The Baylor Brothers in the War Between the States


It is well that war is so terrible; else we should grow too fond of it.
General Robert E. Lee

War is at best barbarism...Its glory is all moonshine. It is only those who have neither fired a shot, nor heard the shrieks and groans of the wounded who cry aloud for blood, more vengeance, more desolation.
General William T. Sherman

If I were to speak of war, it would not be to show the glories of conquering armies but the mischief and misery they strew in their tracks; and how, while they marched on with tread of iron and plumes proudly tossing the breeze, some one must follow closely in their steps, crouching to the earth, toiling in the rain and darkness,
shelterless themselves, with no thought of pride or glory, fame or praise, or reward; hearts breaking with pity, faces bathed in tears and hands in blood. This is the side which history never shows.
Clara Barton


This is a story of Wainwright F. Baylor, his brother Lewis S. Baylor and their brother-in-law Frederick Taylor and their service in the Civil War. While writing this, it occurred to me that much of what we know of our ancestors comes from war records. Certainly this narrative would be much shorter and, to me, much less interesting if these Civil War records did not exist.

Wainwright, Lewis and Frederick did not make a giant mark on the world. They are are not the subject of  history books, they are remembered by few, no one has made a movie of their lives.  They were ordinary men, volunteering to do service to the country they lived in. They lived their lives as most of us will -- doing it one day at a time and trying to do the best with what they had.

You will find at the end of this story the application for a Civil War pension filed by Wainwright's widow Lavinia in 1917 This long delay was probably due to the rules governing Confederate pensions. Up until 1915, a widow or soldier had to supply the exact date of enlistment in an application for a pension. Lavinia may not have remembered all the facts she needed. Following 1915, application could be made listing a name only. The pensions were  paid by the state where the applicant lived at the time regardless of where they served in the war.

Wainwright and Lewis Baylor are the Great Uncles of Bonnie Jane Baylor Garmon. Frederick Taylor married Catherine Baylor, a sister of Wainwright and Lewis.

Jim Garmon, January 2015



The War Between the States

On December 20, 1860, South Carolina became the first state to secede from the Union. As more states seceded, a war between the United States and the Confederate States seemed inevitable, and indeed it was. The War Between the States began in April of the following year with the bombardment of Fort Sumter in Charleston harbor by the Confederates.

Along with many others, Wainwright F. Baylor, his brother Lewis E. Baylor, and their brother-in-law Frederick Joseph Taylor enlisted in the Confederate States Army. Wainwright left behind a young wife Lavinia; Lewis leaves his wife Sophia, 20 years old, and their three young children; Frederick leaves his wife Catherine and four children behind.

The three men enlisted in the Confederate Army on January 20, 1862 at South Santee, South Carolina. Enlisted by Capt. Thomas Pinckney, they join his Company A, St. James Mounted Riflemen, Manigualt's Battalion, South Carolina Volunteers for "Duration of the War." This Company was one of many Independent Companies formed by well-to-do men with former or current military experience.

Captain Thomas Pinckney, the commander of Company A, is described in Mauriel Phillips Joslyn's book "Captives Immortal":

"Captain Thomas Pinckney ... had been a delicate youth. Educated at the University of Virginia, he also attended the Medical College of South Carolina, graduating in the class of 1849. He was commissioned Captain when the war began, raising his own company of cavalry, and carrying the sword his father had carried in the War of 1812."


Company A Muster Roll, January -- February 1862

W. Baylor is listed as Absent, on recruiting service from Feb. 27 -- March 5

Lewis Baylor is Present

F. Taylor is Absent, on Picket duty


Company A Muster Roll, March -- April, 1862

W. Baylor listed as Present. For use of horse $24.00

Lewis Present. Paid for use of horse -- $24.00

F. Taylor Present.  Paid for use of horse -- $24.00


Company A Muster Roll, May -- June 1862

W. Baylor is Present

Lewis Baylor Absent, on detached duty.


Company A, St. James Mounted Riflemen and other Independent Companies formed earlier in the war are consolidated and Frederick, Wainwright and Lewis are attached to Company D, Stokes Battalion.

The Battalion Commander, Major William Stokes, served in the South Carolina State Militia before the Civil War as a Captain, commanding a company of Cavalry. When the Civil War broke out, he entered the Confederate Army with the same rank. On May 6th he was promoted to Major.

As Wainwright, Lewis and Frederick joined the unit, the Battalion was in camp near Grahamville in Pickins County, part of the force gathered to protect the Charleston-Savannah Railway. The Union Army had yet to make a successful entry into South Carolina but in late May, the Union soldiers attack Old Pocotaligo, trying to cut the railroad lines.

