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Worst Stock To Invest In


worst stock to invest in
    invest
  • make an investment; "Put money into bonds"
  • endow: give qualities or abilities to
  • Devote (one's time, effort, or energy) to a particular undertaking with the expectation of a worthwhile result
  • Buy (something) whose usefulness will repay the cost
  • Expend money with the expectation of achieving a profit or material result by putting it into financial schemes, shares, or property, or by using it to develop a commercial venture
  • furnish with power or authority; of kings or emperors
    worst
  • (superlative of `bad') most wanting in quality or value or condition; "the worst player on the team"; "the worst weather of the year"
  • defeat thoroughly; "He mopped up the floor with his opponents"
  • Of the poorest quality or the lowest standard
  • Least pleasant, desirable, or tolerable
  • Most severe, serious, or dangerous
  • the least favorable outcome; "the worst that could happen"
    stock
  • (of a phrase or expression) So regularly used as to be automatic or hackneyed
  • (of a product or type of product) Usually kept in stock and thus regularly available for sale
  • Denoting a conventional character type or situation that recurs in a particular genre of literature, theater, or film
  • banal: repeated too often; overfamiliar through overuse; "bromidic sermons"; "his remarks were trite and commonplace"; "hackneyed phrases"; "a stock answer"; "repeating threadbare jokes"; "parroting some timeworn axiom"; "the trite metaphor `hard as nails'"
  • have on hand; "Do you carry kerosene heaters?"
  • the capital raised by a corporation through the issue of shares entitling holders to an ownership interest (equity); "he owns a controlling share of the company's stock"
worst stock to invest in - The Billion
The Billion Dollar Mistake: Learning the Art of Investing Through the Missteps of Legendary Investors
The Billion Dollar Mistake: Learning the Art of Investing Through the Missteps of Legendary Investors
Important investment lessons gleaned from the mistakes of accomplished professional investors and billionaire businessmen
The Billion Dollar Mistake is an up-close account of the career-defining mistakes that some of the world's most brilliant billionaire investors have made, and a revealing look at what we can learn from them. Drawing on author Stephen Weiss' twenty-two years experience at some of Wall Street's most prestigious firms, the core of this book is based upon original research and interviews with these legendary investors, who discuss the most significant trade or investment that went against them, the magnitude of the loss, its effect on their businesses-and on their personal lives. To some, these fascinating accounts will read like a novel; to others, it will be a treasured and unique investment guide.
This intriguing book skillfully examines the causal relationship between the quirks of each investor's personality and the mistakes they have committed. Along the way, Weiss provides a series of compelling narrative accounts of the individuals' road to success, the particular mistakes they made, the character flaws that led to them, and the lessons learned. While some investors made errors of judgment, others made errors of perception. The Billion Dollar Mistake

Uncovers important lessons learned from the failures of some of the most enduring and accomplished investors, including Kirk Kerkorian, Bill Ackman, Aubrey McClendon and Leon Cooperman
Discusses how to incorporate these lessons into your investment discipline and avoid the same missteps
Reveals common mistakes made by bigger investors that the average investor can relate-the only difference is in magnitude with more zeros attached to the loss
Includes insights on improving your investment endeavors by refining your approach to today's markets
Learning from the missteps of the best in the investment business can help you succeed. With The Billion Dollar Mistake, you'll discover how.

Important investment lessons gleaned from the mistakes of accomplished professional investors and billionaire businessmen
The Billion Dollar Mistake is an up-close account of the career-defining mistakes that some of the world's most brilliant billionaire investors have made, and a revealing look at what we can learn from them. Drawing on author Stephen Weiss' twenty-two years experience at some of Wall Street's most prestigious firms, the core of this book is based upon original research and interviews with these legendary investors, who discuss the most significant trade or investment that went against them, the magnitude of the loss, its effect on their businesses-and on their personal lives. To some, these fascinating accounts will read like a novel; to others, it will be a treasured and unique investment guide.
