The I-L22 group

          Banks families and other closely related
               persons within Haplogroup I1a2        
          common ancestor likely in far north Europe in pre-Christian era

                   Haplogroup I1 persons are today especially concentrated in Scandinavia though found in
                   significant numbers all over northern Europe.  Haplogroup I1a2 persons have the L22 mutation.
                   While the one family here has tested negative for P109 which comprises a L22 subgroup,
                   there are several mutations which constitute I12 subgroups.
               
                   Link here to info on Haplogroup I in general
                   Link here for information on subhaplogroup I1
                                          a specific page for I1d is not available.

                                                       One Banks grouping so far identified within this subhaplogroup.

                 
     John Banke of Lancashire, 1600s....his Banks descendants later in Shropshire and
             Staffordshire


  
 
: : : : Ancestral
source
 
393 390 19
(394)
391 385
a
385
b
426 388 439 389
i
392 389
ii
458 459
a
459
b
455 454 447 437 448 449 464
a
464
b
464
c
464
d
460 TAGA
H4
YCA
IIa
YCA
IIb
456 607 576 570 CDY
a
CDY
b
442 438
Eccleston, Lancashire 
N9661
14 23 14 10 14 15 11 14 11 12 11 28 15 8 9 8 11 23 16 20 29 11 14 14 16 10 10 19 21 15 14 18 20 35 38 12 9
Robinson of Lancashire 
 
14 23 14 10 14 15 11 14 11 12 11 28 15 8 9 8 11 23 16 20 29 11 14 14 16 10 10 19 21 15 14 19 20 35 38 12 9
Low of
Tennessee 
 
14 23 14 10 14 15 11 14 11 12 11 28 15 8 9 8 11 23 16 20 29 11 14 14 16 10 10 19 21 15 14 19 18 35 38 12 9
Lowe of Scotland
 
14 23 14 10 14 15 11 14 11 12 11 28 15 8 9 8 11 23 16 20 29 11 14 14 16 10 10 19 21 15 14 19 18 35 38 12 9
McNeill of Scotland 
 
13 23 14 10 14 15 11 14 11 12 11 28 15 8 9 8 11 23 16 20 29 11 14 14 16 10 10 19 21 14 14 17 20 35 38 12 10
Bloomfield of England
 
13 23 14 10 14 15 11 14 11 12 11 28 15 8 9 8 11 23 16 20 29 11 14 14 16 10 10 19 21 14 14 17 20 35 38 12 10

                                                     Marker site numbers shown in blue.  Marker values shown in yellow.
                                               Another participant from this family needed to confirm the DNA profile.

                            
John Banke in Eccleston in mid-1600s.  Family (with Banks surname) later in Shropshire
           and Staffordshire and elsewhere.  Participant N9661 is ten generations from ancestor John Banke.  This 
           family was just recently traced to Eccleston.
           Until the later 1600s, Banke or Bancke was the usual spelling of Banks surnames in England.
           Link to the John Banke family at Rootsweb (the links to relatives found at bottom of each page.)

           Based on the number of different values at 37 markers, the men above are very likely to share a common
           male ancestor with our Banks participant within 500 yrs.  Mr. Robinson only mismatches at one marker
           value.  In such instances, the common ancestor likely lived within 150 yrs.  The Robinson ancestor was in
           Manchester, Lancashire, in the mid-1800s, and many descendants moved to Canada.  The Lows are 
           next closest.  There are likely only 2 number mismatches because the change at their marker DYS570
           was likely a 2-value change during a single mutation.  The Lows likely share a common male ancestor within
           300 yrs.  The other two men seem related to each other, and the common ancestor shared with our Banks
           participant is likely farther back in time, perhaps as far back as the Renaissance.

           Our Banks family has a history of a Scottish origin.  This could be the case because several of the matches
           above also have better known Scottish origins. In addition, one of the men matching our Banks participant
           34 of 37 markers seems to have a Scandinavian surname as well as given names.  His marker values are
           not available. It is possible, this Scandinavian man descends from a Scottish ancestor.  If not, this close
           relationship to him points to an emigration to Scotland from Scandinavia no later than the Middle Ages.

           Though special testing only confirms so far that this man belongs to haplogroup I, there have been
           several men relatively close genetically to our man who were determined to belong to haplogroup I1d.
           One of them is Bloomfield (above).  I1a2 is characterized by being positive for the L22 mutation.
           Simultaneously Bloomfield was negative for I1a2's first subgroup characterized by being positive for
           P109.  Robinson who is nearly an exact match to our participant was also found L22+.  In addition, Mr.
           Robinson was tested subsequently for the I1a2 subgroups characterized by having the L205 and L258
           SNP mutations and found negative for these. All closely
           related men  here will have the same results when testing for these SNP mutations.  There are other
           new SNPs not yet tested.

                                               
Comments