From Major Stokes letters, May 31, 1862:

" I will give you an account of our fight at Pocotaligo. ... I received orders at one o'clock to move on Pocotaligo and was in force under some live oak that were there ... Our pickets and the yankees were then within 400 yards and Col. Walker had stopped pursuing on account of the darkness of the night. It was then and there that we could realize [what] war and battles were."


Company Muster Roll, July -- August, 1862.

W. Baylor Absent, on sick furlough at St. Johns Parish from August 16 to 31.

Lewis Baylor Absent, on detached duty to St. Johns Parish from August 19 to August 31.

F. Taylor is listed as Present.


The Battalion moves to Camp Jackson, on the May River about two miles above Bluffton, South Carolina.

The summer of 1862 is quiet for the Battalion, most of the activity consisting of occasional skirmishes between the Confederate pickets and Union patrols. Even Major Stokes gets a chance to fire at the enemy, as he reports in his diary:

July 31, 1862. "I shot at my first yankee today about 5 to 600 yds. across the river at Buckingham Ferry ... The first crack I took they ran like good fellows..."


Company Muster Roll, September -- October, 1862.

W. Baylor Present.

Lewis Baylor Present.

F. Taylor is listed as Absent, on picket duty on Bulls Bay.  [The present day Bulls Bay is north of Charleston, an unlikely distance for pickets from Company D, located nearly 100 miles south of Charleston. There is, however, a Bulls Creek nearby their camp]


Old Pocotaligo is again attacked by the Union Army on 22 of October in an effort to sever the railroad and bridges of the Charleston and Savannah line.

From Major Stokes diary, October 23, 1862:

"We beat them back five to one. We lost about 60 killed and wounded and the Y[ankees] about 2 or 3 hundred."

After this failed attack, the Union Army made no other attempts during 1862 to enter the coastal mainland of South Carolina.


Company Muster Roll, November -- December, 1862.

W. Baylor Present.

Lewis Baylor Present.

Frederick Taylor Present.


The Battalion moves to Camp Pritchard, the home of Dr. Pritchard. Colonel Stokes says in a letter to his wife: "I am almost as comfortably situated as if I were at home."

Almost certainly Wainwright, Lewis, Frederick and their fellow soldiers shared some of the comfort of the assignment. The picket duty performed by the Battalion was easier and far safer than the duties of common soldier in the Infantry.

After months of negotiations, letter writing and political string pulling, the 4th South Carolina Cavalry Regiment is formed, consisting of 10 Companies, around 1000 men. Captain Pinckney's Company  is one of these companies.

Captain Benjamin Huger Rutledge of the Charleston Light Hussars is promoted to Colonel and becomes the Regimental Commander. Major Stokes is promoted to Lieutenant Colonel and made second-in-command.

Although second-in-command, Colonel Stokes seems to have led the Regiment during most of the engagements with the enemy, for Colonel Rutledge is frequently absent. In his diary, Colonel Stokes makes note of these absences, often with a bit of sarcasm.

As 1862 ends, Frederick, Wainwright and Lewis remain together, all three in Company D, 4th South Carolina Cavalry.


Company Muster Roll, January -- February, 1863.

W. Baylor Present.

Lewis Baylor is Present.

F. Taylor is  Present.


As the Union Army continued its effort to destroy the bridges and the railway from Charleston to Savannah, the 4th South Carolina Cavalry was counted on to assist in beating back the expected assault. The Battalion furnishes pickets to collect information on the buildup of the Union fleet along the coast.

From Col. Stokes letters,

January 25, 1863:

"All is quiet down here. The Union fleet at Hilton Head is 4 steam frigates, 4 gun boats, and 40 transports"

February 3, 1863:

"There has come into Port Royal since last Sunday 18 gun boats, 4 steam Frigates, and 31 transports."

February 6, 1863:

"The fleet is daily increasing. It now numbers 70 vessels."

February 24, 1863:

"The enemy fleet has increased some 40 vessels within the past 24 hours. They now have 127 vessels, 20 of which are gun boats and 20 large steamers with only 2 guns the remainder transports."



Company Muster Roll, March -- April, 1863

W. Baylor Absent, on furlough for 60 days from April 25, 1863.

Lewis Baylor Present.



April 1 -- May 31, 1863

W. Baylor Appears on a Register of Payment on Descriptive List.


March 22, 1863:

"The fleet this evening numbers 135 vessels in all..."

Col. Stokes continues to send pickets to the coast to keep track on the Union fleet, reporting by telegraph to his commander, Col. Walker. Activity of the Union Army in the 4th Cavalry area seems limited to raids, burning houses and barns before being beaten back to the protection of their ships.


Company Muster Roll, May -- June, 1863.

W. Baylor Absent, Sick furlough from 8 June to 28 July.

Lewis Baylor Present.  Paid for use of horse $24.40.

