ELECTRONIC MEASURING WHEEL - ELECTRONIC MEASURING

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Electronic Measuring Wheel


electronic measuring wheel
    measuring wheel
  • A piece of field equipment designed to measure distances; generally composed of a small wheel and calibrated meter mounted on the end of a handle
    electronic
  • Of or relating to electronics
  • Electronic is the self-titled debut album by British supergroup Electronic, formed by Bernard Sumner and Johnny Marr. It was first released in May 1991 (see 1991 in music) on the Factory label, and reissued in remastered form in 1994 by Parlophone after Factory collapsed.
  • (of a device) Having or operating with the aid of many small components, esp. microchips and transistors, that control and direct an electric current
  • (of music) Produced by electronic instruments
  • Electronic were an alternative dance group formed by New Order singer and guitarist Bernard Sumner and ex-Smiths guitarist Johnny Marr.
  • of or relating to electronics; concerned with or using devices that operate on principles governing the behavior of electrons; "electronic devices"
electronic measuring wheel - CST/Berger 31-04-P
CST/Berger 31-04-P Measuring Wheels, 4" (97mm) Single ABS, No counter
CST/Berger 31-04-P Measuring Wheels, 4" (97mm) Single ABS, No counter
Measuring Wheels, 4" (97mm) Single ABS, No counter. Accurate for all applications--precision manufacturing assures high reliability. Built strong to last; yet lightweight. Safety yellow color; Sealed housing prevents contamination. Offset reset switch. No more accidental resetting of counter. Full-view display for operator ease and accurate reading of distance. Our new line of quality measuring wheels meets a host of your measuring needs, outdoors and indoors. Unique collapsible handle allows for easy storage and transport.

