BEST PHOTO STUDIOS IN CHENNAI : BEST PHOTO STUDIOS

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Best Photo Studios In Chennai


best photo studios in chennai
    studios
  • A room where musical or sound recordings can be made
  • studio apartment: an apartment with a living space and a bathroom and a small kitchen
  • (studio) workplace for the teaching or practice of an art; "she ran a dance studio"; "the music department provided studios for their students"; "you don't need a studio to make a passport photograph"
  • A room where an artist, photographer, sculptor, etc., works
  • (studio) workplace consisting of a room or building where movies or television shows or radio programs are produced and recorded
  • A place where performers, esp. dancers, practice and exercise
    chennai
  • A seaport on the eastern coast of India, capital of Tamil Nadu; pop. 4,298,600
  • a city in Tamil Nadu on the Bay of Bengal; formerly Madras
  • Chennai (Tamil: ), formerly known as Madras (Tamil: AKA ), is the capital city of the Indian state of Tamil Nadu. Chennai is the fourth most populous metropolitan area and the fifth most populous city in India.
  • NIFT Campus, Rajiv Gandhi Salai, Taramani, Chennai - 600 113
    photo
  • A photo finish
  • PHOTO was the name of an American photographic magazine geared towards men. It was published monthly by the Official Magazine Corporation beginning in June 1952.
  • A photograph
  • photograph: a representation of a person or scene in the form of a print or transparent slide; recorded by a camera on light-sensitive material
  • Photo is a French magazine about photography, published monthly by Hachette Filipacchi Medias. It is mostly focused on artistic aspects of photography rather than technical aspects. The editorial line is mostly oriented toward fashion and nude photography.
best photo studios in chennai - TEN FUN
TEN FUN THINGS TO DO IN CHENNAI
TEN FUN THINGS TO DO IN CHENNAI
Q: What do you get when you shrink a travel guide to fit better on a smartphone?
A: The Ten Fun Things travel guide!!!
The goal was to shrink a lengthy conventional travel guide down to an information only guide and make it into a super-compact size for three reasons:
1. It would work well on mobile devices.
2. It could be delivered to the customer for much less than the $8 to $12 travel guides.
3. It could be offered as a new kind of travel guide for people who don’t have time to read 80-100 pages on a tiny screen.
This guide has been designed to be more of a quick reference tool for your smartphone rather than a conventional travel guide. It provides contact information for popular local attractions. It also includes a good list of restaurants, nightclubs and a bonus section covering breakfast. Everything you need and nothing you don't, and for much less than the other guides.
Carry it with you and use it to plan your trip -or- during your trip.
Enjoy!

Q: What do you get when you shrink a travel guide to fit better on a smartphone?
A: The Ten Fun Things travel guide!!!
The goal was to shrink a lengthy conventional travel guide down to an information only guide and make it into a super-compact size for three reasons:
1. It would work well on mobile devices.
2. It could be delivered to the customer for much less than the $8 to $12 travel guides.
3. It could be offered as a new kind of travel guide for people who don’t have time to read 80-100 pages on a tiny screen.
This guide has been designed to be more of a quick reference tool for your smartphone rather than a conventional travel guide. It provides contact information for popular local attractions. It also includes a good list of restaurants, nightclubs and a bonus section covering breakfast. Everything you need and nothing you don't, and for much less than the other guides.
Carry it with you and use it to plan your trip -or- during your trip.
Enjoy!