F. Taylor is Present. Paid for use of horse $24.40.


After a short stay at McPhersonville, Col. Stokes moves his camp to Green Pond.

June 18, 1863:

"I arrived here about 2 PM. My Head Quarters will be within two hundred yards of the Station."


Company Muster Roll, July -- August, 1863

Wainwright is Absent, detailed to get a horse, August 26 -- September 9.

Lewis Baylor is Present.

F. Taylor is Present.


During July and August Colonel Stokes and his troops can hear the almost constant sound of cannon fire coming from Charleston. Activity continues to be very light in their area.


Company Muster Roll, September -- October, 1863

Wainwright is Absent, surgeons certificate from 15 October for 15 days. Paid for use of horse $24.40.

F. Taylor is  Present.  Paid $24.40 for use of horse.

Lewis Baylor is Present. For use of horse $24.40


Both Wainwright and his brother Lewis were absent without leave from the 18th of December to January 29th. They probably returned to their families for the Christmas holidays. Upon returning to their unit they are held in the garrison guard tent until March 13,  then both were transferred to Company I, 23rd Infantry, commanded by Captain Henry H. Lesesne. The easy job they had in the cavalry was gone, now it was the common foot soldier's life they would lead.


Company Muster Roll, November -- December, 1863

Wainwright is Absent without Leave from 18 December, Dismounted.

Lewis is Absent. Absent without Leave from December 18. Dismounted.

F. Taylor is Present. Paid $24.40 for use of horse.


Company Muster Roll, January -- February, 1864.

Wainwright is Dismounted, in Guard Tent. Absent without Leave from 18 December to January 29.

Lewis is Present, Dismounted in Garrison Guard Tent. Absent without Leave from December 18 to 29 January.

Frederick Taylor is Present.


           Company Muster Roll, March -- August 31, 1864.

Wainwright is transferred to Capt. Lesesne’s Company, 23rd Regiment SC Volunteer Infantry.

Lewis is transferred to Capt. Lesesne’s Company, 23rd Regiment SC Volunteer Infantry.

Fred Taylor is Present.


We will follow Wainwright and Lewis in their new assignment to the Infantry through the records of the National Archives, returning to Frederick later.


Company I, 23rd Infantry Muster Roll, February 29 -- June 30, 1864

Wainwright Present. Transferred by exchange from Company D, 4th Regiment SCCV. March 13, 1864.

Lewis is Present. Transferred by exchange from Company D, 4th Regiment SCCV. March 13, 1864.


May 24, 1864

Special Requisition (No. 40) For: Capt. Lesesne Company I, 23rd SCV One pair of shoes. I certify that the above requisition is correct; and the article specified are absolutely requisite for the public service, rendered so by the following circumstances: That the soldier is barefoot and entitled to shoes by Army regulations. Signed by: 2nd Lt. H. D. Wells, Company I.

Quartermaster, C. S. Army will issue the article specified in the above requisition.

Signed: H. L. Bendow, Col., Commanding.

Received at Wilmington, N. C., the 24th of May, 1864 of Capt. I. S. Richardson, A Quartermaster, C. S. Army: One pair shoes in full of the above requisition.

Signed: L. Bayler

July 20, 1864, Special Requisition (No. 40)

For L. Bailer Co I. 23rd S.C.V.

One Cotton Shirt. I certify that the above requisition is correct; and the articles specified are absolutely requisite for the public service, rendered so by the following circumstances: A scarcity of under Clothing.

Signed by S.P. Wells Corp. of Co I. 23rd S.C.V.

Capt. J. L.. Richardson Quartermaster, C. S. Army, will issue the articles specified in the above Requisition.

Signed by S.P. Wells.

Received at: In the field the 20th day of July 1864 of Capt. J. L.. Richardson Quartermaster, C. S. Army ,

One Cotton Shirt in the full Requisition.

Sign by L. E. Bayler


Lewis appears on a morning report of Jackson Hospital, Richmond, Va. Sept. 4 and 30, 1864. Admitted Sept. 4, 1864. Disease Fever and Diarrhea.

Returned to duty Sept. 30, 1864.

Appears on the Register of Jackson Hospital, Richmond Va.

Diagnosis -- Fever and Diarrhea.

Admitted Sept. 4, 1864.

Returned to duty September 30, 1864.


Company Muster Roll, July 1 -- October 31, 1864

Wainwright Absent, Sick.

Lewis is Present, Sick.

Lewis appears on a Receipt Roll for clothing, Richmond, Va.

Date of Issue September 25, 1864.


Wainwright -- Jackson Hospital, Richmond, Virginia.

Admitted October 10, 1864. Disease -- Rheumatism.

Jackson Hospital, Richmond, Virginia.

Admitted October 10, 1864. Evans Brigade.