This intriguing book skillfully examines the causal relationship between the quirks of each investor's personality and the mistakes they have committed. Along the way, Weiss provides a series of compelling narrative accounts of the individuals' road to success, the particular mistakes they made, the character flaws that led to them, and the lessons learned. While some investors made errors of judgment, others made errors of perception. The Billion Dollar Mistake

Uncovers important lessons learned from the failures of some of the most enduring and accomplished investors, including Kirk Kerkorian, Bill Ackman, Aubrey McClendon and Leon Cooperman
Discusses how to incorporate these lessons into your investment discipline and avoid the same missteps
Reveals common mistakes made by bigger investors that the average investor can relate-the only difference is in magnitude with more zeros attached to the loss
Includes insights on improving your investment endeavors by refining your approach to today's markets
Learning from the missteps of the best in the investment business can help you succeed. With The Billion Dollar Mistake, you'll discover how.
Get to Know the Billionaires
Amazon-exclusive content from the authors of The Billion Dollar Mistake
These are the Billionaires. Follow their paths to incredible wealth, observe their investment missteps as if you are in the room while they are being made and learn how to become a better investor by avoiding these common errors in judgment.
“Better be wise by the misfortune of others than by your own” – Aesop
Bill Ackman
Discipline means discipline- Bill Ackman and his firm, Pershing Square, had a very profitable experience with Barnes & Noble. Ackman believed he could replicate that success with Borders Group, a competing chain of bookstores, but in order to make that investment he had to violate his discipline. The result was far from what he had hoped.
David Bonderman
Always do your due diligence- David Bonderman, a very careful, accomplished investor, had a long personal and professional history with the CEO of Washington Mutual, and saw opportunity in the popular banking institution. With only a week or so in which to perform due diligence, Bonderman and his firm invested $2 billion in the troubled company. Only five months later, the FDIC seized the bank's assets, making it the biggest bank failure ever.
Leon Cooperman
The absence of regulatory safeguards is a sign of danger ahead- Leon Cooperman was the top investment strategist on Wall Street and a senior partner at Goldman Sachs before forming Omega Advisors, a hedge fund. Presented with the opportunity to invest in the privatization of Azerbaijan's state oil company, Cooperman took the chance but would soon regret it, a victim of fraud by a well-paid employee and an unregulated emerging market.
Chris Davis
Don't own what you don't know- In 2005, Chris Davis significantly increased the Davis Financial Fund's investment in AIG, a company the $60 billion Davis portfolio had owned for more than thirty years. Between the initial investment and the time he added to the position, the AIG in which Chris Davis chose to go "all in" had become a fundamentally different entity - much more complex and murky than a traditional insurance company. When AIG stock plummeted, the loss took a significant toll on the fund's total value.
Geoff Grant
Don't be blinded by outsized returns- Geoff Grant's Peloton Partners found extraordinary success - rising 87 percent in 2007 - with the trading of asset-backed securities (ABS). But with the onset of the global credit crunch, other ABS investors ran for the exits while Peloton stayed put - ultimately wiping out the firm and $2 billion. Weiss counsels caution in chasing hyper-returns, particularly when your style has to drift to get there.
Kirk Kerkorian
Passion is not an investment strategy- Kirk Kerkorian's passion for the American auto industry drove four attempts, three realized, to buy into the Big Three automakers. That passion, combined with early investment successes in the industry, ultimately led to a loss of nearly $800 million when Kerkorian took a large position in Ford. In the world of investing, emotion is the antithesis of discipline. Passion cannot override objectivity.
Bernie Madoff's investors
Be skeptical- Investors who lost billions to Bernie Madoff seemed to have found a deal that was too good to be true - consistent returns at a discount (no fees!). But if something appears too good to be true, it probably is. Investing demands a healthy dose of skepticism. Weiss details the lessons to be learned and followed when temptation presents itself.
Nick Maounis
Understand risk- Nick Maounis and his Amaranth hedge fund found phenomenal success in energy trading before losing more than $6 billion in less time than it takes a half-moon to complete its cycle. Although Amaranth had a highly developed risk management function designed to avert such disasters, the reality is that risk management offers no guarantees. If risk can be the downfall of brilliant and experienced traders, where does that leave the individual investor? Weiss provides the answer to this important question and the lessons for navigating individual risk.
Aubrey McClendon
Leverage is a double-edged sword- Aubrey McClendon leveraged himself to the hilt to buy millions of shares of his own company, Chesapeake Energy. It was a strategy that created a $4 billion fortune. But when gas prices slid, margin calls wiped out nearly all his holdings in the company he had started with just $50,000. Buying on margin - that is, with borrowed money - allows investors to increase the size of their investments, but the penalty for being wrong can be severe.
Adolf Merckle
Short selling: Proceed with caution- Adolf Merckle was one of the wealthiest people in Germany when he risked a fortune "shorting" Volkswagen stock. His multi-hundred-million-dollar bet that the stock price would decline proved a risk he couldn't afford to take, particularly with the rest of his business empire crumbling. With more than a little help from Porsche, VW stock skyrocketed and Merckle - after being forced to sell off assets and beg for loans - hurled himself in front of an oncoming train. Short selling requires a very cautious approach including the observance of specific rules that Weiss details in this chapter.
Richard Pzena
Declining stock prices may not equal opportunity- Richard Pzena saw the collapse in residential mortgages and the tanking of financial stocks in late 2007 and early 2008 as a once-in-a-generation opportunity to pay bargain basement prices for Citigroup, Fannie Mae, and Freddie Mac. Less than a year later, and with financial stocks comprising 40 percent of Pzena's portfolio, Fannie and Freddie were nationalized - essentially wiping out their equity value. Stocks are rarely inefficiently priced, Weiss warns, offering insights on finding opportunity in potential calamity - and avoiding the reverse.

83% (9)
69/365 - Whippet socks
69/365 - Whippet socks
Here's some very interesting history on missing socks... History of the Lost Socks - Taken from Lonleysock.com Most people are surprised to learn that the Bureau of Missing Socks began as a company in the Union Army during the Civil War in the States of America. It was formed on August 1st, 1861. The name of the founder was Joseph Smithson and he was a haberdasher by trade but quite a bad soldier. He was therefore put in full and complete charge of socks of the enlisted men and officers. He brought to the army skills of stock keeping, purchasing, accounting, and salesmanship He immediately instituted a cost control structure and created one of the most honest, tightly run purchasing sections serving the Union side during the entire conflict. Major Smithson’s first concern was not buying new socks for the army but maintaining and repairing the ones on the feet of the soldiers. He was the force behind the order that required that each member of the North’s forces turn in a used sock before receiving a new one. The General Order was cancelled a week later by the War Department possibly at the instigation of New England mill owners who feared that their business with the army would be cut in half. To counteract the war profiteers, Major Smithson tried to implement a General Order which required that each soldier turn in a full pair of socks before receiving a new one and document all those missing. That was when he discovered that most of troops only lost one sock at a time. His first brush with the missing sock phenomenon. He was, however, able to institute his doctrine of field repair, creating the first and only sock darning, knitting, and issuing company in the United States Army trained to operate directly behind the front lines. Major Smithson pressed on. When he couldn’t be supplied with darning eggs he found a supplier in England who also provided him with needles. He then rethought the basic concept and created the first Field Sock Darning Kit. He advocated the integration of women into the armed services to darn the socks but that cause was hopeless. "The Darners" unit was overlooked in the general demobilization after the war. The Bureau of Missing Socks was transferred to civilian control where it immediately came under the grip of corrupt officials and businessmen known as the Whisky Ring. They increased the staff to over a thousand and its budget a thousand fold. It became the sole purchasing agent for all the socks worn by the uniformed services. In 1875, its members were sent to jail. One good thing did come out of the corruption surrounding the Grant administration. The United