BEST ROAD BIKE FOR 500 : BIKE FOR 500

BEST ROAD BIKE FOR 500 : BICYCLE PEDALS WITH TOE CLIPS.

Best Road Bike For 500


best road bike for 500
    road bike
  • A bike with narrow tires best suited for paved roads. Usually noted by drop style bars.
  • A motorcycle that meets the legal requirements for use on ordinary roads
  • A road bicycle is similar to a racing bicycle. However, road bikes are built more for endurance and less for fast bursts of speed, which is desired in a racing bicycle. They usually have more gear combinations and fewer hi-tech racing features.
  • (Road biking) Road cycling is the most widespread form of cycling. It takes place primarily on paved surfaces. It includes recreational, racing, and utility cycling.
  • A bicycle that is suitable for use on ordinary roads, as opposed to a mountain bike
    500
  • five hundred: the cardinal number that is the product of one hundred and five
  • five hundred: denoting a quantity consisting of 500 items or units
  • The .500 S&W Magnum is a fifty caliber semi-rimmed handgun cartridge that was developed by Cor-Bon in partnership with the Smith & Wesson "X-Gun" engineering team for use in their X Frame Model 500 revolvers and introduced in February 2003 at the SHOT trade show.
best road bike for 500 - Western Digital
Western Digital Scorpio Blue 500 GB Bulk/OEM Hard Drive 2.5 Inch, 8 MB Cache, 5400 RPM SATA II WD5000BEVT
Western Digital Scorpio Blue 500 GB Bulk/OEM Hard Drive 2.5 Inch, 8 MB Cache, 5400 RPM SATA II WD5000BEVT
WD Scorpio Blue 5400 RPM 2.5-inch SATA hard drives from Western Digital deliver lightning-fast and ultra-quiet performance hand-in-hand with low power consumption. In addition, they are designed with ruggedness, reliability, and data-protection features that actively watch over valuable data. Available in capacities from 160 to 640 GB, these drives feature a 3 Gb/s SATA interface and 8 MB cache. WD Scorpio Blue hard drives are designed for portable digital devices of all kinds, including notebook computers, external storage, and digital media players.

