MANHATTAN HOTEL AT TIMES SQUARE - AT TIMES SQUARE

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Manhattan Hotel At Times Square


manhattan hotel at times square
    times square
  • the area of Manhattan around the intersection of Broadway and Seventh Avenue; heart of the New York theater district; site of annual celebration of New Year's
  • Times Square is a two-block long street in downtown Detroit, Michigan, originally named for the Detroit Times newspaper, whose building once stood on the street by the square.
  • A focal point of Manhattan in New York City, around the intersection of Broadway and 42nd Street. Its long-held reputation for seediness is giving way to redevelopment
  • Times Square – 42nd Street is the busiest station complex of the New York City Subway, joining four lines (three trunk lines plus the 42nd Street Shuttle), with a free transfer via a passageway to a fifth (42nd Street – Port Authority Bus Terminal on the IND Eighth Avenue Line ('''''').
    manhattan
  • one of the five boroughs of New York City
  • A cocktail made of whiskey and vermouth, sometimes with a dash of bitters
  • The Manhattan was a United States ship under Mercator Cooper that made the first authorized visit from U.S. citizen to Tokyo Bay in 1845.
  • a cocktail made with whiskey and sweet vermouth with a dash of bitters
    hotel
  • In French contexts an hotel particulier is an urban "private house" of a grand sort. Whereas an ordinary maison was built as part of a row, sharing party walls with the houses on either side and directly fronting on a street, an hotel particulier was often free-standing, and by the eighteenth
  • A hotel is an establishment that provides paid lodging on a short-term basis. The provision of basic accommodation, in times past, consisting only of a room with a bed, a cupboard, a small table and a washstand has largely been replaced by rooms with modern facilities, including en-suite
  • An establishment providing accommodations, meals, and other services for travelers and tourists
  • A code word representing the letter H, used in radio communication
  • a building where travelers can pay for lodging and meals and other services
manhattan hotel at times square - The Devil's
The Devil's Playground: A Century of Pleasure and Profit in Times Square
The Devil's Playground: A Century of Pleasure and Profit in Times Square
As Times Square turns 100, New York Times Magazine contributing writer James Traub tells the story of how this mercurial district became one of the most famous and exciting places in the world. The Devil’s Playground is classic and colorful American history, from the first years of the twentieth century through the Runyonesque heyday of nightclubs and theaters in the 1920s and ’30s, to the district’s decline in the 1960s and its glittering corporate revival in the 1990s.

First, Traub gives us the great impresarios, wits, tunesmiths, newspaper columnists, and nocturnal creatures who shaped Times Square over the century since the place first got its name: Oscar Hammerstein, Florenz Ziegfeld, George S. Kaufman, Damon Runyon, Walter Winchell, and “the Queen of the Nightclubs,” Texas Guinan; bards like A. J. Liebling, Joe Mitchell, and the Beats, who celebrated the drug dealers and pimps of 42nd Street. He describes Times Square’s notorious collapse into pathology and the fierce debates over how best to restore it to life.

Traub then goes on to scrutinize today’s Times Square as no author has yet done. He writes about the new 42nd Street, the giant Toys “R” Us store with its flashing Ferris wheel, the new world of corporate theater, and the sex shops trying to leave their history behind.
More than sixty years ago, Liebling called Times Square “the heart of the world”—not just the center of the world, though this crossroads in Midtown Manhattan was indeed that, but its heart. From the dawn of the twentieth century through the 1950s, Times Square was the whirling dynamo of American popular culture and, increasingly, an urban sanctuary for the eccentric and the untamed. The name itself became emblematic of the tremendous life force of cities everywhere.

Today, Times Square is once again an awe-inspiring place, but the dark and strange corners have been filled with blazing light. The most famous street character on Broadway, “the Naked Cowboy,” has his own website, and Toys “R” Us calls its flagship store in Times Square “the toy center of the universe.” For the giant entertainment corporations that have moved to this safe, clean, and self-consciously gaudy spot, Times Square is still very much the center of the world. But is it still the heart?


From the Hardcover edition.

