WHITE CANVAS ROMAN SHADE : WHITE CANVAS

WHITE CANVAS ROMAN SHADE : CURTAIN BLINDS.

White Canvas Roman Shade


white canvas roman shade
    white canvas
  • Used for theatrical corsets in order to give a strong character quality.
  • Lifelines is the seventh album released in 2002 by the Norwegian band a-ha. This album entered to top 10 album charts in 9 countries and 4 of those in top, selling over 2,5 million copies.
    roman shade
  • (Roman Shades) Drawn up from the bottom by means of cords and rings, these shades create horizontal folds when raised. A roman shade panel is flat when lowered and covers the window glass completely.
  • A tailored fabric window shade that folds sideways. Find
  • UpA fabric shade that folds up accordion-style from the bottom, usually operated by lift cord.
white canvas roman shade - Park B.
Park B. Smith Canvas 40 by 72 Magic Blind, White
Park B. Smith Canvas 40 by 72 Magic Blind, White
The Canvas Magic Blind is a solid design of substantial 100-percent Cotton. Hangs like a curtain, works like a blind. Magic Blinds let you create the look of a Roman blind effortlessly. What makes Magic Blinds magic? Each blind has a built in self-locking hardware. Government approved safety kit included. No Mess, No Fuss. Simply hang on any curtain rod. Magic Blinds which hang on any curtain rod are typically hung outside the window. Simply choose the next size up from your window measurement. Spot clean or professionally dry clean. Imported.