Returned to duty November 26, 1864.


Wainwright -- Jackson Hospital, Richmond, Virginia.

Receipt Roll for Clothing, November 17, 1864.


Wainwright -- Jackson Hospital, Richmond, Virginia.

Receipt Roll for Clothing, November 22, 1864.


Wainwright -- Jackson Hospital, Richmond, Virginia. November 26, 1864.

Admitted October 10, 1864.

Returned to duty November 26, 1864.


Company Muster Roll, November -- December 1864

Wainwright Present.

Lewis Baylor is Present.

Company Muster Roll, January -- February, 1865

Wainwright Present.

Lewis Baylor is Present.


Wainwright and his brother Lewis Baylor are captured March 25, 1865 near Petersburg, Virginia and taken to Point Lookout, Maryland as prisoners of war.


Wainwright and Lewis are listed as Prisoner of War, Point Lookout, Md.:

Arrival City Point, Va. March 28, 1865.

Captured near Petersburg March 25, 1865.

Released June 24, 1865. (Point Lookout, Md., Register 2, Page 52)


Wainwright signed the Oath of Allegiance and was released from Point Lookout June 24, 1865.

Lewis signed the Oath of Allegiance and was released from Point Lookout June 24, 1865. He is listed as "complection light, hair light eyes hazel, height 5 ft 10 in".

"Paroles of prisoners of war were last used during the American Civil War. The romantic nature of warfare existed in the minds of all men. With this romantic concept came the idea of personal honor. A person's word of honor given was a sacred trust that could not be broken, except at the peril of being ostracized by ones' fellow man." (Civil War Prisons and Escapes - A Day by Day Chronicles, Robert E. Denney, Sterling Publishers Co. Inc., New York 1993)

The Oath stated:

" I do solemnly swear, in the presence of Almighty God, that I will henceforth faithfully support, protect and defend the Constitution of the United States, and the Union of States thereunder; and that I will in like manner abide by and faithfully support all acts of Congress passed during the existing rebellion reference to slaves, so long and so far not repealed, modified or help void by Congress, or by decision of the Supreme Court; and that I will in like manner abide by and faithfully support all proclamations of the President made during the existing rebellion, having reference to slaves, so long and so far as not modified or declared void by the decision of the Supreme Court,---So help me God; and I give my solemn parole of honor (to be enforced according to military law,) that I will hold no correspondence with, or afford any aid or comfort to any enemies or opposers of the United States, save as an act of humanity, to administer to the necessity of individuals, who are in sickness or distress, and I solemnly declare that this Oath and Parole is taken and given freely and willingly, without any mental reservation or evasion whatever, and with full intention to keep the same.



Signing the Oath of Allegiance at Point Lookout



Frederick Taylor

After Wainwright and Lewis were transferred to the Infantry for being Absent without Leave, Frederick Taylor remained with Company D, 4th SC Cavalry. We continue with his story.

Military activity is very light. Colonel Stokes says in a letter to his wife after hearing he may soon be ordered to move camp:

March 10, 1864: "...I do not like so much shifting around. It puts an end to my garden and my mess [eating] arrangements... I will have to send my sow and pigs home, too."


F. Taylor appears on a Receipt Roll for clothing. Date of issue March -- June 1864.

F. Taylor appears on a Receipt Roll for clothing, for 2 Qtr, 1864. Date of issue: April 19, 1864.


The threat to the Charleston-Savannah railway seems to have lessened and the need for troops to the south increased, for the 4th South Carolina Cavalry is ordered to move to Virginia. On the first day of May, 1864 they begin their march, on foot, leading their horses. Their route takes them through Columbia, Camden, South Carolina and Charlotte, Salisbury, and Greensboro, North Carolina. By May 24, they have passed through Richmond, and are encamped about four miles north of the city.

From Stokes letters:

"May 29. Yesterday about four miles from here ... we had for about three or four hours we had a very severe engagement with the advance army of General Grant, and by the blessings of God alone I am safe... I had in action about three hundred exclusive of horse handlers and as far as I can tell there are about 125 killed, wounded and missing and among them are some of our most valuable and gallant officers"

Captain Thomas Pinckney, the company commander of Frederick’s company, is captured. He was sent as a prisoner of war to Point Lookout, Maryland, then to Fort Delaware, Delaware.

May 30, 1864. The Regiment is again in battle, losing 54 men killed, captured or missing. Col. Stokes:

"We have lost seriously in officers"

For the next few weeks, the Regiment sees battle almost daily.

July 7, 1864. Colonel Stokes writes from the Huguenot Hospital, apparently sick or wounded:

"When I left the command the other day we had only 55 men present. Some 75 had been sent to Richmond to have their horses shod and all the others are at reserve camp, so you can see that Colonel Rutledge and I have a small command -- two field officers to 55 men"


September -- October, 1864. F. Taylor is Present.


