DECORATIVE MOULDING IDEAS - DECORATIVE MOULDING

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Decorative Moulding Ideas


decorative moulding ideas
    decorative moulding
  • Molding (USA) or moulding (AUS, CAN, UK) is a strip of material with various cross sections used to cover transitions between surfaces or for decoration. It is traditionally made from solid milled wood or plaster but may be made from plastic or reformed wood.
    ideas
  • A concept or mental impression
  • (idea) the content of cognition; the main thing you are thinking about; "it was not a good idea"; "the thought never entered my mind"
  • A thought or suggestion as to a possible course of action
  • An opinion or belief
  • (idea) mind: your intention; what you intend to do; "he had in mind to see his old teacher"; "the idea of the game is to capture all the pieces"
  • (idea) a personal view; "he has an idea that we don't like him"

Joan Collins
Joan Collins
Italian postcard by Ed. Ris. Rotalfoto S.p.A., Milano (Milan) in the series Artisti di Sempre, nr. 295. Glamorous English actress Joan Collins (1933) is one of the great survivors of the cinema. She began in the early 1950’s as a starlet of the British film. 20th Century Fox brought her to Hollywood as their answer to Elizabeth Taylor. In the 1970’s she was the ‘Queen of the B-pictures’, but in the 1980’s Joan became the highest-paid TV star, thanks to Dynasty. Joan Henrietta Collins was born in Paddington, London in 1933 (some sources say 1931 or 1935). She was the daughter of Elsa (nee Bessant), a dance teacher and nightclub hostess, and Joseph William Collins, an agent whose clients would later included Shirley Bassey, The Beatles and Tom Jones. She has one sister, the author Jackie Collins, and a brother, real estate agent Bill Collins. Joan was educated at the Francis Holland School and then trained at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art (RADA). In 1951, she made her feature debut in a small role as a beauty contestant in the comedy Lady Godiva Rides Again (1951, Frank Launder). The next year she left RADA and starred in the crime drama Cosh Boy (1952, Lewis Gilbert), and as a juvenile delinquent in I Believe in You (1952, Basil Dearden, Michael Relph). The Rank Organisation then took an interest in Joan and gave her a contract. Rank set about moulding Joan into their idea of a well-groomed film star. They entrusted her to Cornel Lucas, their top stills photographer. Lucas, who was married to Belinda Lee at the time, produced the first really glamorous photographs of Joan. Collins was a popular magazine pin-up in the UK throughout the 1950s and into the 1960s. The Rank Organisation also cast Joan in a succession of undistinguished films, plus the interesting thriller The Good Die Young (1954, Lewis Gilbert) in which she starred opposite Laurence Harvey. Rank loaned her out to Howard Hawks, who was making Land Of The Pharaohs (1955) in Rome. Joan played the star role as an scheming, unscrupulous Egyptian Princess. This assignment led to a contract with 20th Century-Fox, where despite a few good dramatic parts , in particular Girl on the Red Velvet Swing (1955, Richard Fleischer) and the grim western The Bravados (1958, Henry King), she was written off by critics as decorative but nothing more. In the 1960’s she was perilously close to ‘perennial starlet’ status, but she made notable guest appearances on American tv series as Batman, Mission: Impossible, and Star Trek. By the 1970’s she was the uncrowned queen of European B-pictures like the thriller Revenge (1971, Sidney Hayers), the SF-mystery Quest for Love (1971, Ralph Thomas) and the horror film Dark Places (1973, Don Sharp) with Christopher Lee. Then she starred in the film versions of her sister Jackie Collins' racy novels The Stud (1978, Quentin Masters) and The Bitch (1979, Gerry O'Hara). The films were smash hits in England, but also despised by the international critics. Early Joan Collins had developed a reputation for being adventurous and gamesome in her private life. In Hollywood she was affectionately known as ‘The British Open’ because of her liberal lifestyle. She first married Irish actor Maxwell Reed in 1952, and the couple divorced in 1956. In 1959, she embarked on an affair with an as-then-unknown Warren Beatty, four years her junior, which would last for two years. In 1963 she married actor Anthony Newley. They had two children, a daughter Tara Newley and a son, Alexander Newley. Collins and Newley divorced in 1970. In 1972 she married her third husband Ron Kass, who had been the president of Apple Records during the reign of The Beatles. During their marriage Collins had her third and final child, daughter Katyana Kass. In 1981, Collins' was offered a role in the then-struggling new prime time soap opera Dynasty (1981-1989) playing Alexis, the vengeful ex-wife of tycoon Blake Carrington (John Forsythe). The role successfully relaunched Collins as a powerful sex symbol and icon of independence. Her performance is generally credited as one factor in the fledgling show's subsequent rise to a hit rivaling Dallas. In 1985, Dynasty was the #1 show in the U.S., and Collins became the highest-paid tv actress at the time. As Alexis, Collins was nominated six times for a Golden Globe Award, winning once in 1983. Delighting the audience in attendance at the ceremony, Joan thanked Sophia Loren for turning down the part of Alexis. Collins' marriage to Kass ended in divorce in 1983, although they remained very close until his death from cancer in 1986. At the height of Dynasty's popularity in 1985, Collins married Swedish singer Peter Holm. They were divorced two years later. With Dynasty at the height of its success, Collins began producing and starred in two CBS miniseries, Sins (1986, Douglas Hickox) and Monte Carlo (1986, Anthony Page). She also appeared on the cover of and in a twelve-page layout shot by George Hur
Olympic Decorative Carved Moulding from the First-Class Staircase
Olympic Decorative Carved Moulding from the First-Class Staircase
Outstanding example of decorative carved moulding from the first-class staircase. Made from quarter-cut English oak, this frieze was installed near the ceiling level of the first-class staircase foyers. Each section of this magnificent moulding was hand carved and shows an attention to detail that is unimaginable today

decorative moulding ideas
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