SHADE GARDEN LAYOUTS. SHADE GARDEN

Shade garden layouts. Shademaker awnings. Enclosed blinds for patio doors

Shade Garden Layouts


shade garden layouts
    shade garden
  • Shade gardens are gardens planted and grown in areas with little or no direct sunlight during the day, either under trees or on the shady sides of buildings. Shade gardening presents certain challenges, in part because only certain plants are able to grow in shady conditions.
    layouts
  • The process of setting out material on a page or in a work
  • The way in which the parts of something are arranged or laid out
  • (layout) a plan or design of something that is laid out
  • (Layout (computing)) In computing, layout is the process of calculating the position of objects in space subject to various constraints. This functionality can be part of an application or packaged as a reusable component or library. Web browser engines are sometimes called layout engines.
  • (layout) the act of laying out (as by making plans for something)
  • The way in which text or pictures are set out on a page
shade garden layouts - The Natural
The Natural Shade Garden
The Natural Shade Garden
Ken Druse's Natural Garden Guides:
Award-winning gardening expert Ken Druse offers a personal selection of 80 ideal plants for the natural gardener, drawn from his best-selling classic The Natural Shade Garden.

This companion guide is illustrated throughout with 130 of Druse's spectacular color photo-graphs. All-new descriptions discuss the origins of each plant, supply the pronunciation of their Latin names, and offer information on their ultimate size, time of bloom, light and soil requirements, cold hardiness, and special interest, such as colorful berries or butterfly attraction.

Here, too, is indispensable advice for using these plants with companions to create striking designs. Each section has an original introduction presenting valuable techniques for making your own natural garden. An appendix gives mail-order sources.

In 80 Great Natural Shade Garden Plants Ken Druse selects the best plants for natural gardening in the shade: Ornamental Shrubs ? Perennials for Flowers ? Perennials for Foliage ? Ground Covers and Vines ? The Best Hostas ? The Best Ferns

Shade can be a gardener's curse or delight, depending on how it's managed. Even a heavy grove of mature trees needn't have bare ground beneath; they can be surrounded with any number of shade-loving foliage, grasses, or grasslike ground covers, including galax, dichondra, ivy, vinca, wintergreen, maidenhair fern... the list of possibilities is a long one. Druse himself gardens in the shadow of a Brooklyn brownstone, so his advice is by no means limited to gardeners with woodland acreage. This book also successfully punctures the myth that a shady flower garden must be colored in greens and subtle pastels: a parade of brilliant camellias, columbines, clematis, and primula proves that a shade gardener's crayon box is as varied as any, and the well-organized Druse sorts the herbaceous perennials by color in an addendum at the back of the book.

80% (19)
West Garden - Eastman House
West  Garden  -  Eastman   House
This is a section of the West Garden at the Eastman House. Now a little bit of history: The West Garden, originally called the "sunken garden", was designed by architect Claude Bragdon and built in 1917. It was modeled after an English walled garden designed by Sir Edwin Lutyens & Gertrude Jekyll at Hestercombe House in Somerst, England. It was built on the site of the Ross house, which George Eastman had demolished after purchasing the land west of his existing property. As a matter of fact, the north and south retaining walls were built of stones from the Ross house. Here, you can see the stone garden house which is reminiscent of Hestercombe's orangery, with a tiled wall fountain featuring a small lion's head within. The structure still supports Eastman's original wisteria vines and offers visitors a shaded spot with benches to rest on. The Japanese maples that anchor each corner of this border are modern substitutes for the originals. The north and south garden borders and four central beds once held a profusion of perennials and bulbs. An armillary sphere, a sculptural model of celestial spheres was placed in the center of the garden. Designed by American sculptor Paul Manship, it is composed of interlocking rings that indicate the location of imaginery circles such as the meridian and the tropics, and also functions as a sundial. George Eastman originally purchased this in 1921, and Lawrence Grant White of McKim, Mead & White designed a granite base for it. In 1936 , the garden was altered using Robert Chamberlain's design recommendations. The central flower beds were replaced with truf and the raised beds at the perimeter of the garden were retained as floral features. The garden was again redesigned in the 1960s by Nancy Newhall, wife of the then museum director. The geometric beds of turf and the flagstone walks were removed and a central octogonal pond was installed., surrounded by semi-circular beds of colorful bulbs and annuals. In 1983 & 1984, the Rochester Garden Club sponsored a partial restoration of Bragdon's original plan. The discovery of Bragdon's original garden plan, together with a number of historical photographs, enabled landscape architect Katherine Wilson Rahn to facilitate an authentic restoration of the garden layout. Original walkways and bed configurations were accurately restored, however, ornamental shrubs were substituted for the many flowers that once bloomed in the garden in order to ease the demands of the Museum's grounds maintenance. Located at the George Eastman House & Gardens, 900 East Ave in Rochester, NY.
West Garden - Eastman House
West  Garden   - Eastman  House
A look at the west garden at the George Eastman House. The west garden, originally called the sunken garden, was designed by architect Claude Bragdon and built in 1917. It was modeled after an English walled garden designed by Sir Edwin Lutyens. It was built on the site of the Ross House, which Eastman had demolished after purchasing the land west of his existing property. The north and south retaining walls were built of stone from the Ross house. The garden consists of a stone garden house, with a tiled wall fountain featuring a small lion's head. The structure still supports Eastman's original wisteria vines and offers visitors a shaded spot with benches upon which to to rest. The north and south garden borders and four central beds once held a profusion of perennials and bulbs. An armillary sphere, a sculptural model of the celestial spheres, was placed in the center of the garden. Designed by American sculptor Paul Manship, it is composed of interlocking rings that indicate the location of imaginary circles such as the meridian and the tropics, and also functions as a sundial. Eastman originally purchased this in 1921, and Lawrence Grant White of Mc Kim, Mead & White designed a granite base for it. In 1936 the garden was altered using Robert Chamberlain's design recommendations. The central flower beds were replaced with turf and the raised beds at the perimeter of the garden were retained as floral features. The west garden was again redesigned in the 1960s by Nancy Newhall. The geometric beds of turf and the flagstone walks were removed. in 1983 & 1984, the Rochester Garden Club sponsored the partial restoration of Bragdon's original plan. The discovery of Bragdon's original garden plan, together with historical photographs, enabled landscape architect Katharine Wilson Rahn to facilitate an authentic restoration of the garden layout. Original walkways and bed configurations were accurately restored, ornamental shrubs were substituted for many flowers that once bloomed in the garden in order to ease the demands of the Museum's grounds maintenance. Located at 900 East Ave in Rochester, NY.

shade garden layouts
shade garden layouts
Shade: Planting Solutions for Shady Gardens
Shade is a reality in nearly every garden, and this guide will help any gardener, experienced or inexperienced, take full advantage of those sometimes tricky shady areas. After looking at shade in different situations — in different sizes and types of gardens, in specific areas within the garden such as hedges and other barriers, and in vertical elements such as pergolas and arches — the book then considers the characteristics of shade-loving plants, looking at brightly colored flowers as well as at plants with distinct types of foliage. Readers will also learn how to use plant companions to create striking designs in addition to the practicalities of preparing, planting, and maintaining a shade garden.

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