FIRST UP CANOPY SIDE WALL. CANOPY SIDE WALL

FIRST UP CANOPY SIDE WALL. CANOPY FOR BEACH.

First Up Canopy Side Wall


first up canopy side wall
    side wall
  • A wall forming the side of a structure or room
  • The side of a tire, typically marked or colored distinctively
  • A tire with distinctively colored sidewalls
  • (Side-walls) Where a vertical roof plane meets a vertical wall. The sides of dormers, etc.
  • Smooth part of the tire between the bead and the tread. Typically contains the writing.
  • The exterior wall on either side of a unit.
    first up
  • The first run a horse has in a new campaign or preparation, usually after having a spell.
  • at the first try or attempt: e.g., I missed the target first up, but I hit it every other time.
  • A horse returning to the races from a spell is said to be first up. If that horse wins its first race it is referred to as first up victory, however very few horses are fit enough to win their first race after spelling.
    canopy
  • the transparent covering of an aircraft cockpit
  • Cover or provide with a canopy
  • cover with a canopy
  • the umbrellalike part of a parachute that fills with air

45 East 66th Street Building
45 East 66th Street Building
45 East 66th Street, Upper East Side, Manhattan, New York City, New York, United States The striking apartment house- at 45 East 66th Street stands at the corner of 66th Street and Madison Avenue and Is richly detailed with a profusion of Gothic ornament. The building creates a picturesque and imposing effect reminiscent of the neo-French Renaissance style which often employed Gothic detail. Executed in brick with terra-cotta trim, from the designs of the architectural firm of Harde & Short, this handsome apartment building with its distinctive corner tower was, when It was erected in 1906-08, among the earliest of Its type to be constructed In the city. During the first decade of the 20th century, luxurious apartment houses gradually began to replace the opulent private residences of affluent New Yorkers who, for both economic and practical reasons, came to prefer apartment-styIe urban living. The convenience of apartment life was noted in many periodicals of the time and was praised by the architect, Lafayette A. Go Id stone, writing in Architecture (1918): He [the apartment dweller] can be entirely Isolated and experience the joy of living 100 to 200 feet In the air, above the noise and dust of the street, and if he desires to travel need only dismiss his help and latch the front door, with none of the dreaded discomfort of closing up a huge house. As early as 1884, The Dakota, one of the most impressive of the early luxury apartment buildings, had been constructed on 72nd Street and Central Park West. A number of elegant apartment houses were subsequently erected along Central Park West; however, construction of large deluxe apartment buildings along the fashionable streets of the Upper East Side did not occur until slightly Iater. At the time that 45 East 66th Street was built, the surrounding neighborhood was characterized by low scale rowhouses. Only a few apartment buildings, such as Charles Piatt's neo-ltalian. Renaissance design at 131-35 East 66th Street (1905-07), stood nearby. After the construction of 45 East 66th Street, a number of elegant apartment houses were erected In this part of the Upper East Side. In 1909, the Verona was erected at 64th Street and Madison Avenue and In 1912, a large apartment house was built at 66th Street and Park Avenue. The apartment buildings of the early 20th-century were designed by many of the most prestigious architects of the day and elegantly detailed in a wide variety of styles, including the neo-Gothic, neo-Renaissance and Trench Beaux-Arts. The use of elaborate architectural ornament on the exterior of the building symbolized the grandeur and luxury of the style of living within. THE ARCHITECTS The architectural firm of Harde & Short was responsible for many deluxe apartment houses throughout the city. Several of these buildings still stand today and are among the most distinguished examples of' this early type of apartment design. Herbert Spencer Harde (1873-1958) studied architecture in London,* Returning to New York, Harde designed a number of tenement houses at the turn of the century. Between 1898 and 1900 he worked with both James I. Ware Associates and Ralph Townsend on tenements located on the Upper West Side. Harde was listed as the owner of two of these properties. One of the earliest references to the architect, Richard Thomas Short, appears in I.N. Phelps Stokes' The Iconography of Manhattan Island ; it concerns a 1900 housing exhibition in which Short won first prize for his model tenement design. The first building known to have been designed by the firm of Harde & Short was "Red House," an apartment house erected in 1903-04 at 350 West 85th Street. Lavishly ornamented with features which recur in the later work of the firm, "Red House" still stands. The Gothic window detail of this building is quite similar to that used a few years later at 45 East 66th Street. In 1906, Charles f. Rogers, president of Parkview Real Estate Company, commissioned Harde & Short to design the apartment house at 45 East 66th Street. Completed two years later, the building oriqinally had two apartments per floor. The extensive use of laroe windows, combined with the exuberant terra-cotta Gothic detail, give 45 Fast 66th Street an unusually handsome appearance. One of the most distinctive features of this apartment house, its corner tower, recalls Parisian apartment buildings of the time and was repeated In another of the firm's impressive works, Alwyn Court. Erected In 1908-09, Alwyn Court, like 45 East 66th Street, Is magnificently ornamented with terra-cotta detail. A designated New York City Landmark, Alwyn Court was designed by Harde & Short In the neo-French Renaissance style and displays such characteristic features as the crowned salamander, the official symbol of Francois I. Alwyn Court was named for Alwyn Ball, Jr., a member of the syndicate responsible for the building as well as for another apart
