WHOLE HOUSE FAN SHUTTER COVER. WHOLE HOUSE FAN

WHOLE HOUSE FAN SHUTTER COVER. FAUX VERTICAL BLINDS

Whole House Fan Shutter Cover


whole house fan shutter cover
    shutter
  • a mechanical device on a camera that opens and closes to control the time of a photographic exposure
  • Close the shutters of (a window or building)
  • Close (a business)
  • close with shutters; "We shuttered the window to keep the house cool"
  • a hinged blind for a window
    house
  • The people living in such a building; a household
  • A family or family lineage, esp. a noble or royal one; a dynasty
  • contain or cover; "This box houses the gears"
  • A building for human habitation, esp. one that is lived in by a family or small group of people
  • a dwelling that serves as living quarters for one or more families; "he has a house on Cape Cod"; "she felt she had to get out of the house"
  • firm: the members of a business organization that owns or operates one or more establishments; "he worked for a brokerage house"
    cover
  • screen: a covering that serves to conceal or shelter something; "a screen of trees afforded privacy"; "under cover of darkness"; "the brush provided a covert for game"; "the simplest concealment is to match perfectly the color of the background"
  • Scatter a layer of loose material over (a surface, esp. a floor), leaving it completely obscured
  • Put something such as a cloth or lid on top of or in front of (something) in order to protect or conceal it
  • Envelop in a layer of something, esp. dirt
  • provide with a covering or cause to be covered; "cover her face with a handkerchief"; "cover the child with a blanket"; "cover the grave with flowers"
  • blanket: bedding that keeps a person warm in bed; "he pulled the covers over his head and went to sleep"
    fan
  • strike out (a batter), (of a pitcher)
  • make (an emotion) fiercer; "fan hatred"
  • A person who has a strong interest in or admiration for a particular sport, art form, or famous person
  • a device for creating a current of air by movement of a surface or surfaces
whole house fan shutter cover - Battic Door
Battic Door Whole House Attic Ceiling Fan Shutter Seal Cover, Fits up to 36" X 48" Attic Fan Shutters
Battic Door Whole House Attic Ceiling Fan Shutter Seal Cover, Fits up to 36" X 48" Attic Fan Shutters
The BatticĀ© Door Whole House Attic Fan Ceiling Shutter Seal is an energy-saving insulating cover for Whole House Attic Fans. It reduces air-leakage through the whole house attic fan saving the homeowner heating and cooling loss and energy costs. The BatticĀ© Door Whole House Attic Fan Shutter Seal is installed over the ceiling shutter from the house side in the fall and removed in the spring. Attic access is not required! Simple to install - just velcro the cover into place. By reducing the amount of heat and moisture leaking into your attic, the severity of ice dams and attic mold is greatly reduced! Fits max 36" x 48" whole house attic fan ceiling shutters. Kit includes durable, attractive, non-toxic, white-colored, space-age foam, only ?" thick, yet has an R-value of R-8. The foam air seals and insulates the attic fan, stopping heating and cooling loss and air leaks. The insulation is a Class A/Class 1 fire rated foam with superior thermal performance. No fiberglass - no itching. Larger kits for 48x48" are larger also available.

