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Travel Lighted Makeup Mirrors


travel lighted makeup mirrors
    lighted
  • illuminated: provided with artificial light; "illuminated advertising"; "looked up at the lighted windows"; "a brightly lit room"; "a well-lighted stairwell"
  • A receptacle with a face that becomes illuminated when the device is connected to an energized electrical circuit.
  • Provide with light or lighting; illuminate
  • Switch on (an electric light)
  • Become illuminated
  • set afire or burning; "the lighted candles"; "a lighted cigarette"; "a lit firecracker"
    mirrors
  • (mirror) reflect as if in a mirror; "The smallest pond at night mirrors the firmament above"
  • (of a reflective surface) Show a reflection of
  • (mirror) a faithful depiction or reflection; "the best mirror is an old friend"
  • Keep a copy of some or all of the contents of (a network site) at another site, typically in order to improve accessibility
  • Correspond to
  • (mirror) polished surface that forms images by reflecting light
    travel
  • Journeys, esp. long or exotic ones
  • The action of traveling, typically abroad
  • the act of going from one place to another; "he enjoyed selling but he hated the travel"
  • change of location: a movement through space that changes the location of something
  • (of a device) Designed so as to be sufficiently compact for use on a journey
  • change location; move, travel, or proceed, also metaphorically; "How fast does your new car go?"; "We travelled from Rome to Naples by bus"; "The policemen went from door to door looking for the suspect"; "The soldiers moved towards the city in an attempt to take it before night fell"; "news
    makeup
  • The combination of qualities that form a person's temperament
  • cosmetics applied to the face to improve or change your appearance
  • constitution: the way in which someone or something is composed
  • an event that is substituted for a previously cancelled event; "he missed the test and had to take a makeup"; "the two teams played a makeup one week later"
  • Cosmetics such as lipstick or powder applied to the face, used to enhance or alter the appearance
  • The composition or constitution of something
travel lighted makeup mirrors - Zadro LEDT01
Zadro LEDT01 1X/10X LED Lighted Travel Makeup Mirror
Zadro LEDT01 1X/10X LED Lighted Travel Makeup Mirror
Next Generation LED Lighted Travel 1X - 10X Mirror Dual LED Lights allows you to Illuminate One Mirror or Both Mirrors Light enough to Travel with at only 0.6 lb. Lifetime "Eco-Friendly" LED Bulbs Never Need Replacing Fully Height and Angle Adjustable. Unit size 11.5"H x 4.5"L. Folds to 1.5 deep. Mirror size 3 3/4" No power cord needed. Battery Operated using 3 AAA batteries (not included). Battery Life Of Up To One Year with Regular Use*. 10x/1x Magnification. Unit size 11.5"H x 4.5"L. Folds to 1.5 deep. Mirror size 3 3/4" Off White Finish

82% (17)
29 Esfand 1382 - Tehran21
29 Esfand 1382 - Tehran21
Norooz
(Persian New Year)

In harmony with the rebirth of nature, the Iranian New Year Celebration, or NorooZ, always begins on the first day of spring. Norooz ceremonies are symbolic representations of two ancient concepts - the End and the Rebirth; or Good and Evil. A few weeks before the New Year, Iranians clean and rearrange their homes. They make new clothes, bake pastries and germinate seeds as sign of renewal. The ceremonial cloth is set up in each household. Troubadours, referred to as Haji Firuz, disguise themselves with makeup and wear brightly colored outfits of satin. These Haji Firuz, singing and dancing, parade as a carnival through the streets with tambourines, kettle drums, and trumpets to spread good cheer and the news of the coming new year.

Last Wednesday of the year(Chahar Shanbeh Suri) : On the eve of last Wednesday of the year, literally the eve of Red Wednesday or the eve of celebration, bonfires are lit in public places and people leap over the flames, shouting:
Give me your beautiful red color
And take back my sickly pallor!

With the help of fire and light symbols of good, we hope to see our way through this unlucky night - the end of the year- to the arrival of springs longer days. Traditionally, it is believed that the living were visited by the spirits of their ancestors on the last day of the year. Many people specially children, wrap themselves in shrouds symbolically reenacting the visits. By the light of the bonfire, they run through the streets banging on pots and pans with spoons called Gashog-Zani to beat out the last unlucky Wednesday of the year, while they knock on doors to ask for treats. Indeed, Halloween is a Celtic variation of this night.

