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  • The Northern Suburbs (also known as Central North, Inner Northwest, Macquarie District, Ryde District and Northern District) is a general term used to describe the metropolitan area on the northern bank of the Parramatta River in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia east of West Pennant Hills and
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A Native's Guide to Chicago's Northern Suburbs
A Native's Guide to Chicago's Northern Suburbs
There's Life In the Suburbs! Whether youre a life-long resident, new in town, or just passing through,let A Natives Guide to Chicagos Northern Suburbs be your personal tour guide of the best this region has to offer: History Historical homes, forts, churches, cemeteries, schools... Culture Chamber music and symphonies, outdoor concerts and sculpture, Bach Week and the Nutcracker on Ice, award-winning theater and celebrated museums... Recreation Hiking, biking, canoeing, marathons, bocce ball, bowling, golf, beaches, water parks,lagoons, nature centers, botanical gardens... Dining Four star restaurants, delis, coffeehouses, lunch counters, and ethnic banquet halls. French pastries, pizza, Korean barbecue,charhouse chops, tapas, tamales, piles of pasta, caviar & Cognac... Entertainment Ravinia, Russian nightclubs and youthful discos, elegant cocktail lounges and cigar salons, billiards and roadside pubs, college football, landmark movie theaters... Shopping Giant mega-malls and quaint corner stores, chocalatiers and dairymarts, mystery bookstores and timeless toy shops, handmade pottery and high-tech gadgets... Special Events Art fairs, food feasts, Oktoberfests, winter carnivals, ethnic celebrations, comedy workshops... Full of the fascinating sights, places, stories, and facts that sometimes even locals don't know about, "A Natives Guide To Chicagos Northern Suburbs" equips you with everything you need to enjoy and navigate the suburbs like a true insider. From wine festivals to the Mud Fest, from piano-side surf and turf to tiramisu at McDonalds, from the worlds largest garage sale to exquisite art galleries, the "Natives Guide" is your essential guide to Chicagos Northern Suburbs.

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Bedford Park Congregational Church
Bedford Park Congregational Church
Bedford Park, Bronx, New York City, New York, United States Erected in 1891-92 to the designs of Edgar K. Bourne, the Bedford Park Congregational Church survives as a rare example in New York City of a small rustic late-nineteenth-century suburban church. Bedford Park Congregational exemplifies such churches in its asymmetrical massing accentuated by a picturesque tower and other projections and in its incorporation of architectural forms and features associated with Queen Anne and Shingle style buildings. It is constructed of rough-dressed fieldstone and features a shingled Richardsonian Romanesque style tower, squat buttresses, round-arched windows with voussoirs, and a timber-framed Queen Anne style porch. The plan of the building, which includes a vestibule, Sunday school meeting room, and auditorium- plan worship space, is typical of Congregational churches from the period and is expressed in the exterior design of the building. Bedford Park was a planned suburban community for middle-class families developed in the 1880s after the model of the renowned London suburb of the same name. Founded in 1889 by the prominent Congregational minister, Shearjashub Bourne, who was the architect's father, the Bedford Park Congregational Church was the first major social institution in the neighborhood and has remained a vital part of the community. Bedford Park In the 1860s, the neighborhood now known as Bedford Park !ay entirely within the vast property owned by financier Leonard Jerome's Jerome Park Villa Site Improvement Company. A noted sportsman, Jerome helped to organize the American Jockey Club, which leased a 230-acre tract from the improvement company in 1866 for a racetrack, Jerome Park [erected on the site of present-day Lehman College]. To ensure that the racetrack would be easily accessible and to further development in the area, Jerome persuaded the Township of West Farms to finance a paved boulevard, Central Avenue (now Jerome Avenue), linking the Central (Macomb's Dam) Bridge to Central Avenue in Yonkers. Jerome then began selling off his other Bronx properties including the future Bedford Park tract, which he sold to George Caulfield in November 1869. In 1872, Caufield sold the twenty-five acre Bedford Park tract to three partners: the dry goods merchant Horace B. Claflin, the realtor Daniel R. Kendall, and