COOKING BY NUMBER : BY NUMBER

Cooking By Number : Slow Cooking Oven Temperature

Cooking By Number


cooking by number
    cooking
  • The process of preparing food by heating it
  • (cook) prepare a hot meal; "My husband doesn't cook"
  • (cook) someone who cooks food
  • the act of preparing something (as food) by the application of heat; "cooking can be a great art"; "people are needed who have experience in cookery"; "he left the preparation of meals to his wife"
  • Food that has been prepared in a particular way
  • The practice or skill of preparing food
    number
  • Amount to (a specified figure or quantity); comprise
  • total: add up in number or quantity; "The bills amounted to $2,000"; "The bill came to $2,000"
  • the property possessed by a sum or total or indefinite quantity of units or individuals; "he had a number of chores to do"; "the number of parameters is small"; "the figure was about a thousand"
  • Include or classify as a member of a group
  • Mark with a number or assign a number to, typically to indicate position in a series
  • a concept of quantity involving zero and units; "every number has a unique position in the sequence"

Cook Inlet, City of Anchorage, and the Chugach Mountains
Cook Inlet, City of Anchorage, and the Chugach Mountains
Big Sky Anchorage City Profile over Cook Inlet Municipality of Anchorage, Alaska Accessed via Point Worzonof Drive and/or the Tony Knowles Coastal Trail If you can excuse the sensor gremlins in this one...this is the classic tourist shot of the Anchorage skyline from the Tony Knowles Coastal Trail with Cook Inlet in the foreground and the Chugach Mountains at mid-frame. Just behind me is the Ted Stevens Anchorage International Airport, the third busiest cargo hub in the world due to its location between East and West. Geographically, Anchorage is surrounded by mountains and water: the Chugach Mountains to the East, Turnagain Arm, a fjord, to the South and the Knik Arm, a tidal inlet, to the North and West. Anchorage is located in southcentral Alaska and contains some 300,000 folks--an astounding 40% of the population of Alaska (impressive when you think of the immensity of this state)! In comparison, Juneau, Alaska's Capital City, has a population of only thirty thousand. The climate is considered subarctic with heavy moderating maritime influences, keeping summer temperatures somewhat mild (55-78 degrees) and providing frequent rains. There is a common joke in much of the literature that I've been reading that Anchorage is not Alaska, but it is a quick fifteen minute drive from it. And there was indeed a strange feeling about Anchorage when I arrived at first. You know there's epicness all around you, but somehow it is strangely tamed by the comforts of everyday life--Wal-Mart, Best Buy, strip malls, chain restaurants, industrial buildings. It is easy to forget exactly what surrounds you until it smacks you right in the face, like a moose beside the road or clearing clouds illuminating snow-capped mountains that often remained shrouded in obscurity! Most visitors to Alaska start from Anchorage for its proximity to attractions: the Kenai Peninsula and/or Denali being two of the most popular. Perhaps the most surprising thing for me was the relative proximity of things by car and the ease of the road network in general. I'm used to driving three or so hours in a day to reach destinations in the Carolinas, and I'm further used to a number of extremely curvy roads that climb and descend mountains. Alaska's highways are few and are located between the mountains, along rivers, and otherwise flat and straight runs. In many ways, it was the exact opposite of what I'm used to--instead of driving a road like the Blue Ridge Parkway that runs the mountain ridges and provides views down into the valleys below, Alaska's highways run between massive mountains along rivers and valleys with views above and around. My brother-in-law was kind enough to let me ride his new Seven bicycle (a really sweet ride) and took me on a much more intensive look at the city from Anchorage's famed trail network. We rolled some forty-eight or so miles around and through the city on an interconnected trail network that rolled through thick forest, along the coast, through neighborhoods big and small and rich and poor, alongside an active Salmon spawning river (Ship Creek), and back again. Alaska.org quotes the Anchorage Parks & Trails System as having "190 parks covering over 10,000 acres connected by 400 miles of trails." We (my brother-in-law and I) tackled some of the more notable trails, including the Tony Knowles Coastal Trail and Kincaid Park.
Cook on Costs 2009
Cook on Costs 2009
A guide to legal remuneration in civil, contentious and non-contentious business. IF YOU’RE A PRACTIONER, YOU IGNORE COOK AT YOUR PERIL An appreciation by Phillip Taylor MBE, Richmond Green Chambers ‘What does it cost to go to law?’ sounds like a simple enough question with ‘a lot’ being the obvious obfuscatory, imprecise and dismissive answer. The subject is one that bewilders the general public and confounds all too many practitioners, hence the continuing popularity and utility of ‘Cook on Costs’ first published in 1991 and now its 2009 edition which does not disappoint. As Michael Cook explains in his preface, ‘costs law, practice and procedure, is a moving target’ with a bewildering number of changes taking place within relatively short time frame - like right now, for example, as I write! ‘Can there ever have been so many investigations into the future of undertaken at the same time?’ he asks. As this question is a rhetorical one with an obvious answer, it’s not difficult to guess why ‘Cook on Costs’ is published annually. Its regular annual purchase should be considered a necessity by any solicitor who wishes to remain informed and up to date and ‘it will already be on the desk of most judges’ as ‘The Association of Law Costs Draftsmen Journal’ has put it editorially … and they are the people who should know. There are few better examples of the ‘moving target’ aspect of costs law than that of conditional fee agreements (CFAs) i.e. the ‘no win no fee’ agreement, which in principle, I support as a regular presenter for CPD courses. With the legal aid budget now frozen, CFAs are expected to offer ordinary people with ordinary incomes some avenue of hope that they might be able to afford competent representation when the need arises. The current government apparently takes a critical view of CFAs, as evidenced by the committees, academic studies and so forth positioned to snipe at them like ducks in a shooting gallery at your local fun fair. A recent ‘scoping study’ whatever that is, has been undertaken by Professors Fenn, Rickman and Moorhead to look into whether CFAs are operating in the best interests of access to justice. Cook suggests ‘this is little more than a study about how CFAs should be studied (so) don’t hold your breath for its outcome’. With reviews like this of ‘no win no fee’ agreements going on, rumors are rife that they will be eventually restricted, or got rid of altogether, with Jack Straw as the ‘guy with the gun’ blasting the CFA concept out of the water. More will be revealed no doubt when the results of a review of CFAs undertaken by Jackson LJ will be made known. In the interim, ‘Cook on Costs 2009’ shines forth as a beacon of practical guidance to the complexities of all aspects of the costs of contentious and non-contentious legal business. For practitioners new to this highly readable and authoritative work, take a tour round its various segments which cover six headings: solicitor and client; between the parties; quantification; sanctions and penalties; particular people; and funding. It’s normal to see the current ‘Cook on Costs’ on the bench in court. The Law Society Gazette says that Cook ‘has succeeded in making accessible and even interesting, a subject which most solicitors ignore at their peril.’ Absolutely! ISBN: 978-1-4057-2874-4

cooking by number
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