SCIENCE LAB EQUIPMENT LIST : SCIENCE LAB

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Science Lab Equipment List


science lab equipment list
    equipment list
  • A general term that includes all necessary guitar, bass and keyboard amplifiers, drums, microphone stands and cables. (also known as Backline)
    science lab
  • A laboratory (informally, lab) is a facility that provides controlled conditions in which scientific research, experiments, and measurement may be performed.
  • lab: a workplace for the conduct of scientific research
  • (Science labs) Some science labs can be conducted from your own home. Others are supervised and taken in a group at a specific time and location. Science lab information.
science lab equipment list - CERT Emergency
CERT Emergency Deluxe Action Response Unit Gear Bag (Community Emergency Response Teams)
CERT Emergency Deluxe Action Response Unit Gear Bag (Community Emergency Response Teams)
1 - C.E.R.T. Hard Hat 1 - Gear Bag (Green w/Logo) 1 - Heavy Duty Work Gloves 1 - Chemical Goggles (Vented) 1 - 12 Hour Light Stick (Green) 1 - Saftey Vest (Lime Green w/Reflective Orange Trim) 1 - N95 Dust Mask (One) 1 - Large Mayday Solar Blanket 1 - "D" Size Flashlight 1 - Pair of "D" Alkaline Batteries (5 Year Shelf Life) 1 - 24" Pry Bar 1 - Lumber Crayon 1 - 14-in-1 Pocket Tool 1 - Knee Pads (XL) 1 - 4-in-1 Gas & Water Shut Off 1 - Duct Tape (10 Yards) 1 - Metal Whistle 1 - 300' "Caution" Tape (2 mil.) 1 - Rope (1/4" x 100') 12 - Mayday Pouch Water (4.225 oz.) 1 - 5-in-1 Whistle 1 - Mighty Mega Mite Megaphone w/Siren 2 - "C" Batteries (pair) 1 - 12OO Calorie Food Bar 1 - Blue Tarp 8 x 10 1 - Deluxe Poncho w/C.E.R.T. Logo CERT Kit also contains: First Aid 1. Bloodstopper 12. 4X4 Sterile Gauze Pads 1. Hydrogen Peroxide (4 oz.) 2. 1 x 10 Yds. Adhesive Tape 1. EMT Paramidic Scissors 2. SPF 30 Toweletts (Foil Pack) 2. Latex Gloves (1 Pair) deluxe CERT kits, deluxe CERT kit CERT responder kits, CERT response kit

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Steve Smith
Steve Smith
Steve Smith is a veteran of four space flights covering 16 million miles and seven space walks totaling 49 hours and 25 minutes. Smith’s spacewalk time places him in the top five on the all-time American and World spacewalk duration lists. He joined NASA in 1989 in the Mission Operations Directorate. As a payload officer, his duties included preflight payload integration and real-time flight controller support in Mission Control. He was selected as an astronaut candidate by NASA in 1992 and then completed one year of astronaut candidate training. In September 1993, Smith became the first member of the 1992 astronaut class to receive a flight assignment. He has served as the Astronaut Office representative for the Space Shuttle main engines, the solid rocket boosters, the external tank, and Shuttle safety. Smith was also assigned to duties at the Kennedy Space Center for a year and a half as a member of the astronaut support team. The team was responsible for Space Shuttle prelaunch vehicle checkout, crew ingress and strap-in prior to launch, and crew egress post landing. After STS-103, he served as the Deputy Chief Astronaut for a year. Smith served as a mission specialist aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour on Mission STS-68 in September 1994. Smith’s responsibilities were split between Shuttle systems and Space Radar Lab 2 (SRL-2, the flight’s primary payload). Smith was one of two crewmen trained to perform a space walk had one been required. Endeavour circled Earth 183 times and traveled 4.7 million miles during the 11-day flight. Smith performed three space walks as a member of the February 1997 STS-82 Discovery crew which serviced the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The crew completed five space walks in order to improve the scientific capability of the telescope and to replace degraded equipment. The flight orbited the Earth 150 times covering 4.1 million miles during the 10-day flight. Smith returned to the Hubble Space Telescope and performed two spacewalks as the Payload Commander for STS-103 in December 1999. The crew performed three space walks to return Hubble to science operations with several upgraded subsystems. STS-103 orbited the Earth 120 times covering 3.2 million miles in just under 8 days. As the lead spacewalker of the April 2002 STS-110 Atlantis crew which installed the SO (S-Zero) Truss on the International Space Station, Smith performed two of the flight’s four space walks. The crew spent a week in joint operations with the station’s Expedition-4 crew. The STS-110 mission covered 4.5 million miles during 171 orbits in just under 11 days. Steve Smith currently serves as the NASA International Space Station Program Liaison to the European Space Agency.
Stephen Smith
Stephen Smith
Steve Smith is a veteran of four space flights covering 16 million miles and seven space walks totaling 49 hours and 25 minutes. Smith’s spacewalk time places him in the top five on the all-time American and World spacewalk duration lists. He joined NASA in 1989 in the Mission Operations Directorate. As a payload officer, his duties included preflight payload integration and real-time flight controller support in Mission Control. He was selected as an astronaut candidate by NASA in 1992 and then completed one year of astronaut candidate training. Smith served as a mission specialist aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour on Mission STS-68 in September 1994. Smith’s responsibilities were split between Shuttle systems and Space Radar Lab 2 (SRL-2, the flight’s primary payload). Smith was one of two crewmen trained to perform a space walk had one been required. Endeavour circled Earth 183 times and traveled 4.7 million miles during the 11-day flight. Smith performed three space walks as a member of the February 1997 STS-82 Discovery crew which serviced the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The crew completed five space walks in order to improve the scientific capability of the telescope and to replace degraded equipment. The flight orbited the Earth 150 times covering 4.1 million miles during the 10-day flight. Smith returned to the Hubble Space Telescope and performed two spacewalks as the Payload Commander for STS-103 in December 1999. The crew performed three space walks to return Hubble to science operations with several upgraded subsystems. STS-103 orbited the Earth 120 times covering 3.2 million miles in just under 8 days. As the lead spacewalker of the April 2002 STS-110 Atlantis crew which installed the SO (S-Zero) Truss on the International Space Station, Smith performed two of the flight’s four space walks. The crew spent a week in joint operations with the station’s Expedition-4 crew. The STS-110 mission covered 4.5 million miles during 171 orbits in just under 11 days.

