THIS WEEK

(Items that are bold, italicized, and underlined will be collected for a grade.)
(All other items are to be studied for assessments.)

Monday 2/25/19 (Day 1 of Lesson)
  • Students will respond to a released iLEAP question describing the ideology of transcendentalism as the belief that human beings have control over their fates.
  • Students will be shown copies of The Scarlet Letter, A Tell Tale Heart, Moby Dick, and Uncle Tom's Cabin.
  • Students will be provided background on the DVD Moby Dick portraying transcendentalism in the character Captain Ahab regarding rage, revenge, obsession, confrontation, and doom.
  • Teacher will pause DVD Moby Dick at certain points and relate it to prior knowledge that was studied in previous lessons on the Age of Reform.
  • While viewing the DVD Moby Dick, students will construct a graphic organizer citing examples of transcendentalist concepts and the importance of the individual conscience regarding rage, revenge, obsession, confrontation, and doom.
  • Students will summarize the transcendentalism observed in the DVD Moby Dick, add their own thoughts about the conflicts, both internal and external, and construct a clarifying statement or question for discussion.
Tuesday 2/26/19 (Day 2 of Lesson)
  • Students will respond to a released iLEAP question describing the ideology of transcendentalism as the belief that human beings have control over their fates.
  • Students will be shown copies of The Scarlet LetterA Tell Tale HeartMoby Dick, and Uncle Tom's Cabin.
  • Students will be provided background on the DVD Moby Dick portraying transcendentalism in the character Captain Ahab regarding rage, revenge, obsession, confrontation, and doom.
  • Teacher will pause DVD Moby Dick at certain points and relate it to prior knowledge that was studied in previous lessons on the Age of Reform.
  • While viewing the DVD Moby Dick, students will construct a graphic organizer citing examples of transcendentalist concepts and the importance of the individual conscience regarding rage, revenge, obsession, confrontation, and doom.
  • Students will summarize the transcendentalism observed in the DVD Moby Dick, add their own thoughts about the conflicts, both internal and external, and construct a clarifying statement or question for discussion.
Wednesday 2/27/19 (Day 3 of Lesson)
  • Students will respond to a released iLEAP question describing the ideology of transcendentalism as the belief that human beings have control over their fates.
  • Students will be shown copies of The Scarlet LetterA Tell Tale HeartMoby Dick, and Uncle Tom's Cabin.
  • Students will be provided background on the DVD Moby Dick portraying transcendentalism in the character Captain Ahab regarding rage, revenge, obsession, confrontation, and doom.
  • Teacher will pause DVD Moby Dick at certain points and relate it to prior knowledge that was studied in previous lessons on the Age of Reform.
  • While viewing the DVD Moby Dick, students will construct a graphic organizer citing examples of transcendentalist concepts and the importance of the individual conscience regarding rage, revenge, obsession, confrontation, and doom.
  • Students will summarize the transcendentalism observed in the DVD Moby Dick, add their own thoughts about the conflicts, both internal and external, and construct a clarifying statement or question for discussion.
Thursday 2/28/19 (Day 1 of Lesson)
  • Students will complete the test on Chapter 14 "The Age of Reform".
Friday 3/1/19 (Day 2 of Lesson)
  • Students will complete the test on Chapter 14 "The Age of Reform".





LAST WEEK

(Items that are bold, italicized, and underlined will be collected for a grade.)
(All other items are to be studied for assessments.)