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CADILLAC Seville
CADILLAC Seville
Initially based on the rear-wheel drive X-body platform that underpinned the Chevrolet Nova (a unibody with a bolt-on subframe — this layout was common with both GM X and F bodies), the Seville's unibody and chassis were extensively re-engineered and upgraded from that humble origin and it was awarded the unique designation of "K-body". Cadillac stylists added a crisp, angular body that set the tone for GM styling for the next decade, along with a wide-track stance that gave the car a substantial, premium appearance. A wide chrome grille flanked by quad rectangular headlamps with narrow parking and signal lamps just below filled the header panel, while small wrap-around rectangular tail lamps placed at the outmost corners of the rear gave the appearance of a lower, leaner, and wider car. The wrap-around taillights might have came from a design sketch of a Coupe DeVille concept which was rejected (the concept can be seen in the March 2008 issue of Collectible Automobile detailing the 1977 GM full-size cars). Seville engineers chose the X-body platform instead of the German Opel Diplomat in response to GM's budget restrictions — GM executives felt that reengineering a German Opel would be more costly than the corporate X-car. Another proposal during the development of the Seville was a front-wheel drive layout similar to the Cadillac Eldorado. This proposal also met with budget concerns since the transaxle used for the Eldorado was produced on a limited basis solely for E-body (Eldorado/Toronado) production, alongside the GMC motorhome of the mid-1970s (which has a derivative of the E-platform drivetrain). This was the first time Cadillac began engineering one of its vehicles based on components previously used in a Chevrolet model. Introduced in mid-1975 and billed as the new "internationally-sized" Cadillac, the Seville was almost 1,000 lb (450 kg) lighter than the hulking Deville; nimble, easy to park, attractive and loaded with the full complement of Cadillac gadgets. More expensive than every other Cadillac model at US$12,479, the Seville was a smash hit, and spawned several imitators, such as the less-than-successful Lincoln Versailles, and later the Chrysler LeBaron/Fifth Avenue. Early Sevilles produced between April 1975 (a total of 16,355) to the close of the 1976 model year were the first Cadillacs to use the Chevrolet passenger car wheel bolt pattern (5 lugs with a 4.75 in (121 mm) bolt circle; the 2003-present XLR also uses the Chevrolet pattern). The first Sevilles shared only a strict minority of components with the engineering starting point, the GM X-Body. The rear drums measured 11 in (280 mm) and were similar to the ones used with the Chevrolet Nova 9C1 (police option) and A-body (Chevelle, Cutlass, Regal, LeMans) intermediate station wagons. Starting with the 1977 model year, production Sevilles used the larger 5 lug — 5 inch bolt circle common to full-size Cadillacs, Buicks, Oldsmobiles, Pontiacs, and 1/2 ton Chevrolet/GMC light trucks and vans. It also received rear disc brakes, a design which would surface a year later as an option on the F-body Pontiac Trans Am. Under the hood went an Oldsmobile-sourced 350 in? (5.7L) V8, fitted with Bendix/Bosch electronically controlled fuel injection. This system gave the Seville smooth drivability and performance that was usually lacking in other domestic cars of this early emissions control era. Power output was 180 hp, and performance was restrained with the 60 mph (97 km/h) sprint taking 11.5 seconds. A diesel 350 in?(5.7 L) LF9 V8 was added in 1978, but that engine was known to be poor in both performance and reliability. A unique optional feature available only during the 1979 model year was the Cadillac Trip Computer. This option offered an electronic readout for the speedometer and remaining fuel which replaced the standard needle-type gauges. It also included a host of calculations available at the touch of a button on a small panel located just to the right of the steering wheel. These included miles to empty, miles per gallon, and a destination arrival time, which needed to be programmed by the driver, to estimate arrival time based on miles remaining. This system predated Lincoln's system by one year. A digital instrument cluster was available on the Seville and Eldorado again in their 1981 through 1985 configurations, though the "Trip Computer" was no longer available. This option added US$920 to the price of Seville in 1979. The Seville Cadillac was manufactured in Iran under the brand name of "Cadillac Iran" during 1970s and 1980s, by Pars Khodro, which was known as "Iran General Motors" in 1970s.
Honda B20 HP and Torque, T4 Setup
Honda B20 HP and Torque, T4 Setup
This is my measured road hp and torque for the T4 setup. Multiply this data by a factor of 1.25 to compare with typical chassis dyno numbers. Just because a chassis dyno reports whp doesn't mean it is whp (read explanation below). Doesn't really matter if you consistently use the same dyno. Only the dyno queens care. Data scatter is due to accelerometer noise (electronic and mechanical background). Manifold pressure was 1.90 BAR at 5300 rpm, 2.15 BAR at peak torque and 2.25 BAR at peak hp (18 psi boost). Engine is a sleeved Honda B20 (84 x 89 mm) with stock LS cams installed at 109 Int LCA x 117 Exh LCA (eventually went to 109 x 109 for a few more hp) and modified P75 head. It still amazes me that this engine makes peak hp at 7300 rpm with a cam duration of only 192 degrees at 0.050 inch valve lift. T4 setup is a P trim turbine with an 0.58 AR on-center housing and a T04e-50 compressor How did I conclude that a factor of 1.25 is necessary to compare this data to typical chassis dyno figures? By normalizing reported (on Honda-Tech) B-series Honda torque data to BMEP at 1 BAR. The non-vtec engines (42 reported) average 1.14 ft-lb/in^3 at 1 BAR. The vtec engines (27 reported) average 1.23 ft-lb/in^3 at 1 BAR. My data normalizes to 0.91 ft-lb/in^3 at 1 BAR. My engine is non-vtec so 1.14/0.91 = 1.25 and therefore this engine should produce 375 whp at 18 psi and 295 ft-lb on a typical chassis dyno. Not bad in a 1960 lb VW (plus driver) which hooks up with rear wheel drive and 63% rear weight bias. I suspect the reason for the vtec engines having greater BMEP is the greater cam duration (stock US profiles with up to 240 deg @ 0.050 inch) the vtec lobe provides. Of course the large duration is a double-edge sword requiring a big turbine to achieve low exhaust pressure thereby limiting reversion. As a result, shift recovery is terrible with the larger duration (need to shift under WOT). Finally, you might note that my torque curve rolls off more quickly than typically seen on a chassis dyno. This is because the chassis dyno embellishes the reported torque with an inertia correction factor. My reported engine torque is what got to the road, nothing more. I have since become even more conservative and have revised the correction for aero losses. Measured peak torque is nearly the same but peak power has been reduced about 7% to 280 hp at 18 psi boost. Note that the T3 setup makes 270 hp at 16 psi even though the exhaust pressure is much higher.

electronic measuring wheel
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