DECORATIVE METAL STRAPS - METAL STRAPS

DECORATIVE METAL STRAPS - MODERN CHRISTMAS TREE DECOR.

Decorative Metal Straps


decorative metal straps
    metal straps
  • (METAL STRAP) Short lengths of metal strap 25x1 (1/16x1) used to fix members together to resist uplift.
    decorative
  • Serving to make something look more attractive; ornamental
  • Relating to decoration
  • cosmetic: serving an esthetic rather than a useful purpose; "cosmetic fenders on cars"; "the buildings were utilitarian rather than decorative"
  • (decoratively) in a decorative manner; "used decoratively at Christmas"
  • (decorativeness) an appearance that serves to decorate and make something more attractive
decorative metal straps - Camera Straps
Camera Straps by Capturing Couture: Romance Bliss 1.5" SLR/DSLR Camera Strap
Camera Straps by Capturing Couture: Romance Bliss 1.5" SLR/DSLR Camera Strap
One of the hottest trends this year is Bohemian inspired, and rooted in artisan flavor. Bohemian Chic dressing is soft and feminine but also so easy to mix into a funkier eclectic style - the freshest way to pull off this look is by mixing old with new. Let Capturing Couture be your guide to achieving effortless style, with a casual mix of hippie, ethnic, gypsy and vintage elements.

Capturing Couture's Romance Bliss SLR/DSLR camera straps feature rich shades of red, pink and gold medallion shapes, set against a black background. It's love at first sight, your next object of desire!

Dimensions - Decorative - 1.5 wide X 30 long nylon webbing Connection - 3/8 wide X 14 long nylon webbing Total Length - 30 fixed length long with 6-8 additional adjustability Care - Spot clean with microfiber cloth and water