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Amaratunga Arachige Maurice Dias alias Chitrasena
Amaratunga Arachige Maurice Dias alias Chitrasena
Amaratunga Arachige Maurice Dias alias Chitrasena was born on January 26,1921 at Waragoda, Kelaniya in Sri Lanka. His father was late Seebert Dias, well known actor/producer of the 20s and 30s, founder and instructor for the Colombo Dramatic Club, producer of John de Silva plays and a luminary in the theatrical circles of the day. He was a pioneer actor/director of Shakespearean dramas in Sinhala and English. Chitrasena was encouraged by his father from a young age to learn dance and theatre. In India, Tagore had established his Santiniketan. His lectures on his visit to Sri Lanka, in 1934 had inspired a revolutionary change in the outlook of many educated men and women. Tagore had stressed the need for a people to discover its own culture to be able to assimilate fruitfully the best of other cultures. Chitrasena was a schoolboy then. His father Seebert Dias’ house had become a veritable cultural centre, frequented by the literary and artistic intelligentsia of the time. In 1936, Chitrasena made his debut at the Regal Theatre at the age of 15 in the role of Siri Sangabo, the first Sinhala ballet produced and directed by his father. Presented in Kandyan technique, Chitrasena played the lead role, and this made people take notice of the boy’s talents. D.B. Jayalilake, who was Vice Chairman of the Board of Ministers under British council administration, Buddhist scholar, founder and first President of the Colombo Y.M.B.A, freedom fighter, Leader of the State Council and Minister of Home Affairs, was a great source of encouragement to the young dancer. Chitrasena learnt Kandyan dance from Algama Kiriganithaya Gurunnanse, Muddanawe Appuwa Gurunnanse, Bevilgamuwe Lnpaya Gurunnanse. Having mastered the traditional Kandyan dance, his 'Ves Bandeema' ceremony of graduation by placing the 'Ves Thattuwa’ on the initiate's head followed by the 'Kala-eliya’ mangallaya, took place in 1940. In the same year, he proceeded to Travancore to study Kathakali dance at Sri Chitrodaya Natyakalalayam under Sri Gopinath, Court dancer in Travancore. He gave a command performance with Chandralekha (wife of portrait painter J.D.A. Perera) before the Maharaja and Maharani of Travancore at the Kowdiar Palace. He later studied Kathakali at the Kerala Kalamandalam. In 1941, Chitrasena performed at the Regal Theatre - one of the first dance recitals of its kind - before the Governor Sir Andrew Caldecott and Lady Caldecott with Chandralekha and her troupe. Chandralekha was one of the first women to break into the field of the Kandyan dance. Chitrasena founded the Chitrasena Dance Company in 1943. He toured extensively in the provinces. Chitrasena's brother Sarathsena, a versatile drummer, and sister Munirani were associated in the early dance period. Munirani was a soloist in 'Vidura' ballet. Chitrasena established the first school of National dance, the Chitrasena Kalayathanaya, in Colombo at Kollupitiya in 1944. The sprawling building was handed to him by Sir E.P.A. Fernando, a great patron of the arts - to pursue and further his artistic work. Starting as a small nucleus, the dance centre where Chitrasena lived and worked for 40 years was to become a landmark and a renowned cultural centre for dance enthusiasts and connoisseurs of the arts. In 1945, Chitrasena studied at Gurudev Rabindranath Tagore's Shantiniketan in Bengal and had the distinction of dancing the lead role as Ananda in Tagore's dance drama 'Chandalika’ opposite Nandita Kriplani, Tagore's granddaughter. Chitrasena is a contemporary of Uday Shankar. He represented Shantiniketan at the All India Dance Festival in Delhi. He visited numerous dance centres in Lucknow, Lahore, and Uday Shankar's dance centre in Almora, Assam. He performed in a Shantiniketan show in aid of Tagore's Memorial fund at the New Empire theatre in Calcutta. Rabindranath Tagore and the indigenous revival among India’s Bengali elite inspired several Sri Lankan artistes to drop their Portuguese influenced names and adopt oriental names. Amaradeva, Sarachandra and Chitrasena are some of those who did. Early Period - Obstacles The early period was fraught with severe hardship, insecurity and frustration. The urban intelligentsia, nurtured as they were on pseudo- colonial values, frowned on things indigenous, or at best with native curiosity. They were unprepared to accept the idea of the traditional dance in relationship to the theatre. There were indignities and insults. No patronage, a reluctant and disoriented public, little if any media coverage- Leaflets were distributed that the traditional dance was being destroyed, anonymous postcards. Chitrasena was breaking new ground and there were instances of him being actually hooted off the stage. Not belonging to the traditional dancing 'parampara’ it took him years of hard work to be recognized as an artiste in his own right. Even the traditional dancers who were the proud custodians of an ancient heritage going back over 3,0

best photo studios in chennai