COOKING WITH WOOD PLANKS. COOKING WITH

COOKING WITH WOOD PLANKS. MEAT COOKING GUIDE. COOKING MAMA 2 ONLINE FOR FREE

Cooking With Wood Planks


cooking with wood planks
    wood planks
  • Come in long lengths with widths of 4 inches (or 10 centimetres) or more.
    cooking
  • (cook) prepare a hot meal; "My husband doesn't cook"
  • The practice or skill of preparing food
  • The process of preparing food by heating it
  • the act of preparing something (as food) by the application of heat; "cooking can be a great art"; "people are needed who have experience in cookery"; "he left the preparation of meals to his wife"
  • (cook) someone who cooks food
  • Food that has been prepared in a particular way
cooking with wood planks - Plank Cooking:
Plank Cooking: The Essence of Natural Wood
Plank Cooking: The Essence of Natural Wood
From elegant restaurants to backyard grills, the ancient method of cooking food on a wooden plank is a cooking style that's rapidly growing in popularity. When it comes to capturing the essence of natural wood and unparalleled texture in meats, vegetables, and other culinary delights nothing compares to plank cooking.
In Plank Cooking: The Essence of Natural Wood, globe-trotting authors, Scott & Tiffany Haugen, share some of the world's most exquisite flavors. Thai red curry prawns, Achiote pork roast, pesto couscous stuffed chicken, and caramelized bananas are just a few of the unique recipes brought to life in this fully illustrated, one-of-a-kind book. In the oven or on a grill, plank cooking is fun and simple. This book outlines how to master the art of plank cooking--from seasoning planks to detailed cooking tips in over 100 easy-to-follow recipes. Though exotic tastes prevail, the ingredients used in this book are easy to find in most grocery stores. So whether you're hosting a large backyard BBQ, or just trying to satisfy the finicky eaters in your family, you will find many great meals in Plank Cooking: The Essence of Natural Wood.

75% (9)
Grand Canyon Boat grca13673-Glen01
Grand Canyon Boat grca13673-Glen01
THE "GLEN". WOODEN RIVER BOAT PROPELLED BY OARS. PAINTED BROWN. CATARACT DESIGN WITH WATER-TIGHT COMPARTMENTS IN BOW AND STERN. BUILT ACCORDING TO PLANS PROVIDED BY JULIUS STONE. WOOD PLANK CONSTRUCTION. THIN CANVAS, STRETCHED OVER DECK. PAINT FLAKING. BACK HATCH LOANED TO WACC FOR CONSERVATION ON 12/10/2003, RETURNED 04/05/2005. IN 1921, THIS BOAT WAS USED ON THE GREEN RIVER FOR USGS SURVEYING EXPLORATIONS. IT WAS THEN USED ON THE 1923 USGS EXPEDITION TO SURVEY THE GRAND CANYON FOR DAM SITES. THE EXPEDITION WAS HEADED BY COLONEL BIRDSEYE AND EUGENE LARUE, AND INCLUDED GEOLOGIST RAYMOND MOORE AND SURVEYORS AND BOATMEN LEWIS FREEMAN, LEIGH LINT, H.E. BLAKE, EMERY KOLB, AND FRANK DODGE. THE OTHER BOATS ON THE TRIP WERE THE "MARBLE", THE "GRAND", THE "BOULDER", AND THE "MOHAVE". THE "GLEN" CARRIED THE COOK OUTFIT AND WAS ROWED BY BLAKE. THE EXPEDITION WAS ON THE RIVER FROM AUGUST 1- OCTOBER 16, 1923, AND PRODUCED THE FIRST TOPOGRAPHIC MAP OF MUCH OF THE CANYON BOTTOM, AND HAD EXAMINED 21 POTENTIAL DAM SITES. THE "GLEN" WAS RECEIVED BY GRCA IN 1939, FROM WASO DIVISION OF RESEARCH AND INFORMATION, WHEN THEY RAN OUT OF ROOM FOR STORING THE BOAT. FOR MANY YEARS AFTER RECEIPT, THE BOAT WAS ON EXHIBIT IN THE OLD NATURALIST WORKSHOP (WHICH LATER BECAME THE WODC BUILDING). SEE IMAGE #1568. IT WAS PROBABLY ON EXHIBIT THERE UNTIL THE PARK ACQUIRED SEVERAL OTHER BOATS AND DEVELOPED THE HISTORIC BOAT EXHIBIT IN THE VISITOR CENTER PATIO IN THE 1960'S. THE BOAT WAS ON EXHIBIT THERE UNTIL JULY 2003. -THE BOAT WAS MOVED 7/2003, WITH ASSISTANCE FROM WACC CONSERVATOR BRYNN BENDER AND MANY MEMBERS OF THE BOATING COMMUNITY, TO THE 'NEW' MUSEUM COLLECTION CONSERVATION LAB FOR CONSERVATION, AS PART OF THE 'SAVE OUR BOATS' HISTORIC BOAT CONSERVATION PROJECT. NPS PHOTO BY M. QUINN
Grave object (dibondo), Kongo peoples, Democratic Republic of the Congo
Grave object (dibondo), Kongo peoples, Democratic Republic of the Congo
Kongo women handbuilt the majority of domestic pottery, but male Kongo potters fashioned pipes and bowls for calabash water pipes and vessels with animal and human figures that they sold to outside markets. On occasion, men were observed creating water and cooking vessels for local use. More significantly, men produced important ritual pottery, including Kongo grave objects, the tall, hollow, open-based cylindrical terracotta forms known as mabondo. Although 17th-century Europeans described terracottas on Kongo graves that may be linked to mabondo, more recent scholarship suggests that the form originated in the 19th century. Wealthy Kongo commissioned mabondo to commemorate the dead. They were often highly decorated with figures or incised and impressed motifs. The diamond motifs with bosses at the corners of this vessel probably represent the journey the Kongo believe humans must take when they die, traveling between the land of the living and the land of the dead. Production ceased in the 1930s. Kongo men and women employed similar methods to create their vessels, but the men had exclusive use of some implements. For example, male potters sometimes handbuilt their vessels on turntables made of wood or clay. The turntable was attached to a wood plank which was fixed to the ground with a long spike or a small piece of wood, a stone or a clay pivot. Assistants turned the devices with their hands or if the edges of the turntable were serrated, the potters manipulated them with their feet. They then fired their vessels in the open.

cooking with wood planks
See also:
japan cooking equipment
measurement conversion for cooking
cooking light quiche
babies cooking games
radio cooking shows
indian cooking masala
cooking game 60
lobster mushroom cooking
cooking knives
woks cooking
Comments