FLOOR HEATING REGISTERS - HEATING REGISTERS

FLOOR HEATING REGISTERS - 2X14 FLOOR REGISTER.

Floor Heating Registers


floor heating registers
    floor heating
  • Underfloor heating and cooling is a form of central heating and cooling which achieves indoor climate control for thermal comfort using conduction, radiation and convection.
    registers
  • (register) (music) the timbre that is characteristic of a certain range and manner of production of the human voice or of different pipe organ stops or of different musical instruments
  • (register) file: record in a public office or in a court of law; "file for divorce"; "file a complaint"
  • A book or record of attendance, for example of students in a class or school or guests in a hotel
  • A particular part of the range of a voice or instrument
  • (register) record in writing; enter into a book of names or events or transactions
  • An official list or record, for example of births, marriages, and deaths, of shipping, or of historic places

Mayo Hotel, Gillette-Tyrrell Building, Downtown Tulsa
Mayo Hotel, Gillette-Tyrrell Building, Downtown Tulsa
Mayo Hotel: This Chicago School (Sullivanesque) style building has eighteen floors. Its massive base of two-story Doric columns and entablature support fourteen floors in a ‘shaft’ of single double-hung windows with the center and corner pairs adorned with false terra cotta balconies. The building’s crown is two levels of stone with arcaded windows separated by false pillars, capped by a dentiled cornice. This building is also significant for its association with the history and growth of the city. Pioneer Tulsa brothers, John D. and Cass A. Mayo, built the hotel in 1925, patterning it after the Plaza in New York City. Their goals were elegance of decor and fine service. Ceiling fans in each room and Tulsa’s first running ice water made the hotel a haven from summer heat. Once the tallest building in Oklahoma, the hotel, which originally had 600 rooms, is an example of early Tulsa’s optimistic attitude concerning its growth potential. The Mayo served as a residence for J. Paul Getty for several years, and the John D. Mayo family lived in the hotel from 1941 until Mayo’s death in 1972. The Mayo and the Mincks-Adams Hotels are the only large hotels that survive from this early period of Tulsa’s growth. The Mayo Hotel was listed in the National Register on June 27, 1980. It was listed under National Register Criterion C, and its NRIS number is 80003303. Gillette-Tyrrell Building: This building is another significant example of Tulsa’s Art Deco Style of architecture. Completed in 1930, this building was originally designed for thirteen floors but only three were completed. Its appearance, both inside and outside, is unique in comparison to the few buildings of this style remaining in Tulsa. In 1930, the building’s architect described it as having several types of architecture faintly suggested in the building and its decoration. "But, as a whole, the type is distinctly Modern," he said. Its style is now recognized as the early phase of Art Deco. The Italian, Spanish, and American Indian derived motifs on the exterior terra cotta work with its vertical emphasis and colorful Zigzag decorations combine with its interior decorations to provide a classic example of most of the basic elements of the Art Deco style. The original, richly decorated lobby remains today. It contains colorful tile wainscoting, ornate plaster coffered ceilings, mosaic tile floors, detailed cast iron railings, and etched glass windows and light fixtures The ornate exterior terra cotta work is in good condition and is virtually unaltered, although the South canopy was demolished in 2000. The Gillette-Tyrell Building was listed in the National Register on January 21, 1982. It was listed under National Register Criterion C, and its NRIS number is 82003703.
Mayo Hotel, Downtown Tulsa
Mayo Hotel, Downtown Tulsa
This Chicago School (Sullivanesque) style building has eighteen floors. Its massive base of two-story Doric columns and entablature support fourteen floors in a ‘shaft’ of single double-hung windows with the center and corner pairs adorned with false terra cotta balconies. The building’s crown is two levels of stone with arcaded windows separated by false pillars, capped by a dentiled cornice. This building is also significant for its association with the history and growth of the city. Pioneer Tulsa brothers, John D. and Cass A. Mayo, built the hotel in 1925, patterning it after the Plaza in New York City. Their goals were elegance of decor and fine service. Ceiling fans in each room and Tulsa’s first running ice water made the hotel a haven from summer heat. Once the tallest building in Oklahoma, the hotel, which originally had 600 rooms, is an example of early Tulsa’s optimistic attitude concerning its growth potential. The Mayo served as a residence for J. Paul Getty for several years, and the John D. Mayo family lived in the hotel from 1941 until Mayo’s death in 1972. The Mayo and the Mincks-Adams Hotels are the only large hotels that survive from this early period of Tulsa’s growth. The Mayo Hotel was listed in the National Register on June 27, 1980. It was listed under National Register Criterion C, and its NRIS number is 80003303.

floor heating registers
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