FOAM FLOOR SQUARES - FOAM FLOOR

Foam Floor Squares - Floor 12

Foam Floor Squares


foam floor squares
    squares
  • A plane figure with four equal straight sides and four right angles
  • make square; "Square the circle"; "square the wood with a file"
  • (square) the product of two equal terms; "nine is the second power of three"; "gravity is inversely proportional to the square of the distance"
  • A thing having such a shape or approximately such a shape
  • A thing having the shape or approximate shape of a cube
  • (square) having four equal sides and four right angles or forming a right angle; "a square peg in a round hole"; "a square corner"
    floor
  • All the rooms or areas on the same level of a building; a story
  • the inside lower horizontal surface (as of a room, hallway, tent, or other structure); "they needed rugs to cover the bare floors"; "we spread our sleeping bags on the dry floor of the tent"
  • shock: surprise greatly; knock someone's socks off; "I was floored when I heard that I was promoted"
  • A level area or space used or designed for a particular activity
  • a structure consisting of a room or set of rooms at a single position along a vertical scale; "what level is the office on?"
  • The lower surface of a room, on which one may walk
    foam
  • A similar mass formed from saliva or sweat
  • a lightweight material in cellular form; made by introducing gas bubbles during manufacture
  • a mass of small bubbles formed in or on a liquid; "the beer had a thick head of foam"
  • A mass of small bubbles formed on or in liquid, typically by agitation or fermentation
  • A thick preparation containing many small bubbles
  • become bubbly or frothy or foaming; "The boiling soup was frothing"; "The river was foaming"; "Sparkling water"
foam floor squares - Trademark Tools
Trademark Tools 75-6400 Hawk Ultimate Comfort Foam Flooring, 16-Square Feet
Trademark Tools 75-6400 Hawk Ultimate Comfort Foam Flooring, 16-Square Feet
Give yourself a little luxury with this anti-fatigue padded flooring - comfortable and tough construction for excellent wear that saves your feet legs and back. Simple to put together in any shape and color pattern to cover heavy traffic areas or an entire room. Features: 2-ft x 2-ft foam-rubber floor tiles that you easily put together in any combination Cushioning 3/8"-thick pads are tough and durable Water-resistant and a breeze to clean Jig-saw edge notches hold together even under heavy traffic Textured slip-resistant surface Set of four interlocking padded tiles one each of 4 colors One set covers 16 sq ft

