TAMIL BOY BABY NAMES WITH MEANING : NAMES WITH MEANING

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Tamil Boy Baby Names With Meaning


tamil boy baby names with meaning
    baby names
  • The most popular given names vary nationally, regionally, and culturally. Lists of widely used given names can consist of those most often bestowed upon infants born within the last year, thus reflecting the current naming trends, or else be composed of the personal names occurring most within
    meaning
  • Intended to communicate something that is not directly expressed
  • meaning(a): rich in significance or implication; "a meaning look"
  • the message that is intended or expressed or signified; "what is the meaning of this sentence"; "the significance of a red traffic light"; "the signification of Chinese characters"; "the import of his announcement was ambiguous"
  • (means) how a result is obtained or an end is achieved; "a means of control"; "an example is the best agency of instruction"; "the true way to success"
    tamil
  • Tamil is a Dravidian language spoken predominantly by Tamil people of the Indian subcontinent. It has official status in the Indian state of Tamil Nadu and in the Indian union territory of Puducherry. Tamil is also an official language of Sri Lanka and Singapore.
  • The Dravidian language of the Tamils
  • a member of the mixed Dravidian and Caucasian people of southern India and Sri Lanka
  • of or relating to a speaker of the Tamil language or the language itself; "Tamil agglutinative phrases"
  • A member of a people inhabiting parts of southern India and Sri Lanka
    boy
  • male child: a youthful male person; "the baby was a boy"; "she made the boy brush his teeth every night"; "most soldiers are only boys in uniform"
  • son: a male human offspring; "their son became a famous judge"; "his boy is taller than he is"
  • a friendly informal reference to a grown man; "he likes to play golf with the boys"
  • Used to express strong feelings, esp. of excitement or admiration

Ganesha -Destroyer of Obtacles
Ganesha -Destroyer of Obtacles
Ganesha shot at home. Ganesha has many other titles and epithets, including Ganapati and Vigneshvara. The Hindu title of respect Shri (Sanskrit: ????; sri, also spelled Sri or Shree) is often added before his name. One popular way Ganesha is worshipped is by chanting a Ganesha Sahasranama, a litany of "a thousand names of Ganesha". Each name in the sahasranama conveys a different meaning and symbolises a different aspect of Ganesha. At least two different versions of the Ganesha Sahasranama exist; one version is drawn from the Ganesha Purana, a Hindu scripture venerating Ganesha.[17] The name Ganesha is a Sanskrit compound, joining the words gana (Sanskrit: ??; ga?a), meaning a group, multitude, or categorical system and isha (Sanskrit: ??; isa), meaning lord or master.[18] The word gana when associated with Ganesha is often taken to refer to the ganas, a troop of semi-divine beings that form part of the retinue of Shiva (IAST: Siva).[19] The term more generally means a category, class, community, association, or corporation.[20] Some commentators interpret the name "Lord of the Ganas" to mean "Lord of Hosts" or "Lord of created categories", such as the elements.[21] Ganapati (Sanskrit: ?????; ga?apati), a synonym for Ganesha, is a compound composed of ga?a, meaning "group", and pati, meaning "ruler" or "lord".[20] The Amarakosha,[22] an early Sanskrit lexicon, lists eight synonyms of Ganesha : Vinayaka, Vighnaraja (equivalent to Vignesha), Dvaimatura (one who has two mothers),[23] Ga?adhipa (equivalent to Ganapati and Ganesha), Ekadanta (one who has one tusk), Heramba, Lambodara (one who has a pot belly, or, literally, one who has a hanging belly), and Gajanana (IAST: gajanana) ; having the face of an elephant).[24] Vinayaka (Sanskrit: ??????; vinayaka) is a common name for Ganesha that appears in the Pura?as and in Buddhist Tantras.[25] This name is reflected in the naming of the eight famous Ganesha temples in Maharashtra known as the Ashtavinayak (a??avinayaka).[26] The names Vignesha (Sanskrit: ???????; vighnesa) and Vigneshvara (Sanskrit: ??????????; vighnesvara) (Lord of Obstacles)[11] refers to his primary function in Hindu mythology as the creator and remover of obstacles (vighna).[27] A prominent name for Ganesha in the Tamil language is Pille or Pillaiyar (Little Child).[28] A. K. Narain differentiates these terms by saying that pille means a "child" while pillaiyar means a "noble child". He adds that the words pallu, pella, and pell in the Dravidian family of languages signify "tooth or tusk of an elephant", but more generally "elephant".[29] Anita Raina Thapan notes that the root word pille in the name Pillaiyar might have originally meant "the young of the elephant", because the Pali word pillaka means "a young elephant" Source: Wikipedia Ganesha — the elephant-deity riding a mouse — has become one of the commonest mnemonics for anything associated with Hinduism. This not only suggests the importance of Ganesha, but also shows how popular and pervasive this deity is in the minds of the masses. The Lord of Success The son of Shiva and Parvati, Ganesha has an elephantine countenance with a curved trunk and big ears, and a huge pot-bellied body of a human being. He is the Lord of success and destroyer of evils and obstacles. He is also worshipped as the god of education, knowledge, wisdom and wealth. In fact, Ganesha is one of the five prime Hindu deities (Brahma, Vishnu, Shiva and Durga being the other four) whose idolatry is glorified as the panchayatana puja. Significance of the Ganesha Form Ganesha's head symbolizes the Atman or the soul, which is the ultimate supreme reality of human existence, and his human body signifies Maya or the earthly existence of human beings. The elephant head denotes wisdom and its trunk represents Om, the sound symbol of cosmic reality. In his upper right hand Ganesha holds a goad, which helps him propel mankind forward on the eternal path and remove obstacles from the way. The noose in Ganesha's left hand is a gentle implement to capture all difficulties. The broken tusk that Ganesha holds like a pen in his lower right hand is a symbol of sacrifice, which he broke for writing the Mahabharata. The rosary in his other hand suggests that the pursuit of knowledge should be continuous. The laddoo (sweet) he holds in his trunk indicates that one must discover the sweetness of the Atman. His fan-like ears convey that he is all ears to our petition. The snake that runs round his waist represents energy in all forms. And he is humble enough to ride the lowest of creatures, a mouse. How Ganesha Got His Head The story of the birth of this zoomorphic deity, as depicted in the Shiva Purana, goes like this: Once goddess Parvati, while bathing, created a boy out of the dirt of her body and assigned him the task of guardi
Mean Poppa Lean
Mean Poppa Lean
Mean Poppa Lean playing at the Pavilion Theatre 16/3/11 as part of Juice Radio's new music night

tamil boy baby names with meaning
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