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August 2011

August 1, 2011 Meeting
Bartlesville Public Library Meeting Room

 
    6:45 p.m.   Setup and open discussion
   7:00 p.m.   Club Business

   7:15 p.m.   Introduction to ...
           7:30 p.m.                                                      In Defense of the Big Bang, DVD lecture
 by Professor Neil deGrasse Tyson

The Big Bang theory is often misunderstood and, sometimes, even discounted. Throughout time, people have asked questions about the origins of the universe and, for most of time, the answers to those questions were provided by mythology. The twentieth century was the first period in history in which we were able to use the methods and tools of science to answer out questions. We now know without doubt how the universe began, how it evolved, and how it will end.

 8:15 p.m.   Open Discussion


Four Infamous Telescope Myths: Stop me if you've heard this one before! Here are some plausible-sounding ideas that turn out to be less than true. 
(http://www.skyandtelescope.com/howto/visualobserving/3305656.html?page=3&c=y)
by Gary Seronik
  • July 28, 29 - Southern Delta Aquarids Meteor Shower. The Delta Aquarids can produce about 20 meteors per hour at their peak. The shower usually peaks on July 28 & 29, but some meteors can also be seen from July 18 - August 18. The radiant point for this shower will be in the constellation Aquarius. This year the thin, crescent moon will be hanging around for the show, but it shouldn’t cause too many problems. Best viewing is usually to the east after midnight from a dark location.

  • July 30 - New Moon. The Moon will be directly between the Earth and the Sun and will not be visible from Earth. This phase occurs at 18:40 UTC.

  • August 12, 13 - Perseids Meteor Shower. The Perseids is one of the best meteor showers to observe, producing up to 60 meteors per hour at their peak. The shower's peak usually occurs on August 13 & 14, but you may be able to see some meteors any time from July 23 - August 22. The radiant point for this shower will be in the constellation Perseus. The full moon will definitely be a problem this year, hiding the fainter meteors with its glare. But with up to 60 meteors per hour possible, it could still be a great show. Find a location far from city lights and look to the northeast after midnight.

  • August 13 - Full Moon. The Moon will be directly opposite the Earth from the Sun and will be fully illuminated as seen from Earth. This phase occurs at 18:57 UTC. This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Full Sturgeon Moon because the large sturgeon fish of the Great Lakes and other major lakes were more easily caught at this time of year. This moon has also been known as the Green Corn Moon and the Grain Moon.

  • August 11 - Neptune at Opposition. The blue planet will be at its closest approach to Earth and its face will be fully illuminated by the Sun. This is the best time to view Neptune. Due to its distance, it will only appear as a tiny blue dot in all but the most powerful telescopes.

  • August 29 - New Moon. The Moon will be directly between the Earth and the Sun and will not be visible from Earth. This phase occurs at 03:04 UTC.

(Source: http://www.seasky.org/astronomy/astronomy-calendar-2011.html)



2011 Programs

 Month Program Presenter
 JanThe Cheapskate Astronomer’s Introduction to Astrophotography Rick Bryant
 FebKen Willcox: The Birth of an Eclipse Chaser Daryl Doughty
 MarThe Cheapskate Astronomer’s Introduction to Astrophotography
Part II:  GREMLINS
Rick Bryant
 AprDSLR AstrophotographyDaryl Doughty
 MayPredicting the future evolution of the Universe, might biology come to play an important role?Virgil Reese
 JunThe Greatest Story Ever Told   
DVD by Tyson
 Jul
Dithering and Drizzling Your Astrophotos
 James Campbell
 AugIn Defense of the Big Bang
DVD by Tyson
 Sept  
 Oct  
 Nov  
 Dec  


Next Meeting

September 5, Monday. Bartlesville Public Library Meeting Room (tentative)


Newsletter Contributions Needed

Our club newsletter is reaching more people each month, and member contributions in the form of short articles, interesting news items, alerts of upcoming astronomical events or activities, descriptions of personal observations or useful equipment, and observing tips, are encouraged.  Recurring columns or multipart articles are also welcome.  Please submit your contributions to Mike Woods or to bvilleastro@gmail.com .


The current officers are:

President

John Grismore

Program Chair & Vice President

Daryl Doughty

Information Officer (Newsletter)

Mike Woods

Treasurer

Milt Enderlin / Vicky Travaglini

 


Additional club positions:

 Nominatons  Arden Strycker
 Publicity/Newspaper  Carroll Ritchie
 Publicity/Public Website  Steve Plank & John Grismore
 Member Observing Program  Steve Plank & Arden Strycker
 Meeting Room Arrangements  Steve Plank
 On-Line Media James Campbell
 Visitor/New Member Steward Rick Bryant



Membership is open to everyone interested in any aspects of astronomy. 


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Magazine Subscription (reduced rate for members)

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Astronomy Technology Today Magazine. . . . . . . . . .  . . . . . . . $14.00

Astronomy Magazine. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  . . . . . . . $34.00/yr



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