75% (17)
363 and 369 Manor Road
363 and 369 Manor Road
Douglaston Historic District, Douglaston, Queens, New York City, New York, United States Style: English Cottage Stories: V/z Structure/material: Frame with brick veneer and clapboard siding Notable building features: Intersecting gabled roofs, covered with slate tiles; exposed brick chimney; bay window; covered entrance; original steel casement windows, some with shutters; raised, wood and glass sun porch above carport; basement garage, entered from Douglas Road, with replacement vehicle door. Alterations: Not apparent Related structure on lot: Clapboard shed with peaked roof; scalloped bargeboards. Notable site features: Flagstone walkways, brick retaining wall; mature trees; cobblestone driveway and curb. INTRODUCTION The Douglaston Historic District contains more than 600 houses set along landscaped streets on a mile-long peninsula extending into Little Neck Bay, at the northeastern edge of Queens adjoining Nassau County. Its history over the past four centuries ranges from a native American settlement to an eighteenth-century farm, a nineteenth-century estate called Douglas Manor, and an early twentieth-century planned suburb, also called Douglas Manor. The Douglaston Historic District encompasses the entire Douglas Manor suburban development, plus several contiguous blocks. Most of the houses in the proposed district date from the early- to mid-twentieth century, while a few survive from the nineteenth century, and one from the eighteenth century. The landscape includes many impressive and exotic specimen trees planted on the mid-nineteenth-century estate, as well as a great white oak, located at 233 Arleigh Road, believed to be 600 years old. Douglaston's location on a peninsula jutting into Flushing Bay at the eastern border of Queens County is an important factor in establishing the character of the district. The very early buildings surviving in the district include the c.1735 Van Wyck House, the c. 1819 Van Zandt manor house (expanded in the early twentieth century for use as the Douglaston Club), and the Greek Revival style c. 1848-50 Benjamin Allen House. Much of the landscaping, including the specimen trees, survives from the estate of Douglas Manor, established by George Douglas and maintained by his son William Douglas. Most of the houses in the historic district were built as part of the planned suburb of Douglas Manor, developed by the Rickert-Finlay Company, that was part of the residential redevelopment of the Borough of Queens following its creation and annexation to the City of Greater New York in 1898. A set of covenants devised by the Rickert-Finlay Company helped assure a carefully planned environment, including a shorefront held in common, winding streets following the topography of the peninsula, and single-family houses ranging in size from substantial mansions along Shore Road on the west to more modest cottages closer to Udalls Cove on the east. The houses of the historic district, which are representative of twentieth-century residential architecture, were designed in a variety of styles including the many variants of the Colonial Revival, many houses in the English manner incorporating Tudor Revival, English cottage, and Arts and Crafts motifs, as well as the Mediterranean Revival. In most cases, they were designed by local Queens architects, including over a dozen who lived in Douglaston itself. The district includes three houses of the Craftsman type pioneered by Gustav Stickley. Eight of the houses in the district were designed by Josephine Wright Chapman, one of America's earliest successful women architects, and they constitute an important body of her work. The Douglaston Historic District survives today as an important example of an early twentieth-century planned suburb adapted to the site of a nineteenth-century estate. The stylistically varied suburban residences, the distinctive topography, the landscaped setting, and the winding streets create a distinct sense of place and give the district its special character. HISTORICAL AND ARCHITECTURAL BACKGROUND OF THE DOUGLASTON HISTORIC DISTRICT Native American and Colonial antecedents The Native American presence on the Little Neck peninsula today known as Douglaston included the Matinecoc,1 one of a group on western Long Island linked by culture and language to others in the area surrounding Manhattan Island (including the Nayack, Marechkawieck, Canarsee, Rockaway, and Massapequa). A number of finds from those settlements have been identified at various sites on the peninsula.2 The Matinecoc, who fanned the peninsula and apparently also produced wampum, were summarily evicted in the 1660s by Thomas Hicks, later Judge Hicks, in what has been described as the only such seizure of property recorded in Flushing town records. In the 1930s, according to local histories, a Matinecoc burial ground was destroyed to make way for a widening of Northern Boulevard, and the remains reinterred in the cemet
361 Arleigh Road
361 Arleigh Road