86% (5)
PA - Mill Run: Fallingwater - Music Area
PA - Mill Run: Fallingwater - Music Area
Fallingwater's 1,800-square-foot living room includes a music area, or music alcove, for listening to phonograph records. The Zabuton, 25?" x 29?" floor cushions, were designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1939. The High Hassocks (not pictured), also designed by Wright, are taller versions of the Zabuton at 12" x 26" x 21?". They represent one of the earliest uses of latex foam, a material suggested by Edgar Jaufmann Jr., in a residential setting. Surrounded by a walnut veneer frame, the floor cushions are upholsted with either a red or yellow, heavily textured, wool blend Jack Lenor Larsen fabric called Doria. The free floating seats of differing heights help create a casual environment. Fallingwater, sometimes referred to as the Edgar J. Kaufmann Sr. Residence or just the Kaufmann Residence, located within a 5,100-acre nature reserve 50 miles southeast of Pittsburgh, was designed by Frank Lloyd Wright and built between 1936 and 1939. Built over a 30-foot flowing waterfall on Bear Run in the Mill Run section of Stewart Township, Fayette County, Pennsylvania, the house served as a vacation retreat for the Kaufmann family including patriarch, Edgar Kaufmann Sr., was a successful Pittsburgh businessman and president of Kaufmann's Department Store, and his son, Edgar Kaufmann, Jr., who studied architecture briefly under Wright. Wright collaborated with staff engineers Mendel Glickman and William Wesley Peters on the structural design, and assigned his apprentice, Robert Mosher, as his permanent on-site representative throughout construction. Despite frequent conflicts between Wright, Kaufmann, and the construction contractor, the home and guesthouse were finally constructed at a cost of $155,000. Fallingwater was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1966. It was listed among the Smithsonian's 28 Places to See Before You Die. In a 1991 poll of members of the American Institute of Architects (AIA), it was voted "the best all-time work of American architecture." In 2007, Fallingwater was ranked #29 on the AIA 150 America's Favorite Architecture list. National Register #74001781 (1974) Fallingwater, sometimes referred to as the Edgar J. Kaufmann Sr. Residence or just the Kaufmann Residence, located within a 5,100-acre nature reserve 50 miles southeast of Pittsburgh, was designed by Frank Lloyd Wright and built between 1936 and 1939. Built over a 30-foot flowing waterfall on Bear Run in the Mill Run section of Stewart Township, Fayette County, Pennsylvania, the house served as a vacation retreat for the Kaufmann family including patriarch, Edgar Kaufmann Sr., was a successful Pittsburgh businessman and president of Kaufmann's Department Store, and his son, Edgar Kaufmann, Jr., who studied architecture briefly under Wright. Wright collaborated with staff engineers Mendel Glickman and William Wesley Peters on the structural design, and assigned his apprentice, Robert Mosher, as his permanent on-site representative throughout construction. Despite frequent conflicts between Wright, Kaufmann, and the construction contractor, the home and guesthouse were finally constructed at a cost of $155,000. Fallingwater was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1966. It was listed among the Smithsonian's 28 Places to See Before You Die. In a 1991 poll of members of the American Institute of Architects (AIA), it was voted "the best all-time work of American architecture." In 2007, Fallingwater was ranked #29 on the AIA 150 America's Favorite Architecture list. National Register #74001781 (1974)
PA - Mill Run: Faillingwater - Living Room
PA - Mill Run: Faillingwater - Living Room
A boulder top, rising unaltered above the level of the first floor, serves as the hearth of the fireplace and the center of Fallingwater. To the left hangs a spherical kettle that can be swung over the fire. A boulder top, rising unaltered above the level of the first floor, serves as the hearth of the 1,800-square-foot living room fireplace and the functional and spiritual heart of Fallingwater. To the left hangs a spherical Cherokee-red kettle that can be swung over the fire. The kettle, copied after one Frank Lloyd Wright used at Taliesin, was intended to serve mulled wine, but proved unworkable. The fireplace fork is signed by the master ironworker Samuel Yellin, who made it around 1930 for La Tourelle. The Zabuton, 25?" x 29?" floor cushions, were designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1939. The High Hassocks (not pictured), also designed by Wright, are taller versions of the Zabuton at 12" x 26" x 21?". They represent one of the earliest uses of latex foam, a material suggested by Edgar Jaufmann Jr., in a residential setting. Surrounded by a walnut veneer frame, the floor cushions are upholsted with either a red or yellow, heavily textured, wool blend Jack Lenor Larsen fabric called Doria. The free floating seats of differing heights help create a casual environment. Fallingwater, sometimes referred to as the Edgar J. Kaufmann Sr. Residence or just the Kaufmann Residence, located within a 5,100-acre nature reserve 50 miles southeast of Pittsburgh, was designed by Frank Lloyd Wright and built between 1936 and 1939. Built over a 30-foot flowing waterfall on Bear Run in the Mill Run section of Stewart Township, Fayette County, Pennsylvania, the house served as a vacation retreat for the Kaufmann family including patriarch, Edgar Kaufmann Sr., was a successful Pittsburgh businessman and president of Kaufmann's Department Store, and his son, Edgar Kaufmann, Jr., who studied architecture briefly under Wright. Wright collaborated with staff engineers Mendel Glickman and William Wesley Peters on the structural design, and assigned his apprentice, Robert Mosher, as his permanent on-site representative throughout construction. Despite frequent conflicts between Wright, Kaufmann, and the construction contractor, the home and guesthouse were finally constructed at a cost of $155,000. Fallingwater was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1966. It was listed among the Smithsonian's 28 Places to See Before You Die. In a 1991 poll of members of the American Institute of Architects (AIA), it was voted "the best all-time work of American architecture." In 2007, Fallingwater was ranked #29 on the AIA 150 America's Favorite Architecture list. National Register #74001781 (1974)

foam floor squares
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