CLUB QUARTERS HOTEL WASHINGTON. CLUB QUARTERS

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Club Quarters Hotel Washington


club quarters hotel washington
    hotel washington
  • The Hotel Washington was a building in Madison, Wisconsin built at the end of the 19th Century. It housed several businesses during the 1970s, 1980s and 1990s.
  • Where MGM arranged for Joan to stay upon her arrival in Hollywood in the winter of 1925.
    club quarters
  • Club Quarters is a chain of hotels with a presence in the US and London, UK. It has an unusual model allowing room bookings only by member companies.
club quarters hotel washington - Quarter Horse
Quarter Horse (Saddle Club(R))
Quarter Horse (Saddle Club(R))
The Saddle Club is nearing the end of their Oregon Trail ride. It's been a long ride, and it's about to get longer: Stevie Lake's competitive nature is taking over. When a boy on the trail ride boasts that he can do almost anything having to do with horses better than a mere girl, Stevie decides to take him up on the challenge. Before her friends know what's happened, Stevie is having a rodeo out West.

Has Stevie finally met her match? Can her friends stop this Wild West duel before things get out of hand? Or does this young cowboy have something else in mind when he challenges Stevie to a roping and hog-tying contest?

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The University Club of Washington DC
The University Club of Washington DC
Source: University Club of Washington DC website... The first organizational meeting of the University Club of Washington, DC was held at the new Willard Hotel on February 22, 1904. A historic spot in its own right, the Willard had just reopened (the first time). Sixty-six university and college alumni gathered to form the University Club - 24 other cities had already formed such clubs. The first clubhouse was located at 1726 I Street, NW. On the evening of March 11, 1904, the first President elected was then Secretary of War, William Howard Taft, an active Club member. Later the Club moved into its new quarters, a brownstone at 930 Sixteenth Street, NW. The Club developed a most appropriate theme: "Enter all of ye who have a degree of good fellowship and learning." Under Taft's guidance the Club membership grew, and in 1907, 364 members attended the annual banquet at the Raleigh Hotel. With growth and membership pledges, land was purchased at 15th and I Streets, NW, in 1909 to build a larger facility. Construction costs were raised from the sale of 2,000 shares @ $100 each. In 1912 former Club President and now President of the United States, William Howard Taft, laid the cornerstone. For almost two decades members let the good times roll .... then came the depression. Club revenues and membership took a turn for the worse and the Club became the headquarters for the United Mineworkers of America, under the leadership of John L. Lewis, who had engineered a low priced buyout. The old clubhouse at 15th and I Streets, NW, across from McPherson Square served as the UMW headquarters for many years and is currently being converted into luxury condominiums. During the roaring 20's, another prominent organization, the Racquet Club of Washington, decided to build their own facility at 1135 Sixteenth Street. It was dedicated by World War I hero General "Black Jack" Pershing in 1921. The Depression had its impact on the Racquet Club as well, and in 1936 the University Club members joined the Racquet Club members in their clubhouse. There was much discussion as to a new name as well as new membership categories, and the University Club of the City of Washington, DC, was selected as their new moniker. The Club flourished again in the 40's, as Washington rapidly grew from a sleepy southern town into a major world capital during World War II. Hard times had passed, and a waiting list for membership became lengthy. In preparation for the 50th Anniversary, a major renovation was performed on the Club premises, including hanging the famous red wallpaper throughout the Lobby and central stairway. During these ensuing years, the Club was a favorite residence for many Members of Congress. Tip O'Neill preferred the old card room on the third floor and nothing pleased him more than relieving his House colleague, Richard Nixon, of his monies at the poker table. It was a social gathering place for Justices Warren and Black during the era of the Warren Court. After controversy and consideration, the 80's brought the admission of women as members, the commencement of a $2.5 million renovation, and the establishment of the University Club Foundation. The addition of women members ended the tradition of nude sunbathing on the deck, and the basement's duck pin bowling alley was converted into the Athletic Center, which opened on New Year's Day 1990. In 1984 the University Club Foundation was formed as a separate nonprofit entity to support the Club Library and to continue programs which are charitable, educational, scientific, and literary in nature. The Club has undergone extensive renovations in the 1990's to improve the quality, efficiency, and use of the facilities. The overnight guest rooms have been overhauled with card entry, enlarged bathrooms, new furniture, and