MARINE EQUIPMENT MANUFACTURERS - EQUIPMENT MANUFACTURERS

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Marine Equipment Manufacturers


marine equipment manufacturers
    manufacturers
  • A person or company that makes goods for sale
  • (manufacture) industry: the organized action of making of goods and services for sale; "American industry is making increased use of computers to control production"
  • (manufacture) create or produce in a mechanical way; "This novelist has been manufacturing his books following his initial success"
  • (manufacture) put together out of artificial or natural components or parts; "the company fabricates plastic chairs"; "They manufacture small toys"; He manufactured a popular cereal"
    equipment
  • an instrumentality needed for an undertaking or to perform a service
  • The necessary items for a particular purpose
  • The process of supplying someone or something with such necessary items
  • A tool is a device that can be used to produce or achieve something, but that is not consumed in the process. Colloquially a tool can also be a procedure or process used for a specific purpose.
  • The act of equipping, or the state of being equipped, as for a voyage or expedition; Whatever is used in equipping; necessaries for an expedition or voyage; the collective designation for the articles comprising an outfit; equipage; as, a railroad equipment (locomotives, cars, etc.
  • Mental resources
    marine
  • of or relating to the sea; "marine explorations"
  • Of, found in, or produced by the sea
  • Of or relating to shipping or naval matters
  • (of artists or painting) Depicting scenes at sea
  • a soldier who serves both on shipboard and on land
  • a member of the United States Marine Corps
marine equipment manufacturers - The 2009-2014
The 2009-2014 World Outlook for Product Finishes for Original Equipment Manufacturers Excluding Marine Coatings
The 2009-2014 World Outlook for Product Finishes for Original Equipment Manufacturers Excluding Marine Coatings
This econometric study covers the world outlook for product finishes for original equipment manufacturers excluding marine coatings across more than 200 countries. For each year reported, estimates are given for the latent demand, or potential industry earnings (P.I.E.), for the country in question (in millions of U.S. dollars), the percent share the country is of the region and of the globe. These comparative benchmarks allow the reader to quickly gauge a country vis-a-vis others. Using econometric models which project fundamental economic dynamics within each country and across countries, latent demand estimates are created. This report does not discuss the specific players in the market serving the latent demand, nor specific details at the product level. The study also does not consider short-term cyclicalities that might affect realized sales. The study, therefore, is strategic in nature, taking an aggregate and long-run view, irrespective of the players or products involved. This study does not report actual sales data (which are simply unavailable, in a comparable or consistent manner in virtually all of the 230 countries of the world). This study gives, however, my estimates for the worldwide latent demand, or the P.I.E., for product finishes for original equipment manufacturers excluding marine coatings. It also shows how the P.I.E. is divided across the world's regional and national markets. For each country, I also show my estimates of how the P.I.E. grows over time (positive or negative growth). In order to make these estimates, a multi-stage methodology was employed that is often taught in courses on international strategic planning at graduate schools of business.

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MARINE PBJ-1J "DEVIL DOG"
MARINE PBJ-1J "DEVIL DOG"
Not many people know that the US Marine Corps flew bombers in WWII. One of the missions of the Devil Dog Squadron is to keep that piece of history alive. PBJs came about by chance. In 1943, North American, the B-25's manufacturer, produced more B-25s than the Army Air Corp could use. Approximately 800 of the airplanes were offered to the US Navy. Although the famous Doolittle Raid was a successful carrier launched formation of B-25s, the Navy had little use for the extra airplanes. They were too large for regular carrier duty. The US Marine Corps, however, was looking for a medium bomber. They agreed to take the B-25s and use them for "night heckling", anti-shipping missions or close air support of beachheads and landings. Taking the unwanted equipment was nothing new for the Marines, they often received obsolete or surplus equipment from the Army or Navy. The Marines designated the B-25s "PBJ". PB indicates Patrol Bomber and the J is an alpha-code designating the manufacturer, North American Aviation (PBJ does not mean Peanut Butter and Jelly). The Marines were innovative in customizing the PBJs for the jobs they faced. As most of the missions were performed at low altitude, there was not much need for the glass nose/bombardier position. It was replaced with a solid nose and armed with up to 8 - .50 caliber machine guns, or in some versions, a 75mm cannon. 9 PBJ squadrons made it overseas before the war ended in the Pacific. 26 PBJs were lost in combat and 19 were lost in operational accidents while in a combat zone. The Devil Dog represents a PBJ-1J (the second J designates the model) of the VMB 612 squadron. There were 10,000 B-25 Mitchells built during WWII. Today, there are less than 100 still in existence and less than 45 of these are in flying condition. By the way, this aircraft was produced at the North American's Fairfax Airport plant in Kansas City, Kansas.

marine equipment manufacturers
marine equipment manufacturers
The 2006-2011 World Outlook for Product Finishes for Original Equipment Manufacturers Excluding Marine Coatings
WHAT IS LATENT DEMAND AND THE P.I.E.?

The concept of latent demand is rather subtle. The term latent typically refers to something that is dormant, not observable, or not yet realized. Demand is the notion of an economic quantity that a target population or market requires under different assumptions of price, quality, and distribution, among other factors. Latent demand, therefore, is commonly defined by economists as the industry earnings of a market when that market becomes accessible and attractive to serve by competing firms. It is a measure, therefore, of potential industry earnings (P.I.E.) or total revenues (not profit) if a market is served in an efficient manner. It is typically expressed as the total revenues potentially extracted by firms. The “market” is defined at a given level in the value chain. There can be latent demand at the retail level, at the wholesale level, the manufacturing level, and the raw materials level (the P.I.E. of higher levels of the value chain being always smaller than the P.I.E. of levels at lower levels of the same value chain, assuming all levels maintain minimum profitability).

The latent demand for product finishes for original equipment manufacturers excluding marine coatings is not actual or historic sales. Nor is latent demand future sales. In fact, latent demand can be lower either lower or higher than actual sales if a market is inefficient (i.e., not representative of relatively competitive levels). Inefficiencies arise from a number of factors, including the lack of international openness, cultural barriers to consumption, regulations, and cartel-like behavior on the part of firms. In general, however, latent demand is typically larger than actual sales in a country market.

For reasons discussed later, this report does not consider the notion of “unit quantities”, only total latent revenues (i.e., a calculation of price times quantity is never made, though one is impli

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