80% (14)
1114 Shore Road
1114 Shore Road
Douglaston Historic District, Douglaston, Queens, New York City, New York, United States Date: 1907 Architect: J. Sarsfield Kennedy Style: English bungalow/Arts and Crafts Stories: 2 Structure/material: Frame with brick veneer at first story and shingle siding at second story Notable building features: Intersecting gabled roofs with prominent eave brackets, wood shingles on roof imitating thatch; roof dormers; two brick chimneys, one exposed; Tudor arched window and door openings; double-height ogee-arched window openings with stained glass on east and west sides; decorative metal grille door at main entrance; attached arbor on west facade INTRODUCTION The Douglaston Historic District contains more than 600 houses set along landscaped streets on a mile-long peninsula extending into Little Neck Bay, at the northeastern edge of Queens adjoining Nassau County. Its history over the past four centuries ranges from a native American settlement to an eighteenth-century farm, a nineteenth-century estate called Douglas Manor, and an early twentieth-century planned suburb, also called Douglas Manor. The Douglaston Historic District encompasses the entire Douglas Manor suburban development, plus several contiguous blocks. Most of the houses in the proposed district date from the early- to mid-twentieth century, while a few survive from the nineteenth century, and one from the eighteenth century. The landscape includes many impressive and exotic specimen trees planted on the mid-nineteenth-century estate, as well as a great white oak, located at 233 Arleigh Road, believed to be 600 years old. Douglaston's location on a peninsula jutting into Flushing Bay at the eastern border of Queens County is an important factor in establishing the character of the district. The very early buildings surviving in the district include the c.1735 Van Wyck House, the c. 1819 Van Zandt manor house (expanded in the early twentieth century for use as the Douglaston Club), and the Greek Revival style c. 1848-50 Benjamin Allen House. Much of the landscaping, including the specimen trees, survives from the estate of Douglas Manor, established by George Douglas and maintained by his son William Douglas. Most of the houses in the historic district were built as part of the planned suburb of Douglas Manor, developed by the Rickert-Finlay Company, that was part of the residential redevelopment of the Borough of Queens following its creation and annexation to the City of Greater New York in 1898. A set of covenants devised by the Rickert-Finlay Company helped assure a carefully planned environment, including a shorefront held in common, winding streets following the topography of the peninsula, and single-family houses ranging in size from substantial mansions along Shore Road on the west to more modest cottages closer to Udalls Cove on the east. The houses of the historic district, which are representative of twentieth-century residential architecture, were designed in a variety of styles including the many variants of the Colonial Revival, many houses in the English manner incorporating Tudor Revival, English cottage, and Arts and Crafts motifs, as well as the Mediterranean Revival. In most cases, they were designed by local Queens architects, including over a dozen who lived in Douglaston itself. The district includes three houses of the Craftsman type pioneered by Gustav Stickley. Eight of the houses in the district were designed by Josephine Wright Chapman, one of America's earliest successful women architects, and they constitute an important body of her work. The Douglaston Historic District survives today as an important example of an early twentieth-century planned suburb adapted to the site of a nineteenth-century estate. The stylistically varied suburban residences, the distinctive topography, the landscaped setting, and the winding streets create a distinct sense of place and give the district its special character. HISTORICAL AND ARCHITECTURAL BACKGROUND OF THE DOUGLASTON HISTORIC DISTRICT Native American and Colonial antecedents The Native American presence on the Little Neck peninsula today known as Douglaston included the Matinecoc,1 one of a group on western Long Island linked by culture and language to others in the area surrounding Manhattan Island (including the Nayack, Marechkawieck, Canarsee, Rockaway, and Massapequa). A number of finds from those settlements have been identified at various sites on the peninsula.2 The Matinecoc, who fanned the peninsula and apparently also produced wampum, were summarily evicted in the 1660s by Thomas Hicks, later Judge Hicks, in what has been described as the only such seizure of property recorded in Flushing town records. In the 1930s, according to local histories, a Matinecoc burial ground was destroyed to make way for a widening of Northern Boulevard, and the remains reinterred in the cemetery of Zion Church.3 The property seized by Thomas Hicks in the 1660s
1114 Shore Road
1114 Shore Road
Douglaston Historic District, Douglaston, Queens, New York City, New York, United States Date: 1907 Architect: J. Sarsfield Kennedy Style: English bungalow/Arts and Crafts Stories: 2 Structure/material: Frame with brick veneer at first story and shingle siding at second story Notable building features: Intersecting gabled roofs with prominent eave brackets, wood shingles on roof imitating thatch; roof dormers; two brick chimneys, one exposed; Tudor arched window and door openings; double-height ogee-arched window openings with stained glass on east and west sides; decorative metal grille door at main entrance; attached arbor on west facade INTRODUCTION The Douglaston Historic District contains more than 600 houses set along landscaped streets on a mile-long peninsula extending into Little Neck Bay, at the northeastern edge of Queens adjoining Nassau County. Its history over the past four centuries ranges from a native American settlement to an eighteenth-century farm, a nineteenth-century estate called Douglas Manor, and an early twentieth-century planned suburb, also called Douglas Manor. The Douglaston Historic District encompasses the entire Douglas Manor suburban development, plus several contiguous blocks. Most of the houses in the proposed district date from the early- to mid-twentieth century, while a few survive from the nineteenth century, and one from the eighteenth century. The landscape includes many impressive and exotic specimen trees planted on the mid-nineteenth-century estate, as well as a great white oak, located at 233 Arleigh Road, believed to be 600 years old. Douglaston's location on a peninsula jutting into Flushing Bay at the eastern border of Queens County is an important factor in establishing the character of the district. The very early buildings surviving in the district include the c.1735 Van Wyck House, the c. 1819 Van Zandt manor house (expanded in the early twentieth century for use as the Douglaston Club), and the Greek Revival style c. 1848-50 Benjamin Allen House. Much of the landscaping, including the specimen trees, survives from the estate of Douglas Manor, established by George Douglas and maintained by his son William Douglas. Most of the houses in the historic district were built as part of the planned suburb of Douglas Manor, developed by the Rickert-Finlay Company, that was part of the residential redevelopment of the Borough of Queens following its creation and annexation to the City of Greater New York in 1898. A set of covenants devised by the Rickert-Finlay Company helped assure a carefully planned environment, including a shorefront held in common, winding streets following the topography of the peninsula, and single-family houses ranging in size from substantial mansions along Shore Road on the west to more modest cottages closer to Udalls Cove on the east. The houses of the historic district, which are representative of twentieth-century residential architecture, were designed in a variety of styles including the many variants of the Colonial Revival, many houses in the English manner incorporating Tudor Revival, English cottage, and Arts and Crafts motifs, as well as the Mediterranean Revival. In most cases, they were designed by local Queens architects, including over a dozen who lived in Douglaston itself. The district includes three houses of the Craftsman type pioneered by Gustav Stickley. Eight of the houses in the district were designed by Josephine Wright Chapman, one of America's earliest successful women architects, and they constitute an important body of her work. The Douglaston Historic District survives today as an important example of an early twentieth-century planned suburb adapted to the site of a nineteenth-century estate. The stylistically varied suburban residences, the distinctive topography, the landscaped setting, and the winding streets create a distinct sense of place and give the district its special character. HISTORICAL AND ARCHITECTURAL BACKGROUND OF THE DOUGLASTON HISTORIC DISTRICT Native American and Colonial antecedents The Native American presence on the Little Neck peninsula today known as Douglaston included the Matinecoc,1 one of a group on western Long Island linked by culture and language to others in the area surrounding Manhattan Island (including the Nayack, Marechkawieck, Canarsee, Rockaway, and Massapequa). A number of finds from those settlements have been identified at various sites on the peninsula.2 The Matinecoc, who fanned the peninsula and apparently also produced wampum, were summarily evicted in the 1660s by Thomas Hicks, later Judge Hicks, in what has been described as the only such seizure of property recorded in Flushing town records. In the 1930s, according to local histories, a Matinecoc burial ground was destroyed to make way for a widening of Northern Boulevard, and the remains reinterred in the cemetery of Zion Church.3 The property seized by Thomas Hicks in the 1660s p

decorative metal straps
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