DECORATIVE METAL CEILING TILES - DECORATIVE METAL

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Decorative Metal Ceiling Tiles


decorative metal ceiling tiles
    ceiling tiles
  • (Ceiling Tile) Lightweight, sound absorbing material used to cover a ceiling area. Also called a ceiling panel.
    decorative
  • (decoratively) in a decorative manner; "used decoratively at Christmas"
  • Serving to make something look more attractive; ornamental
  • cosmetic: serving an esthetic rather than a useful purpose; "cosmetic fenders on cars"; "the buildings were utilitarian rather than decorative"
  • (decorativeness) an appearance that serves to decorate and make something more attractive
  • Relating to decoration
    metal
  • metallic: containing or made of or resembling or characteristic of a metal; "a metallic compound"; "metallic luster"; "the strange metallic note of the meadow lark, suggesting the clash of vibrant blades"- Ambrose Bierce
  • Broken stone for use in making roads
  • Gold and silver (as tinctures in blazoning)
  • A solid material that is typically hard, shiny, malleable, fusible, and ductile, with good electrical and thermal conductivity (e.g., iron, gold, silver, copper, and aluminum, and alloys such as brass and steel)
  • metallic element: any of several chemical elements that are usually shiny solids that conduct heat or electricity and can be formed into sheets etc.
  • cover with metal

