EDUCATION IS INVESTMENT. IS INVESTMENT

Education is investment. Starts investing globally. Investment managment software.

Education Is Investment


education is investment
    investment
  • the commitment of something other than money (time, energy, or effort) to a project with the expectation of some worthwhile result; "this job calls for the investment of some hard thinking"; "he made an emotional investment in the work"
  • outer layer or covering of an organ or part or organism
  • An act of devoting time, effort, or energy to a particular undertaking with the expectation of a worthwhile result
  • The action or process of investing money for profit or material result
  • A thing that is worth buying because it may be profitable or useful in the future
  • investing: the act of investing; laying out money or capital in an enterprise with the expectation of profit
    education
  • The theory and practice of teaching
  • the activities of educating or instructing; activities that impart knowledge or skill; "he received no formal education"; "our instruction was carefully programmed"; "good classroom teaching is seldom rewarded"
  • the gradual process of acquiring knowledge; "education is a preparation for life"; "a girl's education was less important than a boy's"
  • A body of knowledge acquired while being educated
  • The process of receiving or giving systematic instruction, esp. at a school or university
  • knowledge acquired by learning and instruction; "it was clear that he had a very broad education"
education is investment - CFA Study
CFA Study Notes - 7. Equity Investments & 8. Fixed Income (CFA Level I Study Notes)
CFA Study Notes - 7. Equity Investments & 8. Fixed Income (CFA Level I Study Notes)
**How to Pass CFA Exams After Studying for Two Weeks without Anxiety
CFA Level I - Cheat Sheet

**CFA Study Notes series**:
CFA Level I Study Notes - 1. Ethical and Professional Standards
CFA Level I Study Notes - 2. Quantitative Methods
CFA Level I Study Notes - 3. Economics
CFA Level I Study Notes - 4. Financial Reporting and Analysis
CFA Level I Study Notes - 5. Corporate Finance
CFA Level I Study Notes - 6. Portfolio Management and Wealth Planning
CFA Level I Study Notes - 7. Equity
CFA Level I Study Notes - 8. Fixed Income
CFA Level I Study Notes - 9. Derivatives
CFA Level I Study Notes - 10. Alternative Investments
**CFA Flashcards series**:
Ethical and Professional Standards
Quantitative Methods
Economics
Financial Reporting and Analysis
Corporate Finance
Portfolio Management and Wealth Planning
Equity
Fixed Income
Derivatives
Alternative Investments

**CFA Level I Practice Exam with Detailed Explanation series**:
Portfolio Management, Derivatives, Fixed Income, Equity & Alternative Investment,
Corporate Finance
Economics
Quantitative Methods
Ethical and Professional Standards
Financial Reporting & Analysis
Sample Exam

**How to Pass CFA Exams After Studying for Two Weeks without Anxiety
CFA Level I - Cheat Sheet

**CFA Study Notes series**:
CFA Level I Study Notes - 1. Ethical and Professional Standards
CFA Level I Study Notes - 2. Quantitative Methods
CFA Level I Study Notes - 3. Economics
CFA Level I Study Notes - 4. Financial Reporting and Analysis
CFA Level I Study Notes - 5. Corporate Finance
CFA Level I Study Notes - 6. Portfolio Management and Wealth Planning
CFA Level I Study Notes - 7. Equity
CFA Level I Study Notes - 8. Fixed Income
CFA Level I Study Notes - 9. Derivatives
CFA Level I Study Notes - 10. Alternative Investments
**CFA Flashcards series**:
Ethical and Professional Standards
Quantitative Methods
Economics
Financial Reporting and Analysis
Corporate Finance
Portfolio Management and Wealth Planning
Equity
Fixed Income
Derivatives
Alternative Investments

**CFA Level I Practice Exam with Detailed Explanation series**:
Portfolio Management, Derivatives, Fixed Income, Equity & Alternative Investment,
Corporate Finance
Economics
Quantitative Methods
Ethical and Professional Standards
Financial Reporting & Analysis
Sample Exam