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Jerusalem
Jerusalem
Eastern Orthodox Church on the side of the Mount of Olives, very close to the Garden of Gethsemane. The base of the hill is in the Kidron Valley Built on the slopes of the Mount of Olives by Alexander III of Russia, the Church of St. Mary Magdalene is probably the most conspicuous house of worship in Jerusalem. It owes its prominence to the presence of seven gilded, onion-shaped domes jutting out from a monumental Muscovite-style body that stands proudly against the sky. While the church was dedicated to Alexander's mother Maria, it was called the Church of St. Mary Magdalene after her name- saint. One of the best-known women in the New Testament, it was Mary Magdalene from whose body Jesus exorcised the seven demons in Mark 16:9. Mary was present at the Crucifixion and was the first person to see Jesus after the Resurrection. From a distance what you see of St. Mary Magdalene are its memorable bulb-like cupolas. But if you enter the closure in which it is found and climb the steps to the church, you discover that the building is as remarkable as its domes. Indeed, the palatial exterior features a mind-boggling variety of styles and decorations that is fascinating to behold. Although it appears to be made of marble, the facade is actually a stunning, sculpted white sandstone. Classic, with Roman-style arches, the first story of the magnificent structure has solid, graceful lines. Above the main entrance, located on the second level, is a gabled roof trimmed with a pseudo-lace design. A circular blue mosaic depicting Mary Magdalene piously robed in white is framed in gold within the gable. The third floor is embellished with an upside-down serrated roof, scalloped windows, and pretty arches. At the top are the striking bulbous domes, each crowned by a tall gilded Russian Orthodox cross. The bell tower is ringed with squat squarish pillars and shaped like a rook, and above the bells is a large silver cone with several chapel-shaped windows. A dome with a protruding cross caps the bell tower structure. Over the iconastasis - the eastern orthodox partition which separates the prayer hall from the sanctuary - is an enormous canvas by Ivanov. It illustrates a popular legend in which Mary travels to Rome to tell Emperor Tiberius of Jesus' unfair trial and unjust sentence. It is said that Mary held an egg in her hand, representing life. But it turned red when she handed it to the emperor, thus becoming a living symbol of Jesus' blood and the Resurrection. Quite possibly, the Christian custom of dying eggs on Easter is related to Mary's presentation of a red egg as a tribute to the emperor. The church's iconastasis is a work of art. It consists of beautifully carved white marble, and painted bronze screens decorated with Vereshoguine's splendid illustrations. Six tiny paintings on the door depict the four evangelists, the Virgin Mary, and the angel Gabriel. Shades of brown and a variety of patterns dominate the walls, arches, and ceiling. In many other elaborate sanctuaries sculpted animals and flowers are carved under the arches, but here they are adorned with painted designs. Other highlights include a large chandelier which utilizes small oil lamps for light (electricity is not used in the sanctuary) and a very special icon of Mary Magdalene that contains a relic from the sainted woman's bones. The marble floor with its colored geometric shapes resembles that of another Russian Orthodox church, St. Alexander Nevsky (see page 50). Inside a beautiful, hand-carved wooden frame is a unique sixteenth-century icon of the Virgin Mary holding her infant son. Believed to have miraculous powers of healing, the painting stood in a Lebanese church for several hundred years. Although this icon and a small part of the altar were saved from destruction after the church burned to the ground, the icon, buried beneath the rubble, had turned black. Miraculously, it began to lighten during the journey to its new home in Jerusalem, more than half a century ago
The Women of Amphissa.
The Women of Amphissa.
Dionysus (Roman name Bacchus), Greek Olympian god of vine, wine and mystic ecstasy. Orgies in favor of Bacchus are bacchanals. According to classical mythology, the god’s favorite island was Andros, where rivers ran with wine instead of water. The Greek city of Amphissa, or Salona, was also a center for the cult of Dionysus. Alma-Tadema The Woman of Amphissa. Here a group of exhausted female bacchantes are waking up after a night of bacchic revels, and being tended by local women The Women of Amphissa is one of Sir Lawrance Alma-Tadema's final paintings in which he portrays a dated historical event. Known for his preoccupation with quotidian views of Rome, Alma-Tadema renders these scenes with photo-realistic precision and care for the aesthetic. The Women of Amphissa is no exception. Through his archaizing views, Alma-Tadema provides Victorian society a glimpse into the classical world, allowing them to identify with its inhabitants and imagine its wonder. Amphissa was the capitol of an annual festival in honor of the god Bacchus. In 350 B.C., the territory was over-run by an army from Phocis, stirring fear that the bacchantes would become vulnerable after their celebrating to attack by the enemy soldiers. The women of Amphissa consequently stepped in to protect the sleeping bacchantes throughout the night, guarding them from being ravished by the opponent. Alma-Tadema portrays dawn at the Amphissian marketplace the morning after, its women serving food, standing watch, and caring for the exhausted Bacchantes. (source) The material details of this painting lend themselves to fleshing out the themes inherent to painting — protection, femininity, and hospitality. Alma-Tadema pays careful attention to surfaces, calling attention to the flowers, water, food, animal skins, vases, portraying the vast abundance of provisions for the weary, and highlighting the generosity of the women of Amphissa. The architectural details also play an important role. Visibly enveloped in the sturdy stone construction of the marketplace, the bacchantes are protected not only by the individuals surrounding them, but also by the architecture. Alma-Tadema draws an interesting parallel between the row of standing women in the center of the painting, and the row of columns framing the right-hand side. With this juxtaposition, the artist suggests the strength of these women, as they surround the sleeping ladies with as similar strength to the neighboring structure. According to one observer, "an assortment of south Italian and Athenian painted vases are combined anachronistically with the larger silver krater from the Roman Hildesheim treasure," (of which the artist owned a replica). This anachronism serves two purposes. First, it suggests the timelessness of this scene, suggesting that hospitality towards one's fellow man could happen in the Athens, Amphissa, or Victorian Britain. Second, it harkens back to more than one time in antiquity, enabling the artist to showcase his artistic prowess in rendering material objects spanning the classical period. Finally, it should be noted that the color white dominates the artist's palette. The sky, the flowers, the awnings, the pillars, the floor-tiles, and the robes of many of the women are all some shade of white. The presence of this shade suggests redemption for the bacchantes, and mercy on the part of the providers. There seem to be few scenes in art history depicting women helping women. David, echoing Poussin in his Rape of the Sabine Women, depicts the heroic Hersilia instilling peace in the face of Roman/Sabine war. Alma-Tadema, instead of a single heroine, portrays numerous female benefactors, blending them among those in need. The Women of Amphissa, therefore, portrays humanity- and femininity, at their best.

white canvas roman shade
white canvas roman shade
Keds Kids' Original Champion CVO Canvas Sneaker,White,13 M US Little Kid
Kids Keds Champion Original sneaker in white canvas with laces. This is a classic, easy shoe that works all year round. Cotton terry lining and latex foam sock liner add comfort. Timeless style, with a hint of childhood nostalgia from mothers (and even grandmothers) make this shoe a practical, easy to match choice. Construction: Canvas upper with laces, rubber non-marking sole. Product Code: Keds Champion sneaker in white canvas KT31577F. Keds Champion Sneaker In 1916, Keds created an American Classic called "the Champion." It has remained a style icon for over ninety years. Worn by Audrey Hepburn, Marilyn Monroe and Jackie O, and consistently celebrated by Vogue and Elle magazines. Keds Kids Not every shoe company that can claim a word like sneaker as their own. 'Sneaker' was coined by agent Henry McKinney refering to Keds noiseless rubber soles, allowed the wearer to 'sneak' up on others Since then, Keds has grown into an American icon, worn by celebrities and featured prominently on iconic TV shows like Saved by the Bell, Full House, Step by Step and 7th Heaven. With its American style and youthful optimism, Kids Keds are reaching a new generation, mixing vintage style with childhood fun Size

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