ROMAN SHADE 35. ROMAN SHADE

ROMAN SHADE 35. HAMMOCK CANOPY

Roman Shade 35


roman shade 35
    roman shade
  • (Roman Shades) Drawn up from the bottom by means of cords and rings, these shades create horizontal folds when raised. A roman shade panel is flat when lowered and covers the window glass completely.
  • UpA fabric shade that folds up accordion-style from the bottom, usually operated by lift cord.
  • A tailored fabric window shade that folds sideways. Find
    35
  • thirty-five: being five more than thirty
  • 35 (thirty-five) is the natural number following 34 and preceding 36.
  • Year 35 (XXXV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.
roman shade 35 - Randa Auburn
Randa Auburn Bamboo Roman Shade - Free Shipping, 35x74
Randa Auburn Bamboo Roman Shade - Free Shipping, 35x74
Our beautiful Roman-style Bamboo shades can only be described as the sensible choice. Noted for their rich textures and beautiful colors they also help protect your home against penetrating heat and Winter air. Note: For inside mount, please order a shade that is smaller than the width of your window so that it fits inside your window or does not rub against the sides. It should be at least 1/4 of an inch smaller to ensure a proper fit. Not for outdoor use, it will mold in high humidity environment. Each shade comes with a Retro-fit kit recommended by the CPSC. This kit enables the removal of operating cords. For more information on Roman Shade safety go to windowcoverings.org.

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Glenelg 35 January 15 2010
Glenelg 35 January 15 2010
History of Glenelg In November, 1836, Colonel William Light found a safe anchorage on the eastern side of St. Vincent's Gulf at Holdfast Bay, about 11 km south-west of where central Adelaide is now situated. Glenelg was favoured by freshwater lagoons and shady trees, and on 28th December, 1836, Captain John Hindmarsh proclaimed His Majesty's Province of South Australia at the proclamation tree, later to be a much photographed bent eucalypt. Despite Glenelg's apparent attraction, Light moved inland to survey the site of Adelaide, and most settlers moved there in March, 1837. Glenelg's immediate function was as a port and sea-side resort. Surveyed land was sold there in March, 1839. Severances from existing councils created the Glenelg municipality on 27th August, 1855. A jetty was built in 1859. Glenelg's role as a port was strengthened when heavy cargo could be taken to Adelaide by the railway which opened in 1873. Goods yards and railway workshops became a source of local employment until about 1900 when Port Adelaide was developed. The Australian Handbook's description of Glenelg in 1904 was - ... a watering place and municipality, with post, money-order, savings bank and telegraph office, on Holdfast bay or the Patawalonga creek, 6 1/2 miles SSW. from Adelaide. It is in the county and police district of Adelaide, and electorate of Sturt. It is a favourite place of resort during the summer months. The hotels are Pier, Family, Jetty, Terminus, St. Leonard's, Berkshire, Globe, and Broadway. The places of worship are Episcopal (St. Peter's), Wesleyan, Roman Catholic (Our Lady of Victories), Congregational Church of Christ and Primitive Methodist. There is a Town Hall in which the Glenelg Institute (with 2,400 vols.) has accommodation, and there are also several relics of the early days. Has Masonic, Oddfellows, Foresters, Druids, and Rechabite sociedties. A State school and several private ones. Swimming baths. Two Government railways connect it with Adelaide, trains running each way about half-hourly. A fixed red light on an iron lighthouse - the lantern being 39 feet above high-water mark - is placed on the head of the jetty (which is 1,356 feet in length, with a depth of 11 feet of water at the outer end). It was off Glenelg, better known as Holdfast Bay, that H.M.S. Buffalo ahchored in 1836, when South Australia was proclaimed a British province by Governor Hindmarsh, under the historical "Old Gum Tree," which is situated about half a mile from the beach, and on the 18th June, 1887, young gum trees were planted around the old one to perpetuate its memory. Glenelg is supplied with gas and water. Agricultural district of sand, sandstone, and conglomerate formation. Area of municipality 560 acres, property of annual ratable value of 37,170 pounds. Population of the municipal district about 4,500. Between 1901 and 1932 the Glenelg municipality's boundaries were enlarged by severances from Marion and West Torrens Councils, to take in new housing estates. Large influxes of Summer visitors attracted foreshore improvements and tree planting. The Anzac Memorial Highway League, formed in 1917, succeeded in getting an improved road link to Adelaide, capitalising on motorised day trips to Glenelg. The railway was replaced by the Glenelg tram in 1929. The insular turn-of-the-century township gradually merged with metropolitan Adelaide as post-war housing filled in the Glenelg plains. In 1947 The Australian Blue Book described Glenelg as - The Corporation, always mindful of this reputation, and of the interests of the town generally, has provided beautiful promenades running north and south of the jetty road, many grass-planted and tree-shaded reserves, and beautiful gardens. Everything possible has been done towards encouraging, and providing for, excursionists and, at the same time, towards providing an area attractive to residents. The effect of the latter is seen in the number of large and tasteful homes, many of them worthy to be called mansions, which adorn the area. The beach is a beautiful one, sandy and gently sloping, and from it bathing, safe for both children and adults, can be enjoyed. Bands and concert parties give performances on the jetty, and for many months of the year both beach and jetty give the appearance of a continuous fair. Sporting facilities include many tennis courts, bowling freens, Glenelg Oval, a golf links, and an enclosed bathing area on the sea front. The shopping centre is of considerable size, electricity and water are both reticulated. Transport to the city is by fast electric tram- acknowledged to be the fastest and best service in Australia. The broad Anzac Highway provides motorists with a fast-travelling highway to Adelaide; omnibus services also use this route. In the later postwar years Glenelg increasingly became a dormitory suburb for Adelaide. Large building allotments and unimproved capital value rating were an incentive for higher-densi
Puente Nuevo, Ronda
Puente Nuevo, Ronda
Ronda is a city in Spanish province of Malaga. It is located about 100 kilometres (62 mi) Northwest from the city of Malaga, within the autonomous community of Andalusia. Its population is aproximately 35,000 inhabitants. History Around the city are remains of prehistoric settlements dating to the Neolithic Age, including the rock paintings of Cueva de la Pileta. Ronda was however first settled by the early Celts, who, in the 6th century BC, called it Arunda. Later Phoenician settlers established themselves nearby to found Acinipo, known locally as Ronda la Vieja, Arunda or Old Ronda. The current Ronda is however of Roman origins, having been founded as a fortified post in the Second Punic War, by Scipio Africanus. Ronda received the title of city at the time of Julius Caesar. In the 5th century AD Ronda was conquered by the Suebi, led by Rechila, being reconquered in the following century by the Eastern Roman Empire, under whose rule Acinipo was abandoned. Later the Visigoth king Leovigild captured the city. Ronda was part of the Visigoth reign until 713, when it fell to the Arabs, who named it Izn-Rand Onda ("city of the castle") and made it the capital of the Takurunna province. After the disintegration of the caliphate of Cordoba, Ronda became the capital of a small kingdom, the taifa of Ronda. During this period Ronda received most of its Islamic architectural heritage. In 1065 Ronda was conquered by the taifa of Seville led by Abbad II al-Mu'tadid. Both the poet Salih ben Sharif al-Rundi (1204–1285) and the Sufi scholar Ibn Abbad al-Rundi (1333–1390) were born in Ronda. The Islamic domination of Ronda ended in 1485, when it was conquered by the Marquis of Cadiz after a brief siege. Subsequently, mostly of the city's old edifices were renewed or adapted to Christian roles, while numerous others were built in newly-created quarters such as the Mercadillo and the San Francisco ones. The Real Maestranza de Caballeria de Ronda was founded in the town in 1572, with military finalities. In the early 19th century, the Napoleonic invasion and the subsequent Peninsular War caused much suffering in Ronda, whose inhabitants reduced from 15,600 to 5,000 in three years. Ronda's area became the base first of guerrilla warriors, then of numerous bandits, whose deeds inspired artists such as Washington Irving, Prosper Merimee and Gustave Dore. In the 19th century the economy of Ronda was mainly rural. In 1918 the city was the seat of the Assembly of Ronda, in which the Andalusian flag, coat of arms and anthem were designed. Ronda was heavily affected by the Spanish Civil War, after which much of the population emigrated elsewhere. Geography Ronda is situated in a very mountainous area about 750 m above mean sea level. The Guadalevin River runs through the city, dividing it in two and carving out the steep, 100 plus meters deep El Tajo canyon upon which the city perches. The Spanish Fir (Abies pinsapo) is endemic to the mountains surrounding Ronda. Main sights Three bridges, Puente Romano ("Roman Bridge", also known as the Puente San Miguel), Puente Viejo ("Old Bridge", also known as the Puente Arabe or "Arab Bridge") and Puente Nuevo ("New Bridge"), span the canyon. The term "nuevo" is a bit of a misnomer, as the building of this bridge commenced in 1751 and took until 1793 to complete. The Puente Nuevo is the tallest of the bridges, towering 120 metres (390 ft) above the canyon floor, and all three serve as some of the city's most impressive features. The ‘Corrida Goyesca’ is a unique and historical bullfight that takes place once a year in Ronda in the Plaza de toros de Ronda, the oldest bullfighting ring in Spain.[2] It was built in 1784 in the Neoclassical style by the architect Jose Martin de Aldehuela, who also designed the Puente Nuevo. The partially intact Banos arabes ("Arab baths") are found below the city and date back to the 13th and 14th centuries. Cultural influence American artists Ernest Hemingway and Orson Welles spent many summers in Ronda as part-time residents of Ronda's old town quarter called La Ciudad. Both wrote about Ronda's beauty and famous bull-fighting traditions. Their collective accounts have contributed to Ronda's popularity over time. Hemingway's novel For Whom the Bell Tolls describes the murder of Nationalist sympathizers early in the Spanish Civil War. The Republicans murder the Nationalists by throwing them from cliffs in an Andalusian village, and Hemingway allegedly based the account on killings that took place in Ronda at the cliffs of El Tajo. Ernest Hemingway wrote many of his novels here as well, such as Fiesta. Orson Welles said he was inspired by his frequent trips to Spain and Ronda (e.g. Welles' unfinished film about Don Quixote). After Welles died in 1985, his ashes were buried in a well, located on the rural property of his friend, the retired bullfighter Antonio Ordonez. In the fashion world Italian

roman shade 35
roman shade 35
35" x 72" Machine Washable Cord-Free Insulated Roman Shade
35" x 72" Machine Washable Cord-Free Insulated Roman Shade. Take the worry out of window treatments. Our kid-safe Cord-Free Insulated Blackout Roman Shades have no cords to tangle. Plus, they're insulated and energy-efficient to save you money. Mounting hardware included. Evenly raise and lower shade without dangerous cords Easy cleaning and allergen reduction with removable fabric panels Exclusive mount design minimizes light gap and maximizes insulation Blackout effect is great for bedrooms Available Colors Chocolate Khaki

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