This is the last listing of Frederick Joseph Taylor on file with the National Archives. There may be a good reason for this -- read on.

For the remainder of 1864 the 4th Cavalry in engaged in heavy fighting. By the end of the year, the Regiment is that in name only.

Colonel Stokes was granted a 21 day furlough by General Robert E. Lee. He overstays the furlough by about three weeks and placed under arrest. While he was on leave, his regiment was ordered back to South Carolina.

February 2, 1865. Colonel Stokes is in camp near Columbia, South Carolina.

February 24, 1865. The 4th Cavalry is back in North Carolina, near Charlotte. Through the next few weeks, they see more battle, further reducing the Regiment.

March 11, 1865. Thomasville, North Carolina.

March 21, 1865. Raleigh.

March 29, 1865. Wayne County, North Carolina

Captain Thomas Pinckney, Commander of Frederick’s company, rejoined the 4th South Carolina in April 1865, after hearing that all paroled prisoners were declared exchanged. He arrived poorly mounted on the only horse he could obtain, for which he paid the dear sum of $2,700.00. His old company numbered only 10 men, and it was one of the most fit for duty under command of the Brigade commander Wade Hampton. In one of the last engagements of which the 4th took part, Pinckney’s mount fell with him, breaking its riders leg, thus ending his military career in the Confederate army once and for all.

April 1, 1865. The Confederacy is coming to an end. Colonel Stokes hears that the units are supposed to start returning to South Carolina to regroup and return to the war. "I do not care for my Regiment to go at all for only thirty days"

April 2, 1865. Colonel Stokes:

"I had a fine shad for breakfast this morning..."

From Colonel Stokes service record:

"On April 10th, Sherman commenced to move from Goldsboro up through North Carolina along the Central railroad, and the command skirmished daily with his advance until we passed through Raleigh, on Saturday, the 15th of April, when near Hillsboro a flag of truce came up from the enemy, which I met. It was the beginning of negotiations between Generals Johnstone and Sherman, which eventually ended in the surrender of Johnstone’s Army. Hearing on the evening of the 26th of April that the surrender would take place the following day, and not desiring to go through the formality of surrendering the Regiment which I commanded, I ordered the camp be struck at 8:30 P.M. and marched toward Asheboro, N.C. Reached Asheboro at 8:30 P.M. on April 27th. At this place I disbanded the Regiment and sent them home."

According to his service record, Stokes himself followed later, bringing with him the headquarters wagon containing the Regiment’s records; however, he awakened one morning to discover that the teamsters and mules that pulled it had disappeared during the night. The personal records, the fighting heart of the 4th South Carolina Cavalry, were in the wagon. Being unable to move the wagon alone and not wishing to abandon it to scavengers who might come upon it and despoil the only remnants of the Regiment (except what lay in the memories of the survivors), he set fire to it. The burning of the records may explain the absence of records for Frederick during the last few month of service.

After the War

Benjamin Huger Rutledge returns to his law practice in Berkeley County, and is later joined in the practice by his son, also named Benjamin Huger Rutledge. He and his son are later family lawyers of Wainwright Baylor and his wife Lavinia, managing Lavinia’s inheritance from her father. His son will, in 1917, write a letter supporting Wainwright Baylor’s wife in her efforts to get a pension for her husbands service in the Civil War.

William Stokes returns to South Carolina, enters politics and is elected to the first State Legislature assembled after the war. He takes an active part in the campaign to elect his former Brigade commander, Wade Hampton, to the Governorship. After Hampton is elected, William Stokes is promoted to Brigadier General.

Thomas Pinckney. Upon arriving back at his rice plantation outside Charleston, Pinckney found "El Dorado" vandalized and inhabited by his former servants. His beautiful library was ransacked, and books littered the yard. Although heart-broken, he started anew, first by persuading federal authorities to aid him in reclaiming his property. Then he and a friend hunted game and sold meat on the streets of Charleston forty-two miles away, to make a living. After years of adversity, he finally recovered his rice plantation, and became a prominent planter. Uninterested in political attentions for himself despite the urging of others, he worked to get Wade Hampton elected governor of South Carolina, and put his energy into benefiting his state.

Wainwright Baylor returns to Lavinia. They have a second son, Allen Benjamin Baylor, born in 1874, and a third son, Edmund S., birthdate unknown.  Some records say that Wainwright died on Independence Day, July 4, 1900, but Lavinia states in her pension application in 1917 that he died on the third of July, 1897.

Lewis Baylor returns home, moves to Williamsburg County, South Carolina and resumes farming and raises a large family.