In order to make wishes come true, it is customary to prepare special foods and distribute them on this night. Noodle Soup a filled Persian delight, and mixture of seven dried nuts and fruits, pistachios, roasted chic peas, almond, hazelnuts, figs, apricots, and raisins.
Fal-Gush

This is another ritual in which someone makes a wish and stands at the corner of an intersection , or on a terrace or behind a wall. That person will know his fortune when he overhears conversation of a passerby.
Haft-Seen

A few days prior to the New Year, a special cover is spread on to the Persian carpet or on a table in every Persian household. This ceremonial table is called cloth of seven dishes, (each one beginning with the Persian letter Sinn). The number seven has been sacred in Iran since the ancient times, and the seven dishes stand for the seven angelic heralds of life-rebirth, health, happiness, prosperity, joy, patience, and beauty.
The symbolic dishes consist of:

1. Sabzeh or sprouts, usually wheat or lentil representing rebirth.
2. Samanu is a pudding in which common wheat sprouts are transformed and given new life as a sweet, creamy pudding and represents the ultimate sophistication of Persian cooking.
3. Seeb means apple and represents health and beauty.
4. Senjed the sweet, dry fruit of the Lotus tree, represents love. It has been said that when lotus tree is in full bloom, its fragrance and its fruit make people fall in love and become oblivious to all else.
5. Seer which is garlic in Persian, represents medicine.
6. Somaq sumac berries, represent the color of sunrise; with the appearance of the sun Good conquers Evil.
7. Serkeh or vinegar, represents age and patience.

To reconfirm all hopes and wishes expressed by the traditional foods, other elements and symbols are also on the sofreh):

* a few coins placed on the sofreh represent prosperity and wealth;
* a basket of painted eggs represents fertility.
* a Seville orange floating in a bowl of water represents the earth floating in space.
* a goldfish in a bowl represents life and the end of astral year-picas.
* a flask of rose water known for its magical cleansing power, is also included on the tablecloth.
* Nearby is a brazier for burning wild rue ,a sacred herb whose smoldering fumes ward off evil spirits.
* A pot of flowering hyacinth or narcissus is also set on the sofreh.
* A mirror which represents the images and reflections of Creation as we celebrate anew the ancient Persian traditions and beliefs that creation took place on the first day of spring.
* On either side of the mirror are two candlesticks holding a flickering candle for each child in the family. The candles represent enlightenment and happiness.
29 Esfand 1382 - Tehran11
29 Esfand 1382 - Tehran11
Norooz (Persian New Year) March 21st In harmony with the rebirth of nature, the Iranian New Year Celebration, or NorooZ, always begins on the first day of spring. Norooz ceremonies are symbolic representations of two ancient concepts - the End and the Rebirth; or Good and Evil. A few weeks before the New Year, Iranians clean and rearrange their homes. They make new clothes, bake pastries and germinate seeds as sign of renewal. The ceremonial cloth is set up in each household. Troubadours, referred to as Haji Firuz, disguise themselves with makeup and wear brightly colored outfits of satin. These Haji Firuz, singing and dancing, parade as a carnival through the streets with tambourines, kettle drums, and trumpets to spread good cheer and the news of the coming new year. Last Wednesday of the year(Chahar Shanbeh Suri) : On the eve of last Wednesday of the year, literally the eve of Red Wednesday or the eve of celebration, bonfires are lit in public places and people leap over the flames, shouting: Give me your beautiful red color And take back my sickly pallor! With the help of fire and light symbols of good, we hope to see our way through this unlucky night - the end of the year- to the arrival of springs longer days. Traditionally, it is believed that the living were visited by the spirits of their ancestors on the last day of the year. Many people specially children, wrap themselves in shrouds symbolically reenacting the visits. By the light of the bonfire, they run through the streets banging on pots and pans with spoons called Gashog-Zani to beat out the last unlucky Wednesday of the year, while they knock on doors to ask for treats. Indeed, Halloween is a Celtic variation of this night. In order to make wishes come true, it is customary to prepare special foods and distribute them on this night. Noodle Soup a filled Persian delight, and mixture of seven dried nuts and fruits, pistachios, roasted chic peas, almond, hazelnuts, figs, apricots, and raisins. Fal-Gush This is another ritual in which someone makes a wish and stands at the corner of an intersection , or on a terrace or behind a wall. That person will know his fortune when he overhears conversation of a passerby. Haft-Seen A few days prior to the New Year, a special cover is spread on to the Persian carpet or on a table in every Persian household. This ceremonial table is called cloth of seven dishes, (each one beginning with the Persian letter Sinn). The number seven has been sacred in Iran since the ancient times, and the seven dishes stand for the seven angelic heralds of life-rebirth, health, happiness, prosperity, joy, patience, and beauty. The symbolic dishes consist of: 1. Sabzeh or sprouts, usually wheat or lentil representing rebirth. 2. Samanu is a pudding in which common wheat sprouts are transformed and given new life as a sweet, creamy pudding and represents the ultimate sophistication of Persian cooking. 3. Seeb means apple and represents health and beauty. 4. Senjed the sweet, dry fruit of the Lotus tree, represents love. It has been said that when lotus tree is in full bloom, its fragrance and its fruit make people fall in love and become oblivious to all else. 5. Seer which is garlic in Persian, represents medicine. 6. Somaq sumac berries, represent the color of sunrise; with the appearance of the sun Good conquers Evil. 7. Serkeh or vinegar, represents age and patience. To reconfirm all hopes and wishes expressed by the traditional foods, other elements and symbols are also on the sofreh): * a few coins placed on the sofreh represent prosperity and wealth; * a basket of painted eggs represents fertility. * a Seville orange floating in a bowl of water represents the earth floating in space. * a goldfish in a bowl represents life and the end of astral year-picas. * a flask of rose water known for its magical cleansing power, is also included on the tablecloth. * Nearby is a brazier for burning wild rue ,a sacred herb whose smoldering fumes ward off evil spirits. * A pot of flowering hyacinth or narcissus is also set on the sofreh. * A mirror which represents the images and reflections of Creation as we celebrate anew the ancient Persian traditions and beliefs that creation took place on the first day of spring. * On either side of the mirror are two candlesticks holding a flickering candle for each child in the family. The candles represent enlightenment and happiness.

