Bunnies‎ > ‎

adopting a rabbit


Most rabbits live 9-10 years or more if they have a healthy happy environment. I strongly recommend if you have a rabbit to make it a house rabbit, where it is safest, happiest and will receive adequate attention from you.
BEFORE YOU GET A RABBIT
If you are going to get some bunnies, I recommend going to a shelter and no where else. Shelter bunnies are "handlable" as well as healthy, in fact healthier than breeder rabbits - they have had their vaccinations and have very regular vet care, unlike breeders (which breeders are vets? Om...none). Also just because you buy babies does not mean they will remain sweet and gentle as adults. Many rabbits instinctively DO NOT like to be held. Each has their own personality. I have plenty of rescued bunnies who have been severely neglected and abused, one left on his own in a garden for over 4 years with no companionship, one was even beaten, who are happy to receive rubs and kisses. I have some who do not mind being held but most of them do. I respect that.

Are you aware of how much money will go into spaying/neuter (which even if you get 2 sisters you will need to do or they will fight once they reach sexual maturity at around 4 or 5 months) if you buy babies? First year rabbit vet bills for healthy rabbit = over £100 each rabbit. A shelter bunny will be neutered and have vaccinations up to date. They will also be handled and any who are not able to bond with humans they will let people know. Every year over 60,000 rabbits in the UK are dumped at shelters - most of them originally came from a breeder - breeders sell to pet shops and garden centres.


HAVING SOME COMMON SENSE ABOUT RABBITS
RULE #1 Rabbits are NOT good pets for young children. They do not like loud noises, someone running at them, and can bite in a second if they feel afraid. It is very often I am told that the children "grow bored with" the rabbit. (no doubt that rabbit lives in a hutch so the rabbit has no way to show how energetic, entertaining, and friendly it can be in reality). I have rescued many rabbits that were abused by children including one who had his eye poked in. If you want a pet for your young child, get a goldfish. If you want one for the child to pick up and hold, get it a stuffy. The child can't hurt the stuffy and the stuffy can't hurt the child. 
RULE #2 Rabbits do NOT want to live shut in a small hutch or small house cage. The most important thing you can do before you consider getting rabbits is educate yourself as to their needs and in the modern sense, not with their living in a hutch. This is not to say I think you will put them in a hutch, but it is the way they have lived for years and the way many still live sadly, today. Also just like any other pet, house rabbits can be destructive and messy and should not be shut in a small cage all day while someone is at work. I have friends who house cage their rabbits - but the house cages are huge and take up like half a room (we do not house cage unless they have just had surgery or are sick).  Garden rabbits need security from predators. All rabbits need a lot of attention and space to run. 
RULE #3 Rabbits chew. Rabbits have to chew to wear their teeth down because their teeth are constantly growing. This means they chew furniture, shoes, clothes, electric wires, all sorts. The room/rooms they live in need to be rabbit-safe with barriers against electric wires and people should not get upset if they chew the coffee table. Put your things away up high where they can not reach. If you are a tidy freak, DO NOT GET ANY PETS!
RULE #4: Rabbits need a healthy diet and NOT MUESLI MIX. Please see my diet guide link!

a responsible rabbit owner's costs:

about the same as a dog:

SPAY £70 TO £80
NEUTER £50 AND UP
VACCINATIONS, MYXI AND VHD £40 A YEAR EACH RABBIT
OUTDOOR RABBIT RUN £100 AND UP
OUTDOOR RABBIT HOUSE (A DECENT ONE NOT A PIECE OF CRAP) £75 AND UP

INDOOR RABBIT PROOFING MATERIALS £25 AND UP
INDOOR RABBIT PLAY HOUSES £25 AND UP
FOOD, FOR HEALTHY FOOD MADE BY BURGESS OR SELECTIVE, £5 WEEK PER RABBIT; HAY, £3 TO £4 PER BAG FOR DECENT HAY OR £6 PER BALE, AND EACH RABBIT SHOULD HAVE AT LEAST A BAG OF HAY A WEEK AVAILABLE TO EAT PLUS LITTER HAY; FRESH VEGGIES
TOYS, FOOD BOWLS, WATER BOTTLES, LITTER BOXES, ETC 


 
    

A HUTCH IS NOT ENOUGH!






Subpages (1): two bonded lop brothers
Comments