Samuel Pell House
Samuel Pell House
This imposing residence, constructed around 1876, is a fine and well-preserved example of the freestanding Second Empire style frame houses that once proliferated in the rural areas of New York City but are now increasingly being altered or demolished. Built for oysterman Samuel Pell, it is significant reminder of the enormous wealth that the oyster trade brought to the maritime community of City Island in the nineteenth century. The Second Empire style is unusually well-represented on the island with thirteen surviving houses of which the Pell house is the grandest and best preserved. A five-bay-wide, three-story frame building, the Pell house is sheathed in its original clapboards and retains its historic two-over-two fenestration. It is richly embellished with heavy molded door and window surrounds, bracketed cornices, bay windows, and porches with turned posts and curved wood braces. The unusually well-preserved and elaborately-detailed mansard roof retains its original patterned polychrome slate shingles, pedimented dormers, and decorative metal flashing. Samuel Pell was a descendent of the Pell family that once owned this area of the Bronx. He and his children, who occupied this house until about 1900, were prominent members of the City Island community. In 1907, the house was sold to James Feeley, a partner in a wholesale lace curtain importing firm. In the late 1920s, the house passed to his son Edgar J. Feeley, a prominent attorney and part owner-officer of the New York Giants baseball team, who occupied the house until his death in 1972. It is currently being used as a residence. The Samuel Pell House occupies an L-shaped through-the-block lot which has a frontage of 100 feet along City Island Avenue and a frontage of about twenty-five feet along Minnieford Avenue. A nonhistoric chain link fence with a non-historic center gate extends along the western edge of the property bordering on City Island Avenue. The southern boundary is established by six-foot-high non-historic wood picket fence that extends eastward to the rear yard of 589 Minnieford Avenue. The wood fence continues northward for about twenty-five feet along the eastern boundary of the property then continues as a chain link fence. The remainder of the boundary is established by the garage opening on to Minnieford Avenue and by a low wrought iron gate. The north boundary is fenced with a combination of chain link (near City Island Avenue and Minnieford Avenue) and a center length of wood pickets. Although the metal gate opening on to Minnieford Avenue probably dates from the early twentieth century, it was not installed at its present location until mid-October 2002. The much-altered non-contributing one-story garage was added to the property in the 1920s, and expanded in the 1940s or 1950s.37 The house is set back about eighteen feet from the street. A non-historic concrete path extends from the front gate to the front porch. Non-historic concrete paths also extend in front of the porch, along the sides and rear of the house and across the rear yard to the garage. To the south of the entrance path is a nonhistoric electric lamppost (installed between1987 and 1991) that replaced a historic gas-lit lamppost. In the rear yard near the path leading to the garage is a second lamppost which has a non-historic metal pole but is topped by the historic framework for a gaslight. The Second Empire style Pell House is an Lshaped building, comprised of a three-story main block, which is five bays wide and two bays deep, and a one-and-one-half-story rear kitchen wing, which is two bays wide and two bays deep. The house rests on a stone base which is lit by low wide basement windows that are set deep into the wall. (Because they are set so far back, it is impossible to tell whether they retain historic sash.) The upper walls of the house are sheathed with lapped-clapboards and its window and door openings are set off by molded wood surrounds. The sides elevations of the main block have angled two-story window bays. Most of the windows have historic two-over-two wood sashes. Many of the windows are also protected by historic top-hungwoodframed casement storm sash with two lights joined by a horizontal glazing bar. The facades are crowned by overhanging wood cornices enriched with paired brackets. The building’s most striking feature, the elaborate mansard roof, remains intact, retaining its original bracketed pedimented dormers, polychrome slate shingles, metal flashing, and brick chimneys. (The chimneys have been parged with stucco and have non-historic flue caps but otherwise retain their original form.) The wood porches that extend across the front of the building and the south side of the kitchen wing retain their historic turned columns, original stylized brackets, curvilinear bracing, and molded cornices. The Main Block The house’s primary facade, facing westward to City Island Avenue, has a symmetrical five-bay design with a wide center ba
Samuel Pell House
Samuel Pell House
City Island, The Bronx This imposing residence, constructed around 1876, is a fine and well-preserved example of the freestanding Second Empire style frame houses that once proliferated in the rural areas of New York City but are now increasingly being altered or demolished. Built for oysterman Samuel Pell, it is significant reminder of the enormous wealth that the oyster trade brought to the maritime community of City Island in the nineteenth century. The Second Empire style is unusually well-represented on the island with thirteen surviving houses of which the Pell house is the grandest and best preserved. A five-bay-wide, three-story frame building, the Pell house is sheathed in its original clapboards and retains its historic two-over-two fenestration. It is richly embellished with heavy molded door and window surrounds, bracketed cornices, bay windows, and porches with turned posts and curved wood braces. The unusually well-preserved and elaborately-detailed mansard roof retains its original patterned polychrome slate shingles, pedimented dormers, and decorative metal flashing. Samuel Pell was a descendent of the Pell family that once owned this area of the Bronx. He and his children, who occupied this house until about 1900, were prominent members of the City Island community. In 1907, the house was sold to James Feeley, a partner in a wholesale lace curtain importing firm. In the late 1920s, the house passed to his son Edgar J. Feeley, a prominent attorney and part owner-officer of the New York Giants baseball team, who occupied the house until his death in 1972. It is currently being used as a residence. The Samuel Pell House occupies an L-shaped through-the-block lot which has a frontage of 100 feet along City Island Avenue and a frontage of about twenty-five feet along Minnieford Avenue. A nonhistoric chain link fence with a non-historic center gate extends along the western edge of the property bordering on City Island Avenue. The southern boundary is established by six-foot-high non-historic wood picket fence that extends eastward to the rear yard of 589 Minnieford Avenue. The wood fence continues northward for about twenty-five feet along the eastern boundary of the property then continues as a chain link fence. The remainder of the boundary is established by the garage opening on to Minnieford Avenue and by a low wrought iron gate. The north boundary is fenced with a combination of chain link (near City Island Avenue and Minnieford Avenue) and a center length of wood pickets. Although the metal gate opening on to Minnieford Avenue probably dates from the early twentieth century, it was not installed at its present location until mid-October 2002. The much-altered non-contributing one-story garage was added to the property in the 1920s, and expanded in the 1940s or 1950s.37 The house is set back about eighteen feet from the street. A non-historic concrete path extends from the front gate to the front porch. Non-historic concrete paths also extend in front of the porch, along the sides and rear of the house and across the rear yard to the garage. To the south of the entrance path is a nonhistoric electric lamppost (installed between1987 and 1991) that replaced a historic gas-lit lamppost. In the rear yard near the path leading to the garage is a second lamppost which has a non-historic metal pole but is topped by the historic framework for a gaslight. The Second Empire style Pell House is an Lshaped building, comprised of a three-story main block, which is five bays wide and two bays deep, and a one-and-one-half-story rear kitchen wing, which is two bays wide and two bays deep. The house rests on a stone base which is lit by low wide basement windows that are set deep into the wall. (Because they are set so far back, it is impossible to tell whether they retain historic sash.) The upper walls of the house are sheathed with lapped-clapboards and its window and door openings are set off by molded wood surrounds. The sides elevations of the main block have angled two-story window bays. Most of the windows have historic two-over-two wood sashes. Many of the windows are also protected by historic top-hungwoodframed casement storm sash with two lights joined by a horizontal glazing bar. The facades are crowned by overhanging wood cornices enriched with paired brackets. The building’s most striking feature, the elaborate mansard roof, remains intact, retaining its original bracketed pedimented dormers, polychrome slate shingles, metal flashing, and brick chimneys. (The chimneys have been parged with stucco and have non-historic flue caps but otherwise retain their original form.) The wood porches that extend across the front of the building and the south side of the kitchen wing retain their historic turned columns, original stylized brackets, curvilinear bracing, and molded cornices. The Main Block The house’s primary facade, facing westward to City Island Avenue, has a symmetrical five-bay desi

decorative metal ceiling tiles
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