CARDBOARD PHOTO PROPS - CARDBOARD PHOTO

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Cardboard Photo Props


cardboard photo props
    cardboard
  • (of a character in a literary work) Lacking depth and realism; artificial
  • a stiff moderately thick paper
  • without substance; "cardboard caricatures of historical figures"
  • (The Cardboards) The Cardboards were one of the first bands in the local independent/experimental/punk/new wave scene in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania,Mervis, Scott. "", Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, 2006-08-17, p. WE13. Retrieved on 2008-10-09. from around 1979 till 1985.
  • Pasteboard or stiff paper
    photo
  • PHOTO was the name of an American photographic magazine geared towards men. It was published monthly by the Official Magazine Corporation beginning in June 1952.
  • A photograph
  • Photo is a French magazine about photography, published monthly by Hachette Filipacchi Medias. It is mostly focused on artistic aspects of photography rather than technical aspects. The editorial line is mostly oriented toward fashion and nude photography.
  • A photo finish
  • photograph: a representation of a person or scene in the form of a print or transparent slide; recorded by a camera on light-sensitive material
    props
  • prop up: support by placing against something solid or rigid; "shore and buttress an old building"
  • Respect or credit due to a person
  • proper respect; "I have to give my props to the governor for the way he handled the problem"
  • (prop) a support placed beneath or against something to keep it from shaking or falling

Chimney sweeps antique cabinet photo
Chimney sweeps antique cabinet photo
Broom brigades were women’s organizations that spread throughout the United States during the 1880s. Mark Twain observed in his 1883 book Life on the Mississippi that “in the West and South they have a new institution—the Broom Brigade. It is composed of young ladies who dress in a uniform costume, and go through the infantry drill, with broom in place of musket.” He described the broom brigade of New Orleans: “I saw them go through their complex manual with grace, spirit, and admirable precision. I saw them do everything which a human being can possibly do with a broom, except sweep.” Union’s Broom Brigade was organized shortly before the town’s 1889 Fourth of July celebration. The Fourth of July was a major holiday in small town America during the post-Civil War period, and towns competed with each other to see who could put on the most extravagant display of patriotism. The July 4, 1889, issue of the Union Eastern Oregon Republican noted that “while the other committees were busily engaged arranging their plans for a successful celebration of the Fourth a number of the ladies conceived the idea of getting up something on their account the management of which should be entirely in their own hands. A meeting was organized, attended by a large number of ladies, married and single and after discussing a number of plans, the organization of a broom brigade was agreed upon.” The paper noted that “the brigade occupied a prominent place in the procession and was the recipient of much applause as it sturdily marched along, armed with their weapons of defense.” Broom brigades embodied somewhat contradictory ideas about women’s roles in American society. On the one hand, broom brigades can be seen as expressions of what historians call the “cult of domesticity,” a nineteenth-century cultural movement that defined white middle-class women as submissive homemakers and caregivers. But in some ways broom brigades also subverted this cultural ideal. Although the toting of brooms certainly suggested domesticity, the military drilling and public displays of martial skills were expressive of the changing role of women in late nineteenth-century America, particularly their increasing participation in public life and in other activities previously deemed exclusively male. These cab photos...were larger and of higher quality than everthing previous to them...(except for daguerreotypes) by now the photographers had honed the craft and were ready to shine... and they did. Elaborate background became commonplace with retouching added often to soften wrinkles and blemishes. A Renaissance of creativity and a good and popular business coincided giving us great images of America at that time. Many of these still abound giving us a look at the world more than 100 years ago. Cabinet Cards were historicaly kept in curio cabinets with the dishes and glassware, hence the name. Sizes of about 4x6 and mounted neatly with studio name on cardboard George Eastmans browine camera and standardized film revolutionized photography making us all photographers (for better or worse) and it has been that way ever since.
Wistful woman from Michigan antique cabinet photo
Wistful woman from Michigan antique cabinet photo
These cab photos...were larger and of higher quality than everthing previous to them...(except for daguerreotypes) by now the photographers had honed the craft and were ready to shine... and they did. Elaborate background became commonplace with retouching added often to soften wrinkles and blemishes. A Renaissance of creativity and a good and popular business coincided giving us great images of America at that time. Many of these still abound giving us a look at the world more than 100 years ago. Cabinet Cards were historicaly kept in curio cabinets with the dishes and glassware, hence the name. Sizes of about 4x6 and mounted neatly with studio name on cardboard George Eastmans browine camera and standardized film revolutionized photography making us all photographers (for better or worse) and it has been that way ever since.

cardboard photo props
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