fitness equipment, the exercise bike is one of the few that allows you to watch television or read while you work out. With uniquely designed air-resistance systems that actually increase air flow towards the body, fan bikes make an exceptional improvement on the classic stationary bike. As you pedal faster, the cooling air flow increases, making for a more enjoyable and comfortable exercising experience. Plus, fan bikes are designed to mimic the posture and feel associated with road cycles. Exercising in this position helps users train muscles as if they were cycling in the outdoors. For many people, having convenient access to quality exercise equipment is critical to sticking with a long-term exercise program, and fan bikes can be the perfect tool.
What's in the Box?
Marcy PL105 Upright Fan Bike, owner's manual, warranty
Manufacturer Warranty
2-year limited warranty on parts

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