Douglaston Historic District, Douglaston, Queens, New York City, New York, United States aka 240-57 Arleigh Road Borough of Queens Tax Map Block 8049, lot 38 Douglas Manor Section Four, Block 50, lots 64-67 Date: c.1940 Style: English Cottage Structure/material: Frame with brick veneer and clapboard siding Notable building features: Intersecting gabled roofs, covered with slate tiles; exposed brick chimney; bay window; covered entrance; original steel casement windows, some with shutters; raised, wood and glass sun porch above carport; basement garage, entered from Douglas Road, with replacement vehicle door. Notable site features: Flagstone walkways, brick retaining wall; mature trees; cobbelstone driveway and curb. INTRODUCTION The Douglaston Historic District contains more than 600 houses set along landscaped streets on a mile-long peninsula extending into Little Neck Bay, at the northeastern edge of Queens adjoining Nassau County. Its history over the past four centuries ranges from a native American settlement to an eighteenth-century farm, a nineteenth-century estate called Douglas Manor, and an early twentieth-century planned suburb, also called Douglas Manor. The Douglaston Historic District encompasses the entire Douglas Manor suburban development, plus several contiguous blocks. Most of the houses in the proposed district date from the early- to mid-twentieth century, while a few survive from the nineteenth century, and one from the eighteenth century. The landscape includes many impressive and exotic specimen trees planted on the mid-nineteenth-century estate, as well as a great white oak, located at 233 Arleigh Road, believed to be 600 years old. Douglaston's location on a peninsula jutting into Flushing Bay at the eastern border of Queens County is an important factor in establishing the character of the district. The very early buildings surviving in the district include the c.1735 Van Wyck House, the c. 1819 Van Zandt manor house (expanded in the early twentieth century for use as the Douglaston Club), and the Greek Revival style c. 1848-50 Benjamin Allen House. Much of the landscaping, including the specimen trees, survives from the estate of Douglas Manor, established by George Douglas and maintained by his son William Douglas. Most of the houses in the historic district were built as part of the planned suburb of Douglas Manor, developed by the Rickert-Finlay Company, that was part of the residential redevelopment of the Borough of Queens following its creation and annexation to the City of Greater New York in 1898. A set of covenants devised by the Rickert-Finlay Company helped assure a carefully planned environment, including a shorefront held in common, winding streets following the topography of the peninsula, and single-family houses ranging in size from substantial mansions along Shore Road on the west to more modest cottages closer to Udalls Cove on the east. The houses of the historic district, which are representative of twentieth-century residential architecture, were designed in a variety of styles including the many variants of the Colonial Revival, many houses in the English manner incorporating Tudor Revival, English cottage, and Arts and Crafts motifs, as well as the Mediterranean Revival. In most cases, they were designed by local Queens architects, including over a dozen who lived in Douglaston itself. The district includes three houses of the Craftsman type pioneered by Gustav Stickley. Eight of the houses in the district were designed by Josephine Wright Chapman, one of America's earliest successful women architects, and they constitute an important body of her work. The Douglaston Historic District survives today as an important example of an early twentieth-century planned suburb adapted to the site of a nineteenth-century estate. The stylistically varied suburban residences, the distinctive topography, the landscaped setting, and the winding streets create a distinct sense of place and give the district its special character. HISTORICAL AND ARCHITECTURAL BACKGROUND OF THE DOUGLASTON HISTORIC DISTRICT Native American and Colonial antecedents The Native American presence on the Little Neck peninsula today known as Douglaston included the Matinecoc,1 one of a group on western Long Island linked by culture and language to others in the area surrounding Manhattan Island (including the Nayack, Marechkawieck, Canarsee, Rockaway, and Massapequa). A number of finds from those settlements have been identified at various sites on the peninsula.2 The Matinecoc, who fanned the peninsula and apparently also produced wampum, were summarily evicted in the 1660s by Thomas Hicks, later Judge Hicks, in what has been described as the only such seizure of property recorded in Flushing town records. In the 1930s, according to local histories, a Matinecoc burial ground was destroyed to make way for a widening of Northern Boulevard, and the remains reinterred in the ce

whole house fan shutter cover
whole house fan shutter cover
Small Shutter Seal - Trim to Fit. Small size fits up to 3 x 4 ft shutters. See other listings for Medium (4 x 4 ft) and Large (5 x 4 ft).
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