Charles L. Anthony. After Anthony's death in 1874, his share passed to his partners. They established a corporation, the Twenty-Fourth Ward Real Estate Association, to develop the property. Streets were laid out and the blocks were subdivided into house lots, but buildings were not erected until the early 1880s/ The boundaries of the subdivision were Webster Avenue (aka Berrian Avenue) on the east, Brook Street (now East Mosholu Parkway South) on the north, Bainbridge Avenue (aka Williamsbridge Avenue) on the west, and Southern Boulevard on the south. Southern Boulevard, opened in 1882, was a wide boulevard extending from Jerome Avenue near Jerome Park to East 133 Street and Third Avenue in the South Bronx, where it opened on to the Harlem River (now Third Avenue) Bridge to Manhattan. With this transportation link in place, the developers erected about a dozen houses. The developers then persuaded the New York & Harlem River Railroad Company to run a few commuter trains each day to the Jerome Park railroad station which was located just to the west of the subdivision. In 1884, newspaper accounts extolled the virtues of the new development which had been named Bedford Park after the renowned London suburb. The Bronx development was intended for "New Yorkers of moderate means" who would be given "a chance to become owners of comfortable homes on easy terms.'** Like its English counterpart, Bedford Park was built up with "pretty cottages" in the Queen Anne style, planned to be "convenient and comfortable" as well as "unique" in design. The houses ranged in size from cottages of seven or eight rooms to much bigger structures, "more like ... mansions." They were located on large lots that provided ample space for gardens. Near the railroad station, shops, built low and on ground apart from the residences so as not to mar "the villa effect," provided such "immediate domestic necessities as those from butcher and druggist." Skillful marketing and the promise of additional amenities, such as the opening of the New York Botanical Garden in 1891, helped to make Bedford Park a success. By 1890, the development had about 560 residents, mostly families. With no church closer than the Fordham Methodist Church at 196th Street and Marion Avenue, the American Home Mission Society sent the Reverend Shearjashub Bourne to Bedford Park in 1889 to see if the residents would be interested in establishing a church. Congregationalism and the American Home Mission society The Pilgrims brought Congregationalism to America in the 1
Bedford Park Congregational Church
Bedford Park Congregational Church
Bedford Park, Bronx Landmarks Preservation Commission June 20, 2000; Designation List 315 LP-2062 BEDFORD PARK CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH, 2988 Bainbridge Avenue (aka 301 East 20!" Street), The Bronx. Built 1891-92; Edgar K. Bourne, architect. Landmark Site: Borough of Bronx Tax Map Block 3299, Lot 1. On Apri! 25, 2000, the Landmarks Preservation Commission held a pubtic hearing on the proposed designation as a Landmark of the Bedford Park Congregationa! Church and the proposed designation of the re!ated Landmark Site (Item No. 1). The hearing had been duly advertised in accordance with the provisions of law. Eight witnesses spoke in favor of the designation including the pastor, the President of the Board of Trustees, and three members of the church and representatives of the Historic Districts Council and Bronx Landmarks Task Force. There were no speakers in opposition to the designation. The Commission has received letters of support for this designation from Councilwoman June Eisland and Congressman Eliot L. Engel. Summary Erected in 1891-92 to the designs of Edgar K. Bourne, the Bedford Park Congregational Church survives as a rare example in New York City of a small rustic late-nineteenth-century suburban church. Bedford Park Congregational exemplifies such churches in its asymmetrical massing accentuated by a picturesque tower and other projections and in its incorporation of architectural forms and features associated with Queen Anne and Shingle style buildings. It is constructed of rough-dressed fieldstone and features a shingled Richardsonian Romanesque style tower, squat buttresses, round-arched windows with voussoirs, and a timber-framed Queen Anne style porch. The plan of the building, which includes a vestibule, Sunday school meeting room, and auditorium- plan worship space, is typical of Congregational churches from the period and is expressed in the exterior design of the building. Bedford Park was a planned suburban community for middle-class families developed in the 1880s after the model of the renowned London