80% (15)
1955 Bristol Bulldogs Speedway Team
1955 Bristol Bulldogs Speedway Team
2010 - The sound of speedway motorbikes could fill the air at Avonmouth in March next year with the return of the Bristol Bulldogs. Yesterday fans trying to resurrect the club unveiled the site where they want to build a new stadium – a council-owned patch of land opposite the Sevalco smelting company on Chittening Road, which has not been used for at least 35 years. They say there are hundreds of speedway fans in the city who have been starved of the sport and are hungry for its return. It would be a long road back for the Bulldogs, who last raced at Bristol Rovers' Eastville stadium in 1978. But the club's supporters have already submitted a pre-planning application to the council outlining their goals, and are ready to submit full plans in the summer. If they are successful then the Bulldogs could be racing in the National league for the 2011 season, with riders racing around a shale track in front of up to 1,500 spectators on a Saturday night, their engines roaring at almost 100 decibels. Andy Hewlett, a 47-year-old surveyor from Filton, is behind the resurrection of the Bulldogs. A fan from the Eastville days, when he first discovered the sport with his friends at the age of 14, Mr Hewlett has been involved with speedway ever since. He helped revitalise the sport after similar lengthy periods of hibernation in both the Isle of Wight and Somerset, and spent four years as chairman of the Somerset Rebels from 2000. Now, after about 15 years of planning, he is ready to bring the sport back to his home city. He said: "If we get planning permission and a lease from the council we'll build a new track. "It would be about 330m, and when we start we'll be in the national league. That is the third tier of the league system, but we want to start small. "There won't be a huge grandstand, but a block of temporary seats down one of the straights and standing room on the curves and the opposite side for spectators." But there are bigger dreams for what could be the Bulldogs' new home. It would also have a separate BMX facility and track, and there are also plans to incorporate a "wheels project" – an initiative run with the police and the Safer Bristol Partnership to help discourage anti-social behaviour in youngsters. Mr Hewlett said: "It would give supervised access to the track to those who are interested in learning about motorcycles and how they work. "They would be able to race their bikes around the track and strip a bike down, so it would channel their interests into something positive." As well as the single stand there would be catering for fans, garages and pits for the riders and their teams, changing facilities and parking. For race meets on a Saturday night the organiser would also hope to make use of the park and ride in Shirehampton. G areth Rogers is a speedway promoter and supporter who with Mr Hewlett has been instrumental in the success of the sport over recent years. He said: "Speedway is very much a family sport, and we want to attract as many people as possible. The average gate is about 1,500 people, comparable to a non-league football match, and that is what we would be hoping for. "But in years to come we would like to expand that, with the possibility of building a full grandstand." Mr Rogers organised a reunion night in Filton two years ago to mark 30 years since speedway left Bristol, an event attended by Phil Crump, the Bulldogs' captain in the 1977/78 seasons. During that heyday the riders regularly attracted 8,000 or 9,000 fans to the track – more than an average gate at Bristol Rovers – and on the first day of the 1977 season legend has it that 14,000 spectators turned up to watch the Bulldogs. Now the young fans of those times have finally found what could be a suitable site to resurrect the team they love after searching for so long. Mr Hewlett said: "I have been looking around Bristol for about 15 years, probably longer. There are possibly one or two other locations in the city, but it would be much harder to utilise those. "This is the only one that ticks all the boxes. The big advantage here is that there are no houses to disturb. We think the nearest house is about two miles away on the other side of the M49. "The second plus is that the land itself is owned by the city council and it is land designated for sport. We are not asking the council for any money. All we want is planning permission and a lease to use it. "We have private investors who would back the project, which would cost about ?500,000 for the track and all the infrastructure." The pre-planning application will involve a feasibility study and checks over wildlife concerns, and planning permission would have to be submitted by May or June to give the team time to carry out the work before the end of March next year – the start of the 2011 season. A new home for the Bulldogs is being supported by Steve Co
Sky at sunset, Rte. 97 just south of US70
Sky at sunset, Rte. 97 just south of US70
[G9 ISO80 1/50s F4.0 60mm effective dcrawH0W AHD3 > Gimp USM, crop & moderate contrast-boost] I stopped at the first gas-station that I saw after passing I70 heading south on Rt97. Actually that was a nice ride back, found an "off the map" railroad town on 514?S (214W of I83 to 514?S and there it is) , heading southwest out of York... Glen Rock, in between William H. Kain park and Codorus State Park, that is now undergoing some sort of renaissance. Down Rte. 30 and then down Rt. 650. Not a bad part of town. I was going to pass through Westminster and hit 97S but it turned out to be on the northeast part of town. Paper state maps have only so much detail. Not bad roads to carve-up, either :) I didn't even have to deal with a lot of bugs, it was a little cold and not much pasture along the way. Great ride home. So anyway I shot this as a "marker" just to see how the G9 handles the blues and reds. Facing the other way the clouds were nicely lit-up but a little too high in DR and there were a few too many poles and wires to deal with. And 5 minutes later the light was gone. This is about the right exposure, I didn't even have to push it. Added some contrast...again, decent low midtones and shadows, still a little chalky in the highlights. But "technically" that's what I saw. Actually I'm surprised that this came out this well. Maybe it's luminance-noise? I don't know. Just not quite "wet". It's the question of the hour: how to get from the secondary colors to white? Something in that process is not happening right. Oh, God: if I have to buy another fullframe to get past this, I'll scream...I was planning to buy a D90 but I might just go ahead and get another A200 and Tamron 18-250. Either way I'm looking forward to shooting the same scene with it and the G9 and comparing the results from the two cameras. Fullframe-wise there are only 4 real choices: 5D, 5DMk2, D700 and A850. The thing is that I don't really want to buy another 5D [I shot the one I had to death, there's nothing new in it for me even if I know it's a clean camera, and I wasn't all that happy with the results] and it'll cost me about $3K to get into one of the other three and get a 28-300 to go with it. On the other hand I can get a D90 and a 18-55 lens for about $700 or an A200 and 18-70 for about $300. I really want to get both of them, the A200 because it's small, light, fast and good for shots ISO100-800 and the D90 just as an experiment, though I might try a D80 instead because it's CCD and I don't need to shoot video. In any case with either one I can slap a Tamron superzoom on them that I can also shoot on a D700 or A850 sometime later when they show up on eBay for under $1k. It'll mean cropping the shots but at least they will work. With a Canon I would have to stick to EF lenses if I wanted to shoot them on say a 500D or 50D and a 5D or 5DMk2. If I had any real desire to buy another Canon DSLR. Even with a dinky 18-55 VR I can put that on a D700 and get 5MP shots at 28-75 effective. I would buy the subframe cheap, get a cheap starter lens, then get the appropriate 28-300, then get the fullframe later. I've been through the fullframe phase. I'm not dropping $2500 on another fullframe just to take ISO1600-6400 shots handheld. I will however be happy to move up to one when they come way down in price, which they really have to before they make sense for the type of shooting that I want to do compared to a D80 that I can get for $500 on eBay. They're just not worth 4x as much for one extra stop of speed. Anyway, side thought: gas can't be that expensive, at $3/gallon. Too many SUVs on the road on Sundays for it to be a valuable commodity. And by the way, we need a new name for SUVs when you have ones like the Acura RDX and the Honda Odyssey, and that goofy square-rectangular one that has to be a Volvo, those can't all be "SUV"s. And where does a true off-road vehicle fit in there? And I saw *many* Hummers on the road today. But as far as the gas goes, I can't complain: I rode 250 miles in 10 hours on $20 worth of gas. And had a blast, really. Now without a doubt, my car is much easier (not to mention "safer") to drive long-distances especially on the highway. But at its best it gets 30mpg. It's a good way to go *to* places. My bike gets the same 30mpg but it's a much-better way to enjoy the ride. Far more tiring, though, not to mention that it's either too hot or too cold, almost never comfortable, and frankly by the time I get home I'm just glad to get home in one piece. But I do eat well when I'm out on the bike, and it's great for blasting around town or on the backroads or cruising at casual speed in moderate traffic on the highway. Just gotta watch out for the deer, the gravel, the oil, the potholes and the numerous dumb-asses on the road. Nothing to it.

best road bike for 500