REFRIGERATION SAFETY. SAFETY

Refrigeration safety. Commercial refrigeration gaskets. Refrigerator ice machines

Refrigeration Safety


refrigeration safety
    refrigeration
  • the process of cooling or freezing (e.g., food) for preservative purposes
  • deliberately lowering the body's temperature for therapeutic purposes; "refrigeration by immersing the patient's body in a cold bath"
  • (refrigerant) any substance used to provide cooling (as in a refrigerator)
    safety
  • Denoting something designed to prevent injury or damage
  • the state of being certain that adverse effects will not be caused by some agent under defined conditions; "insure the safety of the children"; "the reciprocal of safety is risk"
  • a safe place; "He ran to safety"
  • guard: a device designed to prevent injury or accidents
  • A condom
  • The condition of being protected from or unlikely to cause danger, risk, or injury
refrigeration safety - Food Processing
Food Processing Handbook
Food Processing Handbook
Focusing on the technology involved, this handbook describes the principles and the equipment used as well as the changes -- physical, chemical, microbiological and organoleptic -- that occur during food preservation. In so doing, the text covers in detail such techniques as post-harvest handling, thermal processing, evaporation and dehydration, freezing, irradiation, high-pressure processing, emerging technologies, baking, extrusion, frying and packaging. In addition, it addresses current concerns about the safety of processed foods and control of food processes, as well as the impact of processing on the environment and separation and conversion operations widely used in the food industry.
Scientists and engineers involved in food manufacture, research and development in both industry and academia will benefit greatly from the contents, as will students studying food related topics at undergraduate and postgraduate levels.

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Zonolite Masonry Fill Insulation
Zonolite Masonry Fill Insulation
Vintage advertisement for W.R. Grace's Zonolite Vermiculite Masonry Fill Insulation. Ad indicates many attributes of this "incredible stuff", including: - lightweight - free-flowing - water-repellent - vermin-proof - rot-proof - fire-proof - sound-deadening - inorganic - money-saving - increased fire-rating But ad fails to warn about product's possible asbestos-contaminated content and potential for causation of serious lung/respiratory ailments. This type of material application as loose fill is sometimes overlooked during asbestos building inspection surveys, due to inherent concealment within wall cells and cavities of cement masonry unit (CMU) blocks, especially exterior walls. Although precaution should be taken and be prepared for a possible avalanche of vermiculite if making an inspection opening into the base of a wall or other cavity where this loose granular material happens to have been installed, the free-flowing stuff has been known to just pour out in a seemingly continual flow until an entire cavity space empties out (keeping in mind that masonry block cells are typically "connected" from the floor to the top of the wall). Zonolite vermiculite loose fill material can be encountered in virtually countless "older" construction applications, but perhaps more commonly found in: attics, house side-walls, floor joist cavities, commercial building exterior soffits, masonry walls, boiler and oven cavities, column encasements, pipe chases, etc. The seemingly ubiquitous shiny gold-colored flakes and granules of vermiculite can be further identified in numerous other applications too, including but not limited to: concrete aggregate (floors, slabs, walls, foundations, roof decks, "Z'crete" pipe insulation, etc.), plaster aggregate (walls, ceilings, structural steel fireproofing, fire-stop compounds, structural support columns, etc.), spray-applied surfacing (Mono-Kote fireproofing aggregate, decorative ceiling and wall textures ["popcorn"], acoustical surfacings, etc.), insulating cements (cold storage, refrigeration, radiant heat, furnace coatings, boilers, ovens, kilns, tanks, pipes, etc.), and so on...
Zonolite Vermiculite Masonry Fill
Zonolite Vermiculite Masonry Fill
Close-up of a simple, vintage W.R. Grace Zonolite insulation advertisement where the now-proven asbestos-contaminated vermiculite material was used as fill inside concrete block wall cavities. Zonolite was also heavily marketed for use and can be found in many other construction applications as well, such as: concrete aggregate (floors, slabs, foundations, roof decks, "Z'crete" pipe insulation, etc.), plaster aggregate (walls, ceilings, structural steel fireproofing, sturctural columns, etc.), loose fill (attics, house sidewalls, under-floors, commercial building soffits, masonry walls, boiler and oven cavities, column encasements, pipe chases, etc.), spray-applied surfacing (Mono-Kote fireproofing aggregate, decorative ceiling and wall textures "popcorn", acoustical surfacings, etc.), insulating cements (cold storage, refrigeration, radiant heat, furnace coatings, boilers, ovens, kilns, tanks, pipes, etc.), and so on...

refrigeration safety
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