suburb of the same name. Founded in 1889 by the prominent Congregational minister, Shearjashub Bourne, who was the architect's father, the Bedford Park Congregational Church was the first major social institution in the neighborhood and has remained a vital part of the community. Bedford Park In the 1860s, the neighborhood now known as Bedford Park !ay entirely within the vast property owned by financier Leonard Jerome's Jerome Park Villa Site Improvement Company. A noted sportsman, Jerome helped to organize the American Jockey Club, which leased a 230-acre tract from the improvement company in 1866 for a racetrack, Jerome Park [erected on the site of present-day Lehman College]. To ensure that the racetrack would be easily accessible and to further development in the area, Jerome persuaded the Township of West Farms to finance a paved boulevard, Central Avenue (now Jerome Avenue), linking the Central (Macomb's Dam) Bridge to Central Avenue in Yonkers. Jerome then began selling off his other Bronx properties including the future Bedford Park tract, which he sold to George Caulfield in November 1869. In 1872, Caufield sold the twenty-five acre Bedford Park tract to three partners: the dry goods merchant Horace B. Claflin, the realtor Daniel R. Kendall, and Charles L. Anthony. After Anthony's death in 1874, his share passed to his partners. They established a corporation, the Twenty-Fourth Ward Real Estate Association, to develop the property. Streets were laid out and the blocks were subdivided into house lots, but buildings were not erected until the early 1880s/ The boundaries of the subdivision were Webster Avenue (aka Berrian Avenue) on the east, Brook Street (now East Mosholu Parkway South) on the north, Bainbridge Avenue (aka Williamsbridge Avenue) on the west, and Southern Boulevard on the south. Southern Boulevard, opened in 1882, was a wide boulevard extending from Jerome Avenue near Jerome Park to East 133 Street and Third Avenue in the South Bronx, where it opened on to the Harlem River (now Third Avenue) Bridge to Manhattan. With this transportation link in place, the developers erected about a dozen houses. The developers then persuaded the New York & Harlem River Railroad Company to run a few commuter trains each day to the Jerome Park railroad station which was located just to the west of the subdivision. In 1884, newspaper accounts extolled the virtues of the new development which had been named Bedford Park after the renowned London suburb. The Bronx development was intended for "New Yorkers of moderate means" who would be given "a chance to become owners of comfortable homes on easy terms.'** Like its English counterpart, Bedford Park was built up with "pretty cottages" in the Queen Anne style, planned to be "convenient and comfortable" as well as "unique" in design. The houses ranged in size from cotta

northern suburbs timber flooring
northern suburbs timber flooring
Two Cemeteries from Bristol's Northern Suburbs (Bristol and Gloucestershire Archaeological Report)
Two reports are published in this volume: excavations in 2004 at Henbury School, Bristol (by Derek Evans, Neil Holbrook and E.R. McSloy) and excavations in 2005 at Hewlett Packard, Filton, South Gloucestershire (by Kate Cullen, Neil Holbrook, Martin Watts, Anwen Caffell and Malin Holst). Dealing with the dead is a complex and emotive issue. Our awareness of death, and how we treat our dead is central to our humanity, and respect for the mortal remains of the dead is an underlying principle in modern society. Often archaeologists are responsible for the excavation, storage and ultimate redeposition of human remains, and a code of practice aiming at respecting the wishes of the dead and their relatives/community is very important. This publication presents the results of two cemetery excavations, with what is hopefully a balanced and respectful reporting of the human remains and the information that they can provide. Despite their difference in date, the two skeletons at Henbury and Fitton have some common elements. Both feature a predominant (though differing) burial attitude and grave orientation, and neither were rich in grave goods. The juxtaposition of some graves and (rare) intercutting of others at both cemeteries may well reflect family associations. That such attributes also relate to modern burial grounds reminds us of the very human nature of this type of archaeological resource. It is not just the information value of human remains that makes their study so rewarding but also their associative value, enabling us to identify more closely with our forebears, both in life and in death.

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