76% (10)
Times Square: Morning
Times Square: Morning
Times Square, Midtown Manhattan, New York City, New York, United States The Times Square area, recognized world-wide as a major entertainment center, has played an important role in the cultural life of New York City in the twentieth century. Known today as the Broadway theater district, this area encompasses the largest concentration of legitimate playhouses in the world. With the meteoric rise of the the motion picture industry, Times Square in the 1920s was also transformed by the arrival of elaborate and luxurious movie theaters, or "palaces," which celebrated this popular and new form of entertainment. Complete with fashionable hotels such as the Hotel Astor (demolished), restaurants, and dance halls, Times Square began early in this century to attract visitors and New Yorkers alike to its thriving night life. The area also became home to scenery, lighting, and costume companies, and the offices of agents and producers, thus creating a busy hub of activity in all branches of the entertainment business. It was fitting, therefore, that the Famous P1ayers-Lasky Corporation, (now Paramount Pictures) while still in its infancy selected Times Square for its East Coast headquarters and showcase theater. The development of the Times Square area was primarily a result of the steady northward movement of Manhattan's population, abetted by the growth of mass transportation. A district of farmlands and rural summer homes in the early 1800s, Long Acre Square (now Times Square) evolved into an urban center following the opening of the Grand Central Depot and the completion of the Third and Sixth Avenue Elevated Railways in 1871. In 1904, New York's subway system began operation, with a major station at Broadway and 42nd Street. At this time, the area was also renamed Times Square in honor of the recently erected Times Building. The theater district, which had existed in the midst of stores, hotels, and commercial buildings along lower Broadway for most of the nineteenth century, moved northward along Broadway in stages, locating first at Union Square, then Madison Square, and then Herald Square. By the end of the century, the district was extended even further north by far-sighted theater managers, such as Oscar Hammerstein, who opened the Lyric in his Olympia Theater complex on Broadway between 44th and 45th Streets in 1895. Before the installation of electric street lamps, Long Acre Square, which had been chiefly occupied by carriage shops and livery stables, was a dark and dangerous area popularly known as "Thieves' Lair." By the 1920s, the peak of Times Square development, the Con Edison Company estimated that one million lightbulbs were contained within the famous marquees, signboards, and advertisements that lit up what had come to be known as the Great White Way. This phrase is credited to an advertising businessman named O.J. Gude, who recognized the exciting potential of electric sign display by installing the first in 1901, on Broadway and 23rd Street, which advertised a seaside resort.^ Apart from periods during the World Wars, the brilliant streams of light and color have continued to emanate from Times Square.
Times Square news ticker
Times Square news ticker
Times Square, Midtown Manhattan, New York City, New York, United States The Times Square area, recognized world-wide as a major entertainment center, has played an important role in the cultural life of New York City in the twentieth century. Known today as the Broadway theater district, this area encompasses the largest concentration of legitimate playhouses in the world. With the meteoric rise of the the motion picture industry, Times Square in the 1920s was also transformed by the arrival of elaborate and luxurious movie theaters, or "palaces," which celebrated this popular and new form of entertainment. Complete with fashionable hotels such as the Hotel Astor (demolished), restaurants, and dance halls, Times Square began early in this century to attract visitors and New Yorkers alike to its thriving night life. The area also became home to scenery, lighting, and costume companies, and the offices of agents and producers, thus creating a busy hub of activity in all branches of the entertainment business. It was fitting, therefore, that the Famous P1ayers-Lasky Corporation, (now Paramount Pictures) while still in its infancy selected Times Square for its East Coast headquarters and showcase theater. The development of the Times Square area was primarily a result of the steady northward movement of Manhattan's population, abetted by the growth of mass transportation. A district of farmlands and rural summer homes in the early 1800s, Long Acre Square (now Times Square) evolved into an urban center following the opening of the Grand Central Depot and the completion of the Third and Sixth Avenue Elevated Railways in 1871. In 1904, New York's subway system began operation, with a major station at Broadway and 42nd Street. At this time, the area was also renamed Times Square in honor of the recently erected Times Building. The theater district, which had existed in the midst of stores, hotels, and commercial buildings along lower Broadway for most of th

manhattan hotel at times square
manhattan hotel at times square
Tales of Times Square: Expanded Edition
“Friedman has drawn a vivid picture of the Times Square area and its denizens. He writes about the porn palaces with live sex shows, and the men and women who perform in them, prostitutes and their pimps, the runaways who will likely be the next decade's prostitutes, the clergymen who fight the smut merchants and the cops who feel impotent in the face of the judiciary.”—Publishers Weekly
This classic account of the ultra-sleazy, pre-Disneyfied era of Times Square is now the subject of a documentary film of the same name to be theatrically released this year. With this edition, Tales of Times Square returns to print with seven new chapters.

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