Frederick Joseph Taylor is dead. Family lore presented by his descendant Murray Taylor says he died on the way home at the end of the war, suffering from smallpox caught from a borrowed blanket. His body was shipped to Charleston, leaving his family to pay for transportation the  rest of the way home.


Epilog to "Baylors in the War Between the States"


I have tried to present a narrative that describes Wainwright, Lewis and Frederick’s experience during the Civil War by following the diary and letters of Lt. Col. Stokes, and through excerpts from a book describing Captain Pinckney’s capture and imprisonment in Fort Delaware. Through their stories we can begin to get a picture of the lives of the troops who served under them, the conditions they lived in, and the type of leaders they had.

Was Frederick one of the last 10 men remaining in Company D when Captain Pinckney returned just days before the end of the war? We may never know. Colonel Stokes destroyed all traces of Fredrick's recent records when he burned the wagons carrying the records of the 4th Cavalry.

A note of caution. Without supporting evidence, we cannot assume that any specific person was involved in any of the battles described above. We have no letters or diary from Wainwright, Lewis or Frederick, only the muster roll taken ever two months. The muster is generally accurate for that day only.

Frederick’s Company fought in many major battles during the last part of 1864 and early 1865. I have not tried to document these in detail. For those interested in knowing more, I highly recommend Lloyd Halliburton’s book that I used for all the letters from Stokes: "Saddle Soldiers. The Civil War Correspondence of General William Stokes of the 4th South Carolina Cavalry", Sandlapper Publishing Company, Inc., Orangeburg, South Carolina, ISBN: 0-87844-115-8. Excerpts used by permission of the author.

All the details above concerning Captain Pinckney are from Mauriel Joslyns’s book. For more details on Pinckney, his capture and imprisonment in Fort Delaware see: Immortal Captives, The Story of 600 Confederate Officers and the United States Prisoner of War Policy, by Mauriel Phillips Joslyn, published by White Mane Publishing, Shippensburg, PA, 17257-0152, ISBN: 0-942597-96-6. Excerpts used by permission of the author.


Civil War Pension Application

In 1917 Lavinia Ray Baylor, widow of Wainwright Baylor, filed a claim with the state of Florida for a Civil War pension. The records for this claim, 17 pages of letters, affidavits, form letters, notarized letters, etc., to and from Lavinia, the state of Florida and the War Department tell an interesting story of the lives of Lavinia and Wainwright.

Lavinia was unable to supply very much information on the enlistment of Wainwright, giving no exact unit or date of enlistment. The lack of knowledge of these facts is probably the reason she applied at such a late date. Up until 1915, a widow or soldier had to supply the exact date of enlistment in an application for a pension. Following 1915, application could be made listing a name only.

Lavinia's Widows Pension Claim:

"Under the act of 1915 State of Florida, County of Levy, on this 31 day of January, 1917, A.D. One Thousand Nine Hundred and 17, appeared personally before me, a notary public in and for the County and State aforesaid, Mrs. L. C. Baylor, a resident of Meredeth County of Levy, State of Florida, who being duly sworn according to law, makes the following declaration in order to obtain a pension under the provisions Chapter 6818, Laws of Florida, Approved June 4, 1915. That she is the widow of Wainright Baylor who enlisted under the name Wainright Baylor."

Unable to furnish the date of enlistment and the unit Wainwright served with, she left this blank on the application. Where asked if husband drew pension, she said "No, but made application, but died before same was completed."

She further states that:

"She was lawfully married to the said Wainright Baylor under the name of Lavenia Ray, in the county of Berkeley, South Carolina, on the 9th or 10th of February, 1858 or 1859 and she was not divorced from him and she has not remarried since his death, which occurred on the third of July, 1897 in the county of Berkeley, South Carolina."

And that:

"She is a resident of Levy County, Florida and has continuously resided in the state of Florida since November, 1906, that she does not own property, including real estate, personal property, mortgages or other collateral securities, stocks or bonds, in this or any other state to exceed in value the sum of $5000.00, that the following is a true and correct statement of all property owned by me in this or any other state" "No property except what clothing and little personal effects worth about $15.00. I receive an annuity of $40.00 from entailed property and live with my son who has a large family."

To establish the fact of Wainwright's death, the following two notarized letters were submitted:

"The State of South Carolina, Berkeley County. Personally appeared before me John W. Taylor of the aforesaid State and County, and made oath That he was acquainted with one Wainright Baylor, and affirms that the said Wainright Baylor died on the 4th day of July, 1900 at or near Chicora, S. C. in the aforesaid State and County. The affliction from which said Baylor died was Pronounced Catarrh of the brain. The said J. W. Taylor affirms that he helped bury the said Baylor. Given under my hand and seal this 17th day of May AD 1917. Isaac B. Marshe, Notary Public, South Carolina. Witness, F. A. Marshe, Signed J. W. Taylor"

"The State of South Carolina, Berkeley County. Personally appeared before me S. I. Williams and made oath That he was acquainted with Wainright Baylor, formerly of the aforesaid State and County, the said Wainright Baylor died at his home on the 4th day of July, 1900. I assisted in burying the body of Wainright who died of Catarrh of the brain.

