DOME GLASS LAMP SHADE : DOME GLASS

Dome glass lamp shade : Market umbrella replacement canopies.

Dome Glass Lamp Shade


dome glass lamp shade
    lamp shade
  • A cover for a lamp, used to soften or direct its light
  • lampshade: a protective ornamental shade used to screen a light bulb from direct view
  • The shade serves the important function of blocking the glare from a light bulb and is usually the most decorative part of a lamp. The lamp shade can be made of glass, fabric, metal, or other more creative materials.
  • A lampshade is a fixture that covers the lightbulb on a lamp to diffuse the light it emits. Conical, cylindrical and other forms on floor-, desk- or table top-mounted as well as suspended lamp models are the most common and are made in a wide range of materials.
    glass
  • a container for holding liquids while drinking
  • A hard, brittle substance, typically transparent or translucent, made by fusing sand with soda, lime, and sometimes other ingredients and cooling rapidly. It is used to make windows, drinking containers, and other articles
  • a brittle transparent solid with irregular atomic structure
  • furnish with glass; "glass the windows"
  • Any similar substance that has solidified from a molten state without crystallizing
  • A thing made from, or partly from, glass, in particular
    dome
  • (of stratified rock or a surface) Become rounded in formation; swell
  • a stadium that has a roof
  • attic: informal terms for a human head
  • Cover with or shape as a dome
  • a concave shape whose distinguishing characteristic is that the concavity faces downward
dome glass lamp shade - Sea Gull
Sea Gull Lighting 94343-645 Ambiance Transitions Miniature Dome Shade, Cased White Rhapsody Glass
Sea Gull Lighting 94343-645 Ambiance Transitions Miniature Dome Shade, Cased White Rhapsody Glass
94343-645 - SeaGull Lighting Cased White Rhapsody Glass
Transitions Glass Shade in OpalCased Etched Finish.

Basic Dimensions
Height: 2 5/8"
Diameter: 3 1/16"

Glass Dimensions
Glass Diameter: 3 1/16"
Fitter Diameter: 1"

Energy Efficiency:
Dark Sky Certified: No
Energy Star Certified: No
Title 24 Certified: No

ADA Compliant: No

Materials:
Shade - Glass - Opal Cased Etched
Finish: Opal Cased Etched


Product Notes:
Ambiance Lighting Systems
Due to the variation and complexity of parts of the Sea Gull range, please refer to our SeaGull Information section for additional product resources.