79% (19)
??????? ?????....
??????? ?????....
The Curious Case of the Pessimistic Public: A great myth of our time and society is that the quality of education in Sri Lanka has fallen. This myth is paraded in the newspapers, on radio and TV, in the speeches of influential individuals and opinion makers, and in popular conversation. The myth, in fact, is not supported by evidence. Every indicator of education access, and nearly all the indicators of education quality, show positive progress over time. Enrolment rates have increased, survival and completion rates in basic and secondary education have risen, learning outcomes are improving, and a higher proportion of students are pursuing senior secondary and higher education. University graduates are more skilled and technically competent than the graduates of earlier generations, and in a wider and expanding range of subjects. Education also continues to generate strong economic and social benefits. Men and women enjoy high returns to their investments in human capital. Education promotes social mobility, both within the work-cycles of individuals, and across and over the generations. Gender empowerment and development are facilitated by education. The health of families and of children are improved by the education attainments of their parents, especially their mothers. Households with educated workers are substantially less likely to be poor than households with uneducated workers. And all these economic and social benefits of education can be demonstrated, and indeed have been demonstrated, through scientific studies. The myth of declining education, it appears, is generated by several factors. First, there are unreasonably romantic views of the scope and potential of education. If only, according to this romantic view, people are properly educated, they would be virtuous and good. A further fallacy contained within this romantic view is a reference to one or two admired individuals of the past, juxtaposed against the behavior of the average, or even less-than-average, person of the present. “ There were moral giants in those days “, says this romantic fallacy, “ and today we have only moral pygmies. “ This romantic position, unfortunately, is simply not true. Education can and does make people more cultured, more competent and more skilled. But education does not, as a whole and on the average, make people more virtuous. Schools and universities cannot play the role of the temple, the kovil, the mosque and the church. And one could plausibly argue that even the temple, the kovil, the mosque, and the church, appear to have a limited impact on the fundamental moral and ethical nature of human beings. The comparison of a few moral giants of the past, with the average or even less-than-average person of the present, is incorrect. In every age and generation there are a few exceptionally great and good men and women. But comparing the peak of past generations with the average of our times is a logical fallacy. Either we need to compare the peak of past generations with the peak of our time, or we need to compare the average of past generations with the average of our time, or we need to compare the less-than-average of past generations with the less-than-average of our time. And on any of these comparisons, there is parity between our time and the past. A second factor that contributes to the idea of a decline in the quality and standards of education is purely the herd instinct. It has become normal, in the newspapers, on radio and TV, in the speeches of influential individuals and opinion makers, and in popular conversation, to state that the quality of education has fallen. It is what everyone seems to be saying, and hence it is what everyone says! But of course, like most ideas generated and propagated through the herd instinct, it is simply not true. A third factor, and the only piece of empirical evidence advanced to support the notion that education quality has declined, is the widespread and growing prevalence of tuition. Ironically, though, tuition is actually the result of an education system which has improved faster than the country’s economy. More and more individuals are being educated. But the higher education and economic opportunities available for these educated individuals are not expanding that rapidly. Hence, an increasing number of individuals are competing for a limited number of opportunities. And tuition becomes an additional resource in the competition for the limited higher education and economic opportunities. A fourth factor which contributes to the idea of a fall in the quality of education is that there has, in fact, been a decline in the relative position of the economy of the country. At the time of Independence, in 1948, Sri Lanka was one of the richest countries in Asia. Many economists at the time thought that Sri Lanka would become an economic success story and, in the due course of time, join the club of the world’s rich nations. Sadly, the country chos
LONDON, 9th December 2010; Students, anti-cuts protesters, Black blocs, trans-European anarchists and more protest against the Government's plans for higher education.
LONDON, 9th December 2010; Students, anti-cuts protesters, Black blocs, trans-European anarchists and more protest against the Government's plans for higher education.
Top Shop, on Oxford Street, was also attacked, its windows smashed and messages stating "We won't pay for their crisis" and "Tax dodgers - pay your tax" left behind, a reference to Top Shop owner and government adviser, Philip Green, who avoided paying over a quarter of a billion pounds in tax through the employment of an offshore investment company, registered in the name of his Monaco-based wife.

education is investment
education is investment
The Education of a Speculator
Acclaim for The Education of a Speculator, a provocative and penetrating look into the mind, the soul, and the strategies of one of the most controversial traders of all time

"A compelling and an entertaining read." -The Wall Street Journal

"Victor Niederhoffer gives us page after page of distilled investment wisdom. Taken together, this is pure nectar to those who aim for consistently superior stock market performance." -Barron's

"The Education of a Speculator offers plenty of insights into the way markets work, but the epiphanies are what a reader might expect from Lao-tzu rather than, say, Graham and Dodd." -Worth magazine

"The Education of a Speculator is the first meaningful book on speculating. Successful speculating is as fine an art as chess, checkers, fishing, poker, tennis, painting, and music. Niederhoffer brings forth the best from each of these fields and shows the investor how their principles can enrich one's life and net worth." -Martin Edelston, President, Boardroom Inc., publishers of Boardroom Classics and Bottom Line/Personal

"With an original mind and an eclectic approach, Victor Niederhoffer takes the reader from Brighton Beach to Wall Street, visiting all stops of interest along the way. What emerges is a book full of insights, useful to the professional and layman alike." -George Soros, Principal Investment Advisor, The Quantum Fund

What you typically hear about Victor Niederhoffer is that he trades for "the great Soros," that he doesn't wear shoes in his office, that the only newspaper he reads is the National Enquirer, and that a picture of the Titanic hangs in his office.
That's all true. But it's the logic behind the eccentricities that is the real story. The Education of a Speculator is a sojourn inside the one-of-a-kind mind of Victor Niederhoffer, a trader in commodities and a keen observer of life. He has trained himself to look at the world in a singular fashion: where the guy on the street sees opportunity, Niederhoffer has scoped out all the downsides and done the contrarian thinking necessary to turn a profit. Niederhoffer draws material from disciplines as varied as biology, music, cards, and sports. His book, written with humor and verve, offers readers a chance to see the world through his lenses. The result is a genuinely new perspective on life (unless you too happened to grow up a speculator). This is a terrific, rewarding book.

Comments