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Keel Toys Bears


keel toys bears
    bears
  • (of a person) Carry
  • (of a vehicle or boat) Convey (passengers or cargo)
  • (bear) an investor with a pessimistic market outlook; an investor who expects prices to fall and so sells now in order to buy later at a lower price
  • (bear) massive plantigrade carnivorous or omnivorous mammals with long shaggy coats and strong claws
  • Have or display as a visible mark or feature
  • have; "bear a resemblance"; "bear a signature"
    keel
  • The longitudinal structure along the centerline at the bottom of a vessel's hull, on which the rest of the hull is built, in some vessels extended downward as a blade or ridge to increase stability
  • A ridge along the breastbone of many birds to which the flight muscles are attached; the carina
  • a projection or ridge that suggests a keel
  • A prow-shaped pair of petals present in flowers of the pea family
  • stagger: walk as if unable to control one's movements; "The drunken man staggered into the room"
  • the median ridge on the breastbone of birds that fly
    toys
  • (toy) plaything: an artifact designed to be played with
  • A person treated by another as a source of pleasure or amusement rather than with due seriousness
  • (toy) dally: behave carelessly or indifferently; "Play about with a young girl's affection"
  • An object for a child to play with, typically a model or miniature replica of something
  • An object, esp. a gadget or machine, regarded as providing amusement for an adult
  • (toy) a nonfunctional replica of something else (frequently used as a modifier); "a toy stove"

Cleopatra's Needle, London
Cleopatra's Needle, London
Cleopatra's Needle is the popular name for each of three Ancient Egyptian obelisks re-erected in London, Paris, and New York City during the nineteenth century. The London and New York ones are a pair, while the Paris one comes from a different original site where its twin remains. Although the needles are genuine Ancient Egyptian obelisks, they are somewhat misnamed as they have no particular connection with Queen Cleopatra VII of Egypt, and were already over a thousand years old in her lifetime. The Paris "needle" was the first to be moved and re-erected, and the first to acquire the nickname. The London/Paris pair are made of red granite, stand about 21 metres (68 ft) high, weigh about 224 tons and are inscribed with Egyptian hieroglyphs. They were originally erected in the Egyptian city of Heliopolis on the orders of Thutmose III, around 1450 BC. The material of which they were cut is granite, brought from the quarries of Aswan, near the first cataract of the Nile. The inscriptions were added about 200 years later by Ramesses II to commemorate his military victories. The obelisks were moved to Alexandria and set up in the Caesareum — a temple built by Cleopatra in honor of Mark Antony — by the Romans in 12 BC, during the reign of Augustus, but were toppled some time later. This had the fortuitous effect of burying their faces and so preserving most of the hieroglyphs from the effects of weathering. The London needle is in the City of Westminster, on the Victoria Embankment near the Golden Jubilee Bridges. It is close to the Embankment underground station. It was presented to the United Kingdom in 1819 by the ruler of Egypt and Sudan Muhammad Ali, in commemoration of the victories of Lord Nelson at the Battle of the Nile and Sir Ralph Abercromby at the Battle of Alexandria in 1801. Although the British government welcomed the gesture, it declined to fund the expense of transporting it to London. The obelisk remained in Alexandria until 1877 when Sir William James Erasmus Wilson, a distinguished anatomist and dermatologist, sponsored its transportation to London at a cost of some ?10,000 (a very considerable sum in those days). It was dug out of the sand in which it had been buried for nearly 2,000 years and was encased in a great iron cylinder, 92 feet (28 m) long and 16 feet (4.9 m) in diameter, designed by the engineer John Dixon and dubbed Cleopatra, to be commanded by Captain Carter. It had a vertical stem and stern, a rudder, two bilge keels, a mast for balancing sails, and a deck house. This acted as a floating pontoon which was to be towed to London by the ship Olga, commanded by Captain Booth. London's Needle being erected, August 1878.The effort met with disaster on 14 October 1877, in a storm in the Bay of Biscay, when the Cleopatra began wildly rolling, and became untenable. The Olga sent out a rescue boat with six volunteers, but the boat capsized and all six crew were lost - named today on a bronze plaque attached to the foot of the needle's mounting stone. Captain Booth on the Olga eventually managed to get his ship next to the Cleopatra, to rescue Captain Carter and the five crew members aboard Cleopatra. Captain Booth reported the Cleopatra "abandoned and sinking," but instead she drifted in the Bay until found four days later by Spanish trawler boats, then rescued by the Glasgow steamer Fitzmaurice and taken to Ferrol in Spain for repairs. The Master of the Fitzmaurice lodged a salvage claim of ?5,000 which had to be settled before departure from Ferrol, which was negotiated down and settled for ?2,000. The William Watkins Ltd paddle tug Anglia under the command of Captain David Glue was then commissioned to tow the Cleopatra back to the Thames. On their arrival in the estuary, the school children of Gravesend were given the day off when she arrived on 21 January 1878. The obelisk was erected on the Victoria Embankment on 12 September 1878. On erection of the obelisk in 1878 a time capsule was concealed in the front part of the pedestal, it contained : A set of 12 photographs of the best looking English women of the day, a box of hairpins, a box of cigars, several tobacco pipes, a set of imperial weights, a baby's bottle, some children's toys, a shilling razor, a hydraulic jack and some samples of the cable used in erection, a 3' bronze model of the monument, a complete set of British coins, a rupee, a portrait of Queen Victoria, a written history of the strange tale of the transport of the monument, plans on vellum, a translation of the inscriptions, copies of the bible in several languages, a copy of Whitaker's Almanack, a Bradshaw Railway Guide, a map of London and copies of 10 daily newspapers. Cleopatra's Needle is flanked by two faux-Egyptian sphinxes cast from bronze that bear hieroglyphic inscriptions that say netjer nefer men-kheper-re di ankh (the good god, Thuthmosis III given life). These Sphinxes appear to be looking at the Needle rather than guard
Day 222 - Forbidden Fruit
Day 222 - Forbidden Fruit
For some time now Mrs PB's wanted to taste the forbidden fruit, but not the type that grows on trees! Yorkies, explicitly "not for girls", are one of the few types of chocolate she's never tried. Despite Mr Fox's reassurances, she was still a little anxious over the possible repercussions of eating the bulky bar. Bringing her fox along for moral support, she even treated him to a Toblerone for his pains. It soon transpired that she had ulterior motives though, when she asked him to try it first. Deciding not to remind her that he was in fact a boy, he obliged to keep her quiet. Satisfied, after waiting 5 minutes to check he didn't keel over, Mrs PB promptly ate her bar, before sending Mr Fox out to fetch her another to replace the chunk he ate.

keel toys bears
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