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Great Synagogue, Sydney
Great Synagogue, Sydney
The Maitland Mercury & Hunter River General Advertiser (NSW: 1843-1893), Thursday 7 March 1878, page 6. (From the Evening News of Monday.) The new Jewish Synagogue, school, and beadle's residence are now completed. The site upon which the building stands faces Elizabeth and Castlereagh streets, next to the Oddfellows Hall. The whole of the site is built upon, with the exception of a small space between the synagogue and school, which forms a yard. The frontage is 64 foot by a depth of 140 feet, running through from street to street. The style of the front to Elizabeth street is Byzantine, freely treated, with a slight introduction of the gothic spirit The material of this grand front is built of freestone, from Pyrmont quarries, and is strikingly imposing. The frontage is divided into three features, the main and central one being flanked by two square towers, with octagonal turrets springing from the angles; and these with towers are terminated by domed tabernacles, finishing with richly carved finials with crockets, &c. The centre feature is the gable terminating the nave of the building eastward. The principal entrance to the Synagogue is under a spacious porch, supported by beautifully carved columns enriched foliated caps. The arches are moulded and relieved by carved work. On either side of the porch are entrance doors under towers leading to Synagogue, and likewise doors to staircases of gallery for the special use of the ladies. At the back of porch there are seven rich windows well and effectively treated, and likewise relieved with carving. Over this entrance there is a magnificent wheel window, of exquisite design and treatment, richly carved and moulded, recessed under magnificent moulded and carved arch supported on triplet columns, which are also enriched with foliated caps. The two square towers with octagonal turrets at the angles, are finished with domed roofs of [siline?]. These flank the central features, causing a beautiful contrast, at the same time being in keeping with the front, but only more simply treated, so us to produce that artistic development, which architecture exhibits when properly put forth; presenting, as a good picture does, that light and shade which causes it to speak, and earns that admiration which stamps the same as grand and beautiful. The interior, though not decorated to the extent intended by the architect, yet nevertheless deserves, for the simplicity of its treatment, volumes of praise. The inside is divided into a centre or nave, and lateral aisles of six bays in length. On the ground floor the seats are arranged to face north and south, leaving a centre space unoccupied by sittings throughout the whole length of space up to seats. At the western end of the nave, and under a lofty moulded and magnificently enriched arch, supported by a group of columns, is placed the Ark, which, to briefly mention, is an extremely elaborate and well-designed feature. A flight of steps leads to the floor, which is formed with elaborately-designed mosaics with marble insignia or margins, with balustrading on each side. The east end of the synagogue gallery floor has one large moulded and cusped arch, forming board room, which is divided from gallery. The columns of nave supporting the clerestory are 27 feet 3 inches high, surmounted by cusped arches, with pointed labels, the spandrils of which are richly ornamented with scroll foliage springing from central ornament. The arches carry thirty-six arch windows, which can be opened to any degree. The ceilings are semi groined, and pannelled [sic] with enriched bosses at interactions of same. The ceilings of galleries are coved [?], and divided into bays, with rich centre pieces. The windows throughout are glazed with rich ornamental glass of beautiful design, in keeping with the design of building, and form one of the pleasing features of the building. The whole of the building is beautifully lighted by 11 corona lights suspended from richly designed cast iron brackets, from clerestory walls; likewise the galleries and other portions of building of Synagogue with fittings of magnificent design and manufacture, coming from one of the principal wrought iron and brass workers in Philadelphia, and have been made to special order and design by the architect. They consist of highly polished brass worked up to appearance of polished steel, complete with beautiful glasses, and are on a scale of magnificence and grandeur seldom or ever soon in the colonies. The interior has been treated with artistic and architectural judgment combined, which causes eulogies of the highest kind to be poured upon the head of the architect, who has certainly produced in architecture what the skilled artist does in painting. The fittings, such as the seatings of both ground and gallery floors, are of cedar and Huon pine polished, with every convenience for each sitting. This consists of a box with lock and key for the gentleman. The divisions are fo
First Christian Church
First Christian Church
Often called one of Tulsa's top tourist attractions - Tulsa architect John Brooks Walton considers the dome a "must-see" artwork - the sanctuary actually represents the third home for Tulsa's original Disciples of Christ congregation. Started in 1902 by the newly arrived Marshall family from Missouri, the flock first gathered at their farm around what is now Fourth Street and Denver Avenue. In 1903 they built their first sanctuary, a simple cottage with a bell tower steeple. "All the other churches held early services so that they could come and participate in the new church," Gray said, sharing a tale of the founding. As was tradition at the time, the first offering was intended to pay off the note on the building. "They passed the plates twice without getting enough money," said Gray, retelling the story, "so then they closed the doors and passed the plates again, and on the third try they made it." Although that Second and Boulder facility could hold about 250, Gray said the congregation soon outgrew it and built a 1910 structure twice its size at Fourth and Boulder, featuring a large dome in its center. But as World War I started, that building also proved inadequate for the expanding church, spurring plans for today's landmark. Completed in 1920 from designs by architects Van Slyke and Woodruff of Fort Worth, at an estimated cost of $250,000, the 1,200- seat sanctuary's ornate plaster interior featured a multitude of stained-glass fixtures around the walls and doors, all linked to the classic dome by several uniform shades of brown and green, repeated images of Easter lilies, cherub wings and the cross of Christ. Sitting 45 feet off the floor, that dome not only helped light the room, but drove a ventilation system that used shafts under the solid concrete foundation and support structure to cool and recycle the atmosphere. The centerpiece of the dome, which by itself rose six feet, could be elevated another three feet to help hot air escape. Gray said second-floor windows around the balcony also had removable pieces that could be replaced by louvers and fans to create breezes. "In those days before air conditioning, that could lower temperatures in the sanctuary by 10 to 15 degrees," said Gray. Many elements of that structure changed over the years. Leaking problems forced the church to seal in the giant dome during the 1930s, lighting the stained glass with electric lamps. That lasted until 2001, when Gray oversaw a skylight restoration by Nosak Roofing. Continued growth led First Christian to add an education building, Memorial Chapel, and then an annex that connected the sanctuary to the rest of the structures. Gray estimates the four buildings total about 50,000 square feet. In 1966 the church finished a sanctuary renovation that extended the stage, installed a new Wicks organ with more than 4,000 pipes, took out the choir loft and replaced several plaster features with walnut paneling. Gray said many of those steps came at the expense of seating, which was reduced to about 900. He said 35 stained- glass treasures also were removed, which church members still intend to replace when possible. "It's a long-term project," said Gray, one that comes with high overhead. Just replacing one of the lost front-door pieces could cost up to $6,000. "We always have to balance whether that money would be better spent on stained glass or on ministry. And of course, there's an obvious conclusion." About once a month, Kevin Gray takes tour groups through downtown Tulsa's First Christian Church. They're drawn by the four green domes atop walls of cut Indiana limestone, a classical Greek structure graced with a Corinthian entrance. But what really moves visitors is the large bowl of stained glass lining the interior of the centerpiece dome. Lit by natural light, Gray said the skylight provides awe-inspiring shifts of illumination through the arched chamber. "It's just fascinating to sit in here when there are clouds and watch the sunlight shift across this room," said Gray, archivist for the church. "For insurance purposes, that dome is valued at $1 million." Often called one of Tulsa's top tourist attractions - Tulsa architect John Brooks Walton considers the dome a "must-see" artwork - the sanctuary actually represents the third home for Tulsa's original Disciples of Christ congregation. Started in 1902 by the newly arrived Marshall family from Missouri, the flock first gathered at their farm around what is now Fourth Street and Denver Avenue. In 1903 they built their first sanctuary, a simple cottage with a bell tower steeple. "All the other churches held early services so that they could come and participate in the new church," Gray said, sharing a tale of the founding. As was tradition at the time, the first offering was intended to pay off the note on the building. "They passe

dome glass lamp shade
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