The I-P109 group

               Banks families and other closely related
                  persons within Haplogroup I1a2a
          
common ancestor likely in northern Europe in pre-Christian era

                   Haplogroup I1a2a persons are today especially concentrated in Scandinavia though found in
                   significant numbers all over northern Europe.  The specific mutation associated with I1a2a is P109. 
                   The specific marker values seen here on this page are not typical of those from the Viking areas of 
                   northern Scandinavia, but rather are common in southernScandinavia and northern Germany.

                    Link here for information on haplogroup I in general.
                    Link here for information on subhaplogroup I1
                                          a specific page for I1d1 is not available.

                                                       One Banks grouping so far identified within this I1a2a subhaplogroup.  
                                                 
                                                         
Edward Banks of s.w. Ireland early 1800s...sons went to Iowa or stayed in Co. Limerick

  
 
: : : : Ancestral
source
 
393 390 19
(394)
391 385
a
385
b
426 388 439 389
  i
392 389
ii
458 459
a
459
b
455 454 447 437 448 449 464
a
464
b
464
c
464
d
460 TAGA
H4
YCA
IIa
YCA
IIb
456 607 576 570 CDY
a
CDY
b
442 438
Co. Limerick, Ireland 
47658
13 23 14 10 14 15 11 15 12 12 11 28 15 8 9 8 11 23 16 20 28 12 14 15 16 11 10 19 21 14 15 16 21 37 38 12 10
Co. Limerick, Ireland
61594
13 23 14 10 14 15 11 15 12 12 11 28
Huttons, Kincardine, Scotland 
 
13 23 14 10 14 15 11 15 12 12 11 28 15 8 9 8 11 23 16 20 28 12 14 15 16 11 10 19 21 14 15 16 20 38 38 12 10
Tuttles
N'hamptonshire
England 
 
13 23 14 10 14 15 11 15 12 12 11 28 15 8 9 8 11 23 16 20 28 12 14 15 16 13 9 19 21 14 15 16 22 37 37 12 10


                                                  Marker site numbers shown in blue.  Marker values shown in yellow.
                                                 The red background behind a marker indicates a difference in value




Descendants of Edward Banks who was in Lurriga, Co. Limerick, Ireland, in the 1820s.
           Son George and presumed son James were later in Warren Co., Iowa.  The family may have
           originally emigrated to Ireland.   Participant 47658  is six generations from ancestor Edward Banks.    
            Participant 61594 is five generations from the same Edward by a different son of Edward. 
           Link to the Edward Banks family at Rootsweb  (the links to relatives found at bottom of each page)
           A descendant of a Hutton man who was in Scotland in the 1700s, with descendants later in Scotland
           or England, matches 61594's markers 35 of 37 and is closely related with a common male ancestor likely 
           sometime in the last 300-400 years.  Though special testing only confirms so far that these samples
           here belong to haplogroup I1d1, among the closest genetic matches to the family here are several 
           men who share common male ancestors within 2000 yrs who have been confirmed at I1a2a.


Pertinent to the Irish Banks family here is this study:
 Eur J Hum Genet. 2006 Dec;14(12):1288-94. Epub 2006 Sep 6.  The scale and nature of Viking settlement in Ireland from Y-chromosome
admixture analysis.McEvoy BBrady CMoore LTBradley DG. Smurfit Institute of Genetics, Trinity College, Dublin 2, Ireland.
The Vikings (or Norse) played a prominent role in Irish history but, despite this, their genetic legacy in Ireland, which may provide
insights into the nature and scale of their immigration, is largely unexplored. Irish surnames, some of which are thought to have
Norse roots, are paternally inherited in a similar manner to Y-chromosomes. The correspondence of Scandinavian patrilineal
ancestry in a cohort of Irish men bearing surnames of putative Norse origin was examined using both slow mutating unique
event polymorphisms and relatively rapidly changing short tandem repeat Y-chromosome markers. Irish and Scandinavian
admixture proportions were explored for both systems using six different admixture estimators, allowing a parallel investigation
of the impact of method and marker type in Y-chromosome admixture analysis. Admixture proportion estimates in the putative
Norse surname group were highly consistent and detected little trace of Scandinavian ancestry. In addition, there is scant
evidence of Scandinavian Y-chromosome introgression in a general Irish population sample. Although conclusions are largely
dependent on the accurate identification of Norse surnames, the findings are consistent with a relatively small number of
Norse settlers (and descendents) migrating to Ireland during the Viking period (ca. AD 800-1200) suggesting that Norse
colonial settlements might have been largely composed of indigenous Irish. This observation adds to previous genetic
studies that point to a flexible Viking settlement approach across North Atlantic Europe.

PMID: 16957681 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

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