45 East 66th Street Building
45 East 66th Street Building
Upper East Side, Manhattan, New York City, New York, United States. The striking apartment house- at 45 East 66th Street stands at the corner of 66th Street and Madison Avenue and Is richly detailed with a profusion of Gothic ornament. The building creates a picturesque and imposing effect reminiscent of the neo-French Renaissance style which often employed Gothic detail. Executed in brick with terra-cotta trim, from the designs of the architectural firm of Harde & Short, this handsome apartment building with its distinctive corner tower was, when It was erected in 1906-08, among the earliest of Its type to be constructed In the city. During the first decade of the 20th century, luxurious apartment houses gradually began to replace the opulent private residences of affluent New Yorkers who, for both economic and practical reasons, came to prefer apartment-styIe urban living. The convenience of apartment life was noted in many periodicals of the time and was praised by the architect, Lafayette A. Go Id stone, writing in Architecture (1918): He [the apartment dweller] can be entirely Isolated and experience the joy of living 100 to 200 feet In the air, above the noise and dust of the street, and if he desires to travel need only dismiss his help and latch the front door, with none of the dreaded discomfort of closing up a huge house. As early as 1884, The Dakota, one of the most impressive of the early luxury apartment buildings, had been constructed on 72nd Street and Central Park West. A number of elegant apartment houses were subsequently erected along Central Park West; however, construction of large deluxe apartment buildings along the fashionable streets of the Upper East Side did not occur until slightly Iater. At the time that 45 East 66th Street was built, the surrounding neighborhood was characterized by low scale rowhouses. Only a few apartment buildings, such as Charles Piatt's neo-ltalian. Renaissance design at 131-35 East 66th Street (1905-07), stood nearby. After the construction of 45 East 66th Street, a number of elegant apartment houses were erected In this part of the Upper East Side. In 1909, the Verona was erected at 64th Street and Madison Avenue and In 1912, a large apartment house was built at 66th Street and Park Avenue. The apartment buildings of the early 20th-century were designed by many of the most prestigious architects of the day and elegantly detailed in a wide variety of styles, including the neo-Gothic, neo-Renaissance and Trench Beaux-Arts. The use of elaborate architectural ornament on the exterior of the building symbolized the grandeur and luxury of the style of living within. THE ARCHITECTS The architectural firm of Harde & Short was responsible for many deluxe apartment houses throughout the city. Several of these buildings still stand today and are among the most distinguished examples of' this early type of apartment design. Herbert Spencer Harde (1873-1958) studied architecture in London,* Returning to New York, Harde designed a number of tenement houses at the turn of the century. Between 1898 and 1900 he worked with both James I. Ware Associates and Ralph Townsend on tenements located on the Upper West Side. Harde was listed as the owner of two of these properties. One of the earliest references to the architect, Richard Thomas Short, appears in I.N. Phelps Stokes' The Iconography of Manhattan Island ; it concerns a 1900 housing exhibition in which Short won first prize for his model tenement design. The first building known to have been designed by the firm of Harde & Short was "Red House," an apartment house erected in 1903-04 at 350 West 85th Street. Lavishly ornamented with features which recur in the later work of the firm, "Red House" still stands. The Gothic window detail of this building is quite similar to that used a few years later at 45 East 66th Street. In 1906, Charles f. Rogers, president of Parkview Real Estate Company, commissioned Harde & Short to design the apartment house at 45 East 66th Street. Completed two years later, the building oriqinally had two apartments per floor. The extensive use of laroe windows, combined with the exuberant terra-cotta Gothic detail, give 45 Fast 66th Street an unusually handsome appearance. One of the most distinctive features of this apartment house, its corner tower, recalls Parisian apartment buildings of the time and was repeated In another of the firm's impressive works, Alwyn Court. Erected In 1908-09, Alwyn Court, like 45 East 66th Street, Is magnificently ornamented with terra-cotta detail. A designated New York City Landmark, Alwyn Court was designed by Harde & Short In the neo-French Renaissance style and displays such characteristic features as the crowned salamander, the official symbol of Francois I. Alwyn Court was named for Alwyn Ball, Jr., a member of the syndicate responsible for the building as well as for another apartment house by Harde &

first up canopy side wall
See also:
upholstery drapery fabrics
ceiling drapings
uv shade cloth
2 faux wood window blinds
awning fabric material
sunroom shades
fibreglass ute canopies
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