cable. The sixth and seventh floors include enhanced amenities for executives. The windows were replaced, bookcases were built into the rooms of University Hall, the Lobby stained, the Library painted, and the Franklin Room redecorated. The front driveway and Club entryway were replaced with stone pavers, gas lanterns, and new landscaping. The Pershing Grille was extensively renovated to include more seating, the creation of the Humidor room, and a more updated appearance. The Library was renamed the Keefer Memorial Library after a substantial gift in perpetuity to the Foundation was made by the late Leona Keefer to honor the memory of her husband, Arthur, who frequented the Club in the 1950's. The Second Century Plan, a $4.4 million construction project upgraded member services and clubhouse infrastructure and was completed in September 2003. These improvements include a larger Fitness Center, a new Private Day Spa, a new Ladies Locker Room, a new Sports Lounge overlooking the pool. a renovated University Hall and Governors Room, elevators upgrades and a new heating, ventilation
Washington Club
Washington Club
The Washington Club was founded in 1891 for “literary purposes, mutual improvement and the promotion of social intercourse.” The first president was Mrs. Elizabeth Blair Lee, wife of Admiral Samuel Phillips Lee, and daughter of Francis Preston Blair. Her family home, located across from the White House, presently serves as the guest house of the President of the United States. Organized with an educational and social mission, The Washington Club was the first women’s organization to be incorporated in the District of Columbia. Men were accorded privileges at the Club in 1979. It continues to enrich its members through its wide diversity of programs, excellent dining and beautiful surroundings. The library has been a noted feature of the Club since its inception. Consisting mainly of contributions from members, its contents have changed over the years to reflect the members' interests. As the number of books have outgrown the library space – at one time numbering 5,961 books – donations have been made to hospitals, school libraries and the Library of Congress. In addition to books, members’ gifts of furnishings and accessories also have been a long tradition. These gifts have helped to create the ambiance of a private home which distinguishes the Club and enhances the enjoyment of the members. The Club began meeting at The Richmond, a hotel located at that time on the northeast corner of 17th and H Streets, NW. As the membership grew and its quarters at The Richmond were deemed crowded, the Club moved one block west on H Street to The Everett in 1893. As the Club outgrew that space as well, the first clubhouse, at 1710 Eye Street, was purchased in 1894. In 1914 the Club purchased the former home of Vice President Charles Warren Fairbanks at 1701 K Street. This four-story building with twenty-three rooms had also served as the embassy for Imperial Russia. The Club moved into its current clubhouse at 15 Dupont Circle in 1951. Known as the Patterson mansion, it was built in 1900-1902 by Chicago Tribune Editor and Mrs. Robert W. Patterson of Chicago. She was the daughter of Joseph Medill, owner of the Chicago Tribune and progenitor of the Medill/Patterson/McCormick newspaper dynasty. The Pattersons commissioned Stanford White of the New York firm of McKim, Mead and White as the architect. The clubhouse remains the only intact example of Stanford White's work in Washington, DC. In 1923, Mrs. Patterson deeded the mansion to her daughter, then the Countess Gizycki. The latter eventually took the name of Eleanor Medill Patterson and became the owner/editor of the Times-Herald newspaper until her death in 1948. During the summer of 1927, when Eleanor "Cissy" Patterson was living in New York, she offered her home to President and Mrs. Calvin Coolidge as a temporary White House so that they would be comfortable while the White House underwent renovations. They accepted and in June of that year, Charles A. Lindbergh was the president’s guest in the house after his famous transatlantic flight. Eleanor Patterson willed the building and its furnishings to the American National Red Cross. The Washington Club purchased the home from the Red Cross in 1951 and has conducted its activities there until today. Recognitions which have been granted to the clubhouse include “District of Columbia Historic Site” (1964), “National Register of Historic Places” (1972), and the “1974 Massachusetts Avenue Historic District.”

club quarters hotel washington
club quarters hotel washington
Fat Quarter Winners: 11 New Quilt Projects from Open Gate (Quiltmaker's Club--More Patterns for Less)
What makes this fat-quarter quilt book different is its emphasis on using every last bit of each piece of fabric — from block to backing to binding, nothing is wasted. Each project includes Monica Dillard's clever shortcuts as well as streamlined techniques for easy piecing. Each pair of blocks creates interesting secondary patterns when they're combined to reveal a more complex look. You'll get terrific results stitching up these classic, traditional favorites from your stash of fat quarters.

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