Sworn to and subscribed to before me this the 18th day of May AD 1917.

Isaac B. Marshe, Notary Public, South Carolina.

Witness, F. A. Marshe

Signed S. I. Williams."

The signer of the first letter, J. W. Taylor, is John Wesley Taylor, son of Wainwright's sister Catherine. The signer of the second letter, S. I. William’s, is Seaborne Isaac Williams, son-in-law of Wainwright's sister Catherine.

To show that she was married to Wainwright, she submits the following:

"The State of South Carolina County of Charleston Personally appeared before me, a notary Public for the State of South Carolina, Benjamin H. Rutledge, who being duly sworn, says that he has known Lavinia C. Baylor, the widow of Wainright F. Baylor for thirty (30) years; that his father and deponent attended to the affairs of the family ever since the war; that the deponents father was the Colonel of the Fourth South Carolina Cavalry Regiment and told deponent that Baylor was one of his troopers and was a first rate soldier, belonging to the Company of Captain Thomas Pinckney, a part of the Regiment. That deponent has examined the records of the County of Charleston and finds it as follows in the Probate office Will Book 1, Page 341, Will of William Ray dates November 16, 1843, Proved November 29, 1843, that the testator in and by said will devised and bequeathed "The rest of my property to my daughter Lavinia" and appoints his brother Thomas Way [Ray] who qualified. That deponent finds upon record in the office of the register of Mesne Conveyance of Charleston County in Book Y-13, page 473, the following, to wit; a deed of Tupper Master to Thomas W. Easterling, Trustee for WAINRIGHT F. BAYLOR and LAVINIA BAYLOR his wife, dated September 1st, 1858, that the deed recites as follows Whereas THOMAS WAY [Ray] Executor of WILLIAM RAY on the 6th of March exhibited his bill in the court of Chancery against WAINRIGHT F. BAYLOR and LAVINIA BAYLOR his wife, wherein he set forth the will of WILLIAM RAY as Testator, that the said LAVINIA was the daughter and only child of Testator and Legatee of the residue of his estate, and was a minor and had married with WAINRIGHT F. BAYLOR, and then conveys all the residue and reminder of the estate belonging to his Testator to Easterling upon trusts of no import in this connection, the deed itself being entered in the records as a "marriage settlement under a decree in Chancery". That THOMAS WAY [Ray] the executor was the uncle of LAVINIA BAYLOR and in his own Bill in Equity recites that she married WILLIAM (sic) F. BAYLOR. That thereafter, to wit; in the year 1890 or thereabouts, deponent and his father then being partners, filed a bill in the court of Equity for Charleston County for the purpose of appointing a new Trustee in the place of Easterling, deceased, and in said bill it alleged that WAINRIGHT F. BAYLOR and LIVINIA were husband and wife, and the fact was so found by the Master. That deponent of his knowledge that WAINRIGHT and LIVINIA were husband and wife under the laws of South Carolina then being that marriage was a civil contract. That if a man and woman agree to become man and wife and in accordance with such agreement live together and are recognized and acknowledge as man and wife, that constitutes a valid marriage- and deponent knows that WAINRIGHT F. BAYLOR and LIVINIA so agreed and so lived together and acknowledge to this deponent they were man and wife. signed Benjamin H. Rutledge

SWORN to before me this 17th) day of March A.D. 1917) Simon Hyde, Notary public for South Carolina"

This deposition is signed by Benjamin Huger Rutledge, a distinguished lawyer and prominent citizen of Charleston, South Carolina. He is the son of Benjamin Huger Rutledge, who was also a lawyer, delegate to the Sessions Convention and one of the signers of the Ordinance of Secession, was Captain of the Charleston Light Dragoons and an officer in the Confederate Army, Colonel 4th South Carolina Cavalry Regiment, fought all through the war. He was prominent in political affairs in South Carolina during the reconstruction period. He served in the State Legislature, was much in demand as an orator, and made numerous addresses and political speeches.

Lavinia needs proof that Wainwright served in the C. S. A., furnishing the following Affidavit to confirm his service:

"Affidavit to be made by a Comrade

State of South Carolina County of Charleston.