States Government had purchased enough socks in three years to equip all the armies in World War 1 and 2. In fact, each recruit in the Spanish American War was issued twelve pairs. It was during this conflict that the Missing Sock Bureau received its first official investigative assignment. Many of troops were losing their government issued socks. It was soon discovered that the soldiers were trading them in for certain sexual favors. We entered World War I confidant that our troops were this best shod in the world but it was soon discovered that the typical soldier was on the average five inches taller than his counterpart in the Eighteen Seventies and the country’s vast stock pile of socks were too small. More had to be ordered. After World War II, the Bureau had absolutely nothing to do. Most of its employees were dismissed or transferred to more meaningful defense work. But due to some oversight the budget was not curtailed but increased, because our director at that time, Harrison L. Lawson, used the all available funds to hire the best lobbyist in Washington and invested in the careers of promising politicians on the national level. In four short years the future of the Bureau was secured and it began to grow to what it is today. And -- our vast stockpiles of socks were finally put to use as part of the Marshall Plan. No European on this side of the Iron Curtain during that late Nineteen Forties and early Fifties had to worry about cold feet in the winter if they were size seven or less. The Bureau came to the forefront again during the Cold War. Stalin did not believe that we were really a civilian agency but a cover for the manufacture of a new and powerful weapon that the Soviet Union could not duplicate. He ordered the KGB to penetrate our facilities at all costs. The Central Intelligence Agency jumped to the gun. The Bureau (still just the Bureau of Socks) budget was again increased, as was its manpower. Our new facilities were constructed in Washington on the shores of the Potomac River. Radio, cable, mail and messenger traffic was increased to exceed that of any other government agency. Suspected moles were encouraged to sign on and cryptologists on our staff devised a new code name Argyle which no one could decipher. It was discovered that at least sixty percent of the Soviet Unio
01 Dec 2009 - Making Better Decisions (Part 1)?
01 Dec 2009 - Making Better Decisions (Part 1)?
Some of us would be quite happy if we never had to make another decision. This is because decision-making can be very stressful. Choosing which tie to wear is simple enough, but what about whether to leave the company, whether to invest your life savings on a particular stock, or whether to marry your partner? The impact of major decisions like those could be life-altering and much of the stress comes from the fear that our choice could be wrong. This fear causes some of us to keep postponing the decision until of course the decision is made for us - either the opportunity passes, things don’t improve or the other party makes the choice. We often think that not making a decision absolves us of the guilt of making a wrong choice, but not making a decision is also a decision. When you don’t make a decision to leave, you’re really in effect choosing to stay. When you don’t consciously try to make things better, you’re really allowing the situation to remain the same or get worse. It takes skill to make the best decision and here are some ways to make the process more informed and less onerous on your conscience. First of all, stop thinking of decisions as being “right” or “wrong”. There is simply no such thing. All you can do is to make the most informed decision given the information available to you at the time. In this sense, a decision can be good or bad depending on how much consideration you gave to it, but the result cannot be judged as “right” or “wrong” - your life is a work in progress and any decision is simply part of the process. A seemingly wrong decision may yet have positive outcomes later on. For example, if you choose to marry him even though he finds kicking cats funny, and he turns out to be a wife-abuser, you obviously made a bad decision based on the information that was available to you, but the experience would have equipped you with essential life skills that would benefit you in future. Often, we think that there are only two options, but really there’s never just one way to do something. So when faced with a major decision, try analyzing it holistically, examine all angles. For example, when deciding whether or not to leave the company, examine other options like, instead of leaving, could you perhaps satisfy your passion or supplement your income by taking up freelance work outside of your job? Could your company work out a part-time contract for you? Don’t just settle for what’s available. Very often, the best decision is the one you create for yourself.

worst stock to invest in
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