travel lighted makeup mirrors
travel lighted makeup mirrors
The Yellow-Lighted Bookshop: A Memoir, a History
"I cannot remember when I read a book with such delight." --Paul Yamazaki, City Lights Bookstore

November, a dark, rainy Tuesday, late afternoon. This is my ideal time to be in a bookstore. The shortened light of the afternoon and the idleness and hush of the hour gather everything close, the shelves and the books and the few other customers who graze head-bent in the narrow aisles. I've come to find a book.

In The Yellow-Lighted Bookshop, Buzbee, a former bookseller and sales representative, celebrates the unique experience of the bookstore--the smell and touch of books, getting lost in the deep canyons of shelves, and the silent community of readers. He shares his passion for books, which began with ordering through The Weekly Reader in grade school. Interwoven throughout is a
fascinating historical account of the bookseller's trade--from the great Alexandria library with an estimated one million papyrus scrolls to Sylvia Beach's famous Paris bookstore, Shakespeare and Company, which led to the extraordinary effort to publish and sell James Joyce's Ulysses during the 1920s.

Rich with anecdotes, The Yellow-Lighted Bookshop is the perfect choice for those who relish the enduring pleasures of spending an afternoon finding just the right book.

"I cannot remember when I read a book with such delight." --Paul Yamazaki, City Lights Bookstore

November, a dark, rainy Tuesday, late afternoon. This is my ideal time to be in a bookstore. The shortened light of the afternoon and the idleness and hush of the hour gather everything close, the shelves and the books and the few other customers who graze head-bent in the narrow aisles. I've come to find a book.

In The Yellow-Lighted Bookshop, Buzbee, a former bookseller and sales representative, celebrates the unique experience of the bookstore--the smell and touch of books, getting lost in the deep canyons of shelves, and the silent community of readers. He shares his passion for books, which began with ordering through The Weekly Reader in grade school. Interwoven throughout is a
fascinating historical account of the bookseller's trade--from the great Alexandria library with an estimated one million papyrus scrolls to Sylvia Beach's famous Paris bookstore, Shakespeare and Company, which led to the extraordinary effort to publish and sell James Joyce's Ulysses during the 1920s.

Rich with anecdotes, The Yellow-Lighted Bookshop is the perfect choice for those who relish the enduring pleasures of spending an afternoon finding just the right book.

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