EZW RT10 WIRELESS TRANSCEIVER. WIRELESS TRANSCEIVER

EZW RT10 WIRELESS TRANSCEIVER. WIRELESS KEYBOARD MOUSE COMBO. PS3 GUITAR HERO CONTROLLER WIRELESS

Ezw Rt10 Wireless Transceiver


ezw rt10 wireless transceiver
    transceiver
  • Transceiver is the fourth album by the Des Moines, IA band The Nadas. The song "Walk Away" was used during the closing credits of the television show Pinks during seasons 1-3.
  • (Transmitter/Receiver) - A Device that receives and sends signals over a medium. In networks, it is generally used to allow for the connection between two different types of cable connectors, such as AUI and RJ-45.
  • A transceiver is a device that has both a transmitter and a receiver which are combined and share common circuitry or a single housing. If no circuitry is common between transmit and receive functions, the device is a transmitter-receiver. The term originated in the early 1920s.
  • A device that can both transmit and receive communications, in particular a combined radio transmitter and receiver
    wireless
  • having no wires; "a wireless security system"
  • Lacking or not requiring wires
  • radio: medium for communication
  • transmission by radio waves
    ezw
  • EZW (Embedded Zerotrees of Wavelet Transforms) is a lossy image compression algorithm. At low bit rates (i.e. high compression ratios) most of the coefficients produced by a subband transform (such as the wavelet transform) will be zero, or very close to zero.

The ATS4 Transceiver Prototype
The ATS4 Transceiver Prototype
Part of my radio hobby is building kits--and sometimes stuff on my own from parts I acquire. Mostly kits, though--with instructions. This thing is a morse code transceiver that can be taken hiking or wherever, and fits in a small Altoids tin. There's a YahooGroup of all the builders and fans of this radio. Things had quieted down on the ATS3 Yahoo Group, as most of the global clique had built their transceivers and were settled in to making slight mods and ironing out malfunctions. When all of a sudden... the designer, an ultralight through-hiker on the Appalachian Trail posted photos and the following note about the next generation of this rig. I was a teacher at Chiba Girls' High School (2007) when I heard about the ATS3B--the fifth generation of this mint-tin radio to be kitted and released by KD1JV, Steven Weber of New Hampshire. I had built a few other kits in our little Japanese apartment, but this one was a totally new experience. I sent for it! The parts are miniscule! Although they are by far not the smallest of the surface-mount components (little candybar shaped resistors, transistors, integrated circuits, etc.), they were still smaller than a grain of rice. The other builders are also mostly of the highest caliber--professional and shade-tree electronics engineers. I'm in way over my head, but it's really a gas to hear these guys tinker with ideas for new designs and the current design. Anyway, here's Steve's note: The next batch of ATS-3B's (due late October / early November) will be the last of thier kind. Panasonic has obsoleted the little audio AGC amp. While I could have bought a "life time" supply while they still had some, I decided to buy just enough for the next batch of ATS-3B rigs and some spares, just in case. In a way, that was a good thing, as it give me incentive to start work on the next generation of ATS rigs, the ATS-4. I have been making progress towards that goal in the last few weeks, though it still has a long way to go. There will be some significant changes from the previous ATS series rigs. o The rig now uses a 132 x 32 pixel LCD graphics display, which can give a 4 line x 20 character display. This thing is pretty amazing. It is super thin, 2 mm, and draws just 150 uA! The down side is that it is a somewhat expensive part and it eats up program memory space, since I have to program look up tables for all the character pixels and tell the display where they go. I think I use up well over 1000 bytes doing that. With the use of the graphics display, the full frequency is displayed, along with messages from the Menu selections and the current battery voltage. I also hope to have a "S" meter bar graph, which will display audio amplitude of the signal. When entering in messages to the keyer memory, the Morse characters are decoded and displayed on the top line as you key them in. o Electronic ON/OFF switch. No more pulling the power plug to turn the rig off. This also allows for an automatic shut down after a set time (which might be programmable) if there is no activity to keep from accidentaly running down the batteries. Also, a low battery voltage shut down might be implemented, haven't decided on this yet. o Three band operation, using slide switches to select bands (like the PFR-3) instead of plug in band modules. I had to reduce the number of bands to three, as only 2P3T slide switches are commonly available. I also had to go back to a single tuned Rx input tank, which is retuned by selecting trimmer caps across the coil. A 2-1 frequency span is about all thats practical with this set up, so I figure the bands covered will be 40/30/20. These are still the three most popular bands. o Since we can't use the audio AGC chip anymore, the rig now has a volume control. o I added a LED to indicate power output from the transmitter. The idea is to have its brightness relate to power output, but I might take this out. Not sure how well it will work or if its worth having. o The addition of the LCD display, band select switches and volume control make the board somewhat larger, so it will no longer fit into an Altoids tin. So, I will have a custom aluminum box made for the rig, which will be about the same size as used for the qrpkits DCxxB rigs. (3.9" x 2.85" x 1") One reason for the change to switch selected bands is the use of the custom box. Designing a box which could be easially opened to change band modules and be made for a reasonable price is just too much of a challange! It will still be quite some time before I can start kitting and selling this rig, so don't hold your breath waiting for it! I uploaded a picture of the first prototype board to the group photo section. 72, Steve KD1JV
Yaesu FT-102 Transceiver
Yaesu FT-102 Transceiver
??????????! FT-101???????????????????????? powerful 6146x3 tubes transceiver! my new main transceiver in the future in place of FT-101

ezw rt10 wireless transceiver
See also:
prepaid wireless broadband for laptops
wireless remote for xbox 360
sixaxis wireless controller ps3
wireless audio sender receiver
print server wireless g
bridge two wireless networks
wireless router for desktop
usb wireless broadband modem
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