Before me, a Notary Public, in and for the State and County aforesaid, personally came L. P. McAllen of McCallauville(?), County of Charleston, State of South Carolina, who, being duly sworn according to law, declares that he is the identical person who enlisted at McCallauville(?) in the State of South Carolina on the ____ day of 1861 in Company Gaillards Battery Regiment of the State of South Carolina, which organization was regularly mustered into the service of the Confederate States of America; that he knows of his own personal knowledge that Wainright F. Baylor ... (The blocks requesting information about Wainwright's unit are blank). The block labeled "Here state whether the soldier was transferred to another organization, or not, and if captured or imprisoned state when and where" says "I think possibly he might have been captured." "I know personally of the above stated service because I served with him in same Regiment (Following unit and Company blank) of the State of South Carolina and was HONORABLY discharged at Arthe(?) Johnsons Army, in the State of North Carolina on the ___ day of April, 1864 by reason of end of "war", and I did not desert the Confederate Service nor that the Oath of Allegiance to the United States before the close of the war.

Signed L. P. McClellan, late of Company Gaillards Battery, South Carolina Regiment.

Sworn and subscribed before me this 7th day of December, 1916, and I hereby certify that the above declaration was fully made known Affiant before swearing, and that I have no interest, direct or indirect, in the pension claim sought to be established by this declaration.

J. H. Graham, Notary Public for South Carolina."


"Affidavit to be made by a Comrade

State of South Carolina County of Charleston

Before me, a Notary Public, in and for the State and County aforesaid, personally came Henry Gaskins of McCalleuville(?) in the State of South Carolina in 1861, in Company Pinckneys Company Regiment of the State of South Carolina, which organization was legally mustered into the service of Confederate States of America; that he know of his own personal knowledge that Wainright F. Baylor enlisted in Company Capt. Pinckney Company Regiment of the State of South Carolina. (Left blank are the details of Wainwright's service) "I think possibly he may have been captured." "I know personally of the above stated service, because I served with him in Company Pinckney's Company Regiment of the State of South Carolina and was HONORABLY DISCHARGED at Manning in the State of South Carolina February, 1864, by reason of end of war, and I did not desert the Confederate States service nor take the oath of allegiance to the United States before the close of the war.

Signed Henry (X his Mark) Gaskins, late of Company Pinckneys, S. C. Regiment.

Sworn and subscribed before me on this 9th day of December 1916 and I hearby certify that the above declaration was fully made known to the Affiant before swearing, and that I have no interest, direct or in direct, in the pension claim sought to be established by this declaration.

Signed J. H. Graham, Notary Public for South Carolina.

Lavinia supplies several other papers, such as: "We the undersigned, Citizens of the County of Levy in the State of Florida, respectfully ask the State Pension Department of the State to place the name of Mrs. L. C. Baylor on the pension rolls. We know her to be worthy from her statements and what knowledge we have of her personally."

The following document is signed by 96 people of the County of Levy:

"Report of County Commissioners. We, the undersigned, County Commissioners in and for the County of Levy, Florida, do hereby report that a meeting of the board of the County Commissioners held this day, the foregoing application of Mrs. L. C. Baylor, for a pension under the laws of Florida, was investigated by us; that we are satisfied that the applicant does not own property to exceed the value of 5.000 dollars and that the representation made in the petition and affidavits are true and that a pension should be granted to the applicant."

Signed by five County Commissioners February 6, 1917.

On April 20, 1917, the War Department responds the Lavinia's application.

"Respectfully returned to the Department of Pensions, Tallahassee, Fla. with the information that no records have been found in the Confederate Archives of this Department pertaining to any such organization as the one mentioned within. Furthermore, as exhaustive a search of the records as it is practicable to make from the data furnished has resulted in failure to find any information concerning the service, capture, or parole of a man of the name and organization in question"

However, on the 28th of April, 1917, the War Department sends this message to the Florida Pension Department:

"Respectfully returned to Department of Pensions, Tallahassee, Fla. with the information that W. Baylor (not found as Wainright F. Baylor) Priv. Co. D (Thomas Pinckney, Capt) 4th Regt. (Rutledge) S. C. Cav., CSA. Enlisted January 20, 1862 and was transferred March 13, 1864 to Co. I, 23 Regt S. C. Inf, CSA and appears on roll of that company for Feb. 20, 1865 (Last on file) Present. Union Prisoner Records show Wainwright Baylor, Pvt, Co I, 23 Regt. S. C., captured March 25, near Petersburg and was released on oath of Allegiance, June 24, 1865 at Point Lookout, Maryland."

Finally, Lavinia receives:

"Claim for Pension, by Mrs. L. C. Baylor of Meredith Post Office of Levy County, application number 20925, pensioner number 4362. Filed in the Pension Department April 17, 1917, approved and filed in the Comptrollers Office May 26, 1917, with pay from April 17, 1917 at the rate of $150.00 per Annum".

Signed Sinclair Wells, Secretary of the Board.


Lavinia died in 1923 in Bronson, Levy County, Florida, having collected the pension for about six years.