MUSIC INSTRUMENTS CANADA - INSTRUMENTS CANADA

MUSIC INSTRUMENTS CANADA - ANTIGUA WINDS SAXOPHONES.

Music Instruments Canada


music instruments canada
    music instruments
  • (Music Instrument) A musical instrument is constructed or used for the purpose of making the sounds of music. In principle, anything that produces sound can serve as a musical instrument. The history of musical instruments dates back to the beginnings of human culture.
    canada
  • The CANADA! Party was an official political party in the province of Quebec from 1994 to 1998. It was founded on Canada Day 1994 by federalist Tony Kondaks, former top-aide to Equality Party leader Robert Libman Its name was initially called the Canada Party of Quebec/Parti Canada du Quebec but
  • #"Canada" (Barb Jungr, Michael Parker) – 3:37 #"Nothing Through the Letterbox Today" (Jungr, Parker) – 2:43 #"One Step Away from My Heart" (Jungr, Parker) – 4:09 #"Nights in a Suitcase" (Jungr, Parker) – 4:04 #"21 Years" (Jungr, Parker) – 3:37 #"The Chosen One" (Jungr, Parker) – 3:48 #"Walking
  • a nation in northern North America; the French were the first Europeans to settle in mainland Canada; "the border between the United States and Canada is the longest unguarded border in the world"
  • A country in northern North America, the second largest country in the world; pop. 32,507,900; capital, Ottawa; official languages, English and French
music instruments canada - Struggling for
Struggling for Perfection: The Story of Glen Gould (Stories of Canada)
Struggling for Perfection: The Story of Glen Gould (Stories of Canada)
Struggling for Perfection is the story of the famous pianist, an enigmatic figure who made some of the most acclaimed classical recordings of the last century. A former child prodigy and an unpredictable, passionate man, Glenn Gould was known as much for his eccentricities as his vast musical genius. After retiring prematurely from performing, Gould branched out into work in film and radio and helped bring classical music recording technology into a new age. He has became a national icon in Canada. Vladimir Konieczny delivers a sensitive and affectionate portrait of this imposing figure in music history. The book is illustrated with sketches and archival photos.

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Katheleen Solose
Katheleen Solose
Canadian pianist Kathleen Solose is an active performer of both the solo and chamber music repertoire. An internationally-trained musician, she continues the legacy of her teachers - among them Adele Marcus, (The Juilliard School), Stanislav Neuhaus (Moscow Conservatory), Guido Agosti (Accademia Chigiana, Siena, Italy) and Carlo Zecchi (Accademia di Santa Cecilia, Rome). Unanimous first-prize winner of the Casagrande International Competition in Italy and winner of CBC Canada’s National auditions for both solo and chamber music, Kathleen Solose has appeared in recital and with orchestras in Germany, Austria, Bulgaria, Italy, the United States, and Canada. She has also recorded for RAI-TV, Radio Svizzera Italiana, American Public Radio and CBC. Kathleen Solose has recorded a solo CD of Chopin’s Sonatas Op. 4 and Op. 35 as well as the Polonaise-Fantaisie in conjunction with CBC. Her repertoire is wide-ranging; she has commissioned new works and performed with the Toronto Array and New Music Ensembles. Research has taken her to St. Petersburg, Russia, where she was invited to perform a recital at the St. Petersburg University for Culture and Art in May of 2008. Professor Solose has initiated several chamber ensembles, including the Toronto Kammertrio and Musici Amati, and was Artistic Director and pianist of the Saskatoon Musici Amati Chamber Music Festival. She has performed with major artists including Pierre Henri Xuereb, Erika Raum and Paul Marleyn, and presently is pianist and Artistic Director of the Elixir Ensemble, which presents their first concert season in 2009-10. In 2001 Kathleen Solose acquired a 1814 Viennese fortepiano in order to explore the sounds of the Classical and early Romantic literature on a unique historic instrument. In the 2005-6 season she performed all five Beethoven piano concerti and the Triple Concerto on this instrument with the Saskatoon Symphony. She also performed a Schubert recital on an 1815 Viennese instrument by Antonio Marcus Thym at the National Music Museum in Vermillion, SD. The Solose Piano Duo (with Dr. Jane Solose, Associate Professor, UMKC) has toured Canada, the US and Hungary to great accolades. They have recorded a CD of Liszt, Rachmaninov, Chopin and Schubert. The Solose Duo performed at the American Liszt Society Festival in Washington, DC in May, 2008 and were invited to perform works by Rachmaninov and Stravinsky at the St. Petersburg Conservatory International Festival in October, 2008. A Master teacher, her students have been successful at national and international competitions. Prof. Solose has given Masterclasses at the prestigious Kansas City Conservatory (UMKC), as well as the Royal Conservatory of Music in Toronto, the University of Szeged (Hungary). Her CD’s are distributed by Eroica Classical Recordings. Kathleen Solose is Associate Professor at the University of Saskatchewan in Saskatoon, Canada.
Christmas Wish
Christmas Wish
..."Do not be afraid. I bring you good news of great joy that will be for all the people. Today in the town of David a Savior has been born to you; he is Christ[a] the Lord. This will be a sign to you: You will find a baby wrapped in cloths and lying in a manger." Luke 2:10-12

music instruments canada
music instruments canada
The Crooked Stovepipe: Athapaskan Fiddle Music and Square Dancing in Northeast Alaska and Northwest Canada (Music in American Life)
Named for a popular local fiddle tune, The Crooked Stovepipe is a rollicking, detailed, first-ever study of the indigenous fiddle music and social dancing enjoyed by the Gwich'in Athapaskan Indians and other tribal groups in northeast Alaska, the Yukon, and the northwest territories. Though the music has obvious roots in the British Isles, French Canada, and the American South, the Gwich'in have used it in shaping their own aesthetic, which is apparent in their choice of fiddle tunings, bowing techniques, foot clogging, and a distinctively stratified tune repertoire. Craig Mishler treats this rural subarctic artistic tradition as a distinctive regional style akin to Cajun, bluegrass, or string-band music. He uses convergence theory as the framework for showing how this aesthetic came about. His skillful use of personal anecdotes, interviews, music examples, dance diagrams, and photographs will appeal to general readers interested in folk music and dance, as well as to specialists.

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