Monday 2/18/19 (Day 1 of Lesson)
  • Students will respond to a released iLEAP question describing how most abolitionists, both black and white, in the 1830's supported the immediate emancipation of all slaves.
  • Students will view a clip on Discovery Education tracing the establishment of the American Colonization Society in 1817 and its attempts to return freed slaves to the African continent.
  • Students will define the words abolitionist and Underground Railroad.
  • Students will read pp. 418-424 in Chapter 14 "Age of Reform".
  • Students will construct/discuss notes 11-20 on the assigned reading covering the early efforts to end slavery, the Abolitionist Movement, the American Colonization Society and the establishment of the Republic of Liberia, William Lloyd Garrison, the Grimke Sisters, the role of black abolitionists, Frederick Douglass, Sojourner Truth, the role of Harriet Tubman in the Underground Railroad, differing opinions over abolitionism, opposition to abolition in the North, and the Southern reaction to the Abolitionist Movement. 
  • Students will complete a reading exercise analyzing the differing views held by abolitionists and the different tactics used by them in their movement against the institution of slavery.
  • Students will create a freedom quilt by sketching landmarks and physical features in squares as directions for escaped slaves to follow as they journey along the Underground Railroad to freedom in the North.
  • Learning Log # 10 Write directions for a Kindergartner to get from your class to the gym. If you were writing these directions for an adult, would they be different? Which is easier for you: writing directions, drawing a map, or telling someone how to get from one place to another?
  • On p. 424 in the text, students will copy and answer question 2-5.
Tuesday 2/19/19 (Day 2 of Lesson)
  • Students will respond to a released iLEAP question describing how most abolitionists, both black and white, in the 1830's supported the immediate emancipation of all slaves.
  • Students will view a clip on Discovery Education tracing the establishment of the American Colonization Society in 1817 and its attempts to return freed slaves to the African continent.
  • Students will define the words abolitionist and Underground Railroad.
  • Students will read pp. 418-424 in Chapter 14 "Age of Reform".
  • Students will construct/discuss notes 11-20 on the assigned reading covering the early efforts to end slavery, the Abolitionist Movement, the American Colonization Society and the establishment of the Republic of Liberia, William Lloyd Garrison, the Grimke Sisters, the role of black abolitionists, Frederick Douglass, Sojourner Truth, the role of Harriet Tubman in the Underground Railroad, differing opinions over abolitionism, opposition to abolition in the North, and the Southern reaction to the Abolitionist Movement. 
  • Students will complete a reading exercise analyzing the differing views held by abolitionists and the different tactics used by them in their movement against the institution of slavery.
  • Students will create a freedom quilt by sketching landmarks and physical features in squares as directions for escaped slaves to follow as they journey along the Underground Railroad to freedom in the North.
  • Learning Log # 10 Write directions for a Kindergartner to get from your class to the gym. If you were writing these directions for an adult, would they be different? Which is easier for you: writing directions, drawing a map, or telling someone how to get from one place to another?
  • On p. 424 in the text, students will copy and answer question 2-5.
Wednesday 2/20/19 (Day 3 of Lesson)
  • Students will respond to a released iLEAP question describing how most abolitionists, both black and white, in the 1830's supported the immediate emancipation of all slaves.
  • Students will view a clip on Discovery Education tracing the establishment of the American Colonization Society in 1817 and its attempts to return freed slaves to the African continent.
  • Students will define the words abolitionist and Underground Railroad.
  • Students will read pp. 418-424 in Chapter 14 "Age of Reform".
  • Students will construct/discuss notes 11-20 on the assigned reading covering the early efforts to end slavery, the Abolitionist Movement, the American Colonization Society and the establishment of the Republic of Liberia, William Lloyd Garrison, the Grimke Sisters, the role of black abolitionists, Frederick Douglass, Sojourner Truth, the role of Harriet Tubman in the Underground Railroad, differing opinions over abolitionism, opposition to abolition in the North, and the Southern reaction to the Abolitionist Movement. 
  • Students will complete a reading exercise analyzing the differing views held by abolitionists and the different tactics used by them in their movement against the institution of slavery.
  • Students will create a freedom quilt by sketching landmarks and physical features in squares as directions for escaped slaves to follow as they journey along the Underground Railroad to freedom in the North.
  • Learning Log # 10 Write directions for a Kindergartner to get from your class to the gym. If you were writing these directions for an adult, would they be different? Which is easier for you: writing directions, drawing a map, or telling someone how to get from one place to another?
  • On p. 424 in the text, students will copy and answer question 2-5.
Thursday 2/21/19 (Day 1 of Lesson)
  • Students will respond to a released iLEAP question identifying how lecturing in public assemblies was considered a controversial activity for women.
  • Students will view a clip on Brain Pop summarizing women's suffrage throughout American history from the Early Colonial Period to the Ratification of the 19th Amendment in 1920.
  • Students will define the words coeducation and suffrage.
  • Students will read pp. 425-428 in Chapter 14 "Age of Reform".
  • Students will construct/discuss notes 21-30 on the assigned reading covering women and social reform, the roles of Lucretia Mott and Elizabeth Cady Stanton, the Seneca Falls Convention, the support for women's suffrage, the Women's Rights Movement, the role of Susan B. Anthony,  the concept of coeducation, progress by American women in society, the establishment of female colleges and universities, gains in the laws regarding marriage and family, and the accomplishments of women breaking barriers in traditional male careers.
  • Students will complete a reading exercise evaluating how Dorothea Dix's compassion for the mentally ill led to changes in the way these people were treated by society.
  • Students will complete a reading exercise analyzing the strength and determination suffragettes exhibited to defend women's rights and the right to vote.
  • Learning Log # 11 In your opinion, why hasn’t a woman been elected President of the United States of America? What characteristics do many women have that would make them good leaders? What might keep some women from running for political office?
  • On p. 428 in the text, students will copy and answer question 2-5.
Friday 2/22/19 (Day 2 of Lesson)
  • Students will respond to a released iLEAP question identifying how lecturing in public assemblies was considered a controversial activity for women.
  • Students will view a clip on Brain Pop summarizing women's suffrage throughout American history from the Early Colonial Period to the Ratification of the 19th Amendment in 1920.
  • Students will define the words coeducation and suffrage.
  • Students will read pp. 425-428 in Chapter 14 "Age of Reform".
  • Students will construct/discuss notes 21-30 on the assigned reading covering women and social reform, the roles of Lucretia Mott and Elizabeth Cady Stanton, the Seneca Falls Convention, the support for women's suffrage, the Women's Rights Movement, the role of Susan B. Anthony,  the concept of coeducation, progress by American women in society, the establishment of female colleges and universities, gains in the laws regarding marriage and family, and the accomplishments of women breaking barriers in traditional male careers.
  • Students will complete a reading exercise evaluating how Dorothea Dix's compassion for the mentally ill led to changes in the way these people were treated by society.
  • Students will complete a reading exercise analyzing the strength and determination suffragettes exhibited to defend women's rights and the right to vote.
  • Learning Log # 11 In your opinion, why hasn’t a woman been elected President of the United States of America? What characteristics do many women have that would make them good leaders? What might keep some women from running for political office?
  • On p. 428 in the text, students will copy and answer question 2-5.