science lab equipment list
science lab equipment list
Outdoor Recreation Checklists (Equipment Lists and Tradeoffs for All Major Outdoor Activities)
What is the purpose and scope of this book? This publication is intended to be a general guideline for equipment needs for a wide set of popular outdoor recreation activities. We do not tout this as an everything-you-need-to-know-about-equipment manual, but rather an entry- and intermediate-level book which identifies key features of outdoor equipment that you should consider before proceeding on your adventure or before purchasing. Some advanced gear is discussed for those thinking to move beyond the intermediate level. For more detailed information, we would steer you to the reference books listed near the end of this book and to the many excellent outdoor recreation shops which sell individual activity gear. The equipment lists and top-level equipment tradeoffs were compiled by a group of individuals with expertise across the activities. The detailed equipment lists are necessarily broad in order to cover the four seasons as well as regional differences. They! include door-to-outdoor item considerations, i.e. from auto anti-freeze to recreation gear for cold-weather activities.
As a fallout, this book might serve to identify alternate activity uses for gear you already own. It may also assist you in selecting gear which will best serve multiple activities, given that you don't have the pocketbook to buy the optimum gear for each activity.
The intent is not for the reader to take every listed item to the great outdoors, but rather to tailor his or her needs from a large list of items, picking and choosing between necessities and conveniences, subject to packing space and weight limits. In many cases, outdoor gear can be carried in by one member for use by the group. The lists are laid out for convenient multiple-activity use, e.g., where a camping trip is planned with mountain biking and/or water sports conducted out of the base camp. There obviously will be gear that is overlooked because it is not part of our group's repertoire. Since each user may also have unique needs that are not listed, space is provided to add to the base checklists. The book focuses on equipment, however there are limited discussions on how best to live with Mother Nature scattered throughout.
How is the book organized? A short description of the best method for use of this book is provided initially. In the SAMPLE CHECKLIST section which follows, the checklist organization is discussed and a filled-in example is provided for camping (VEHICLE-ACCESSIBLE CAMPING activity) combined with mountain biking (MOUNTAIN BIKING-Daytime activity). Next, the GENERAL CONSIDERATIONS section discusses the responsibilities of people in the outdoors to themselves, to others and to the environment. The book's core is in the EQUIPMENT SELECTION section; this starts by describing the specific need for and characteristics of each item in the VEHICLE-ACCESSIBLE CAMPING activity, since these tend to be items which are common to many of the subsequent activities. Beyond are the checklists and item discussions for hiking (HIKING, BACKPACKING), climbing (GLACIER/WINTER CLIMBING, ROCK CLIMBING), biking (BICYCLE TOURING, MOUNTAIN BIKING), winter sports (ALPINE SKIING, NORDIC SKIING/SNOWSHOEIN! G, SNOWMOBILING), boating (CANOEING, KAYAKING, SAILING, POWERBOATING), water sports (WATER SPORTS) and fishing (INLAND FISHING, SEA FISHING) in that order. FIRST AID and MEALS, which are common to all activities, are provided with their own checklists. The LIST of PRIORITY GEAR follows, identifying key equipment that is common to many activities. Next is the REFERENCE section containing a few selected sources that provide additional detail in the individual activity areas. (Some are reference standards. Others are lesser-known, but highly informative sources. View this as a "starter-kit" list.) Finally, the INDEX is key to finding descriptive information for specific equipment items, since items common to many activities may be discussed in elsewhere in the book.

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