AWNING WINDOW OPERATORS. WINDOW OPERATORS

Awning Window Operators. Replacement Canopies For Outdoor Swings. Ceiling Light Clip On Lamp Shade.

Awning Window Operators


awning window operators
    window operators
  • (Window operator) In modal logic, the window operator is a modal operator with the following semantic definition: for a Kripke model and . Informally, it says that w "sees" every ?-world (or every ?-world is seen by w). This operator is not definable in the basic modal logic (i.e.
    awning
  • (awned) having awns i.e. bristlelike or hairlike appendages on the flowering parts of some cereals and grasses; "awned wheatgrass"
  • An awning or overhang is a secondary covering attached to the exterior wall of a building. It is typically composed of canvas woven of acrylic, cotton or polyester yarn, or vinyl laminated to polyester fabric that is stretched tightly over a light structure of aluminium, iron or steel, possibly
  • A sheet of canvas or other material stretched on a frame and used to keep the sun or rain off a storefront, window, doorway, or deck
  • a canopy made of canvas to shelter people or things from rain or sun

El Mundo, Former Hamilton Theater
El Mundo, Former Hamilton Theater
Harlem Heights, Manhattan, New York City, New York, United States Constructed in 1912-13 as a vaudeville house during one ofNewYork'stheater building booms, the Hamilton Theater is located in the Hamilton Heights area of Manhattan. Designed by the great theater architect, Thomas W. Lamb, the building is one of his significant pre-World War I theaters in New York City. Lamb also designed the Regent and Hollywood Theaters, both designated New York City landmarks. The Hamilton's developers, B .S. Moss and Solomon Brill, were major builders and operators of vaudeville houses and movie theaters in the New York City area. At the time, vaudeville was the most popular form of theater in the United States. The Hamilton's two neo-Renaissance style facades, facing Broadway and West 146th Street, are dominated by large, round-arched windows with centered oculi. The upper stones feature cast-iron and terra-cotta details including caryatids, brackets, and Corinthian engaged columns. In the 1920s, movies eclipsed vaudeville in popularity; in 1928, the Hamilton was sold to the newly-created Radio-Keith-Orpheum (RKO) Radio Pictures, Inc., which converted it to one of the first movie theaters to show "talking pictures" in New York City. The theater's final screening took place in 1958; afterwards, it was used as a sports arena, a discotheque, and a church. The Hamilton Theater's imposing terra-cotta facade is a reminder of the prominent place held by vaudeville houses and movie theaters in New York City's diverse, early twentieth-century neighborhoods, and is a tribute to its talented architect, Thomas W. Lamb. History and Development of the Neighborhood^ Annexed to New York City in 1873, Harlem developed much of its current residential character during the last quarter of the nineteenth century. With elevated lines serving Second, Third, and Eighth Avenues by 1880, the blocks of central Harlem quickly filled with speculatively-builtrowhouses, such as those found in the Mount Morris Park Historic District. Change, however, came more gradually to the hills overlooking the Hudson River to the west. In the mid-nineteenth century, the area around the Hamilton Theater was known as Carmansville/ Richard F. Carman began purchasing farm land near what is now West 152th Street as early as the mid-1830s. He built a summer residence for himself at Fort Washington in the 1840s and then established a village named after himself to the south. Transportation played a key role in the development of the area, which by the late nineteenth century was called lower Washington Heights." In the late 1880s, a cable street railway was installed on Tenth Avenue between 125"* and 135*" Streets, providing a much-needed transit link to the downtown commercial district. Not only had most streets been paved by this time, but with the support of the Washington Heights Taxpayers Association and other civic-minded groups, the city announced plans to construct an iron viaduct at West 155* Street linking the proposed Central (now Macomb's Dam) Bridge with St. Nicholas Place (the viaduct and the bridge are both designated New York City Landmarks). This ambitious scheme was intended to improve vehicular circulation, connecting the Bronx to Harlem and the Upper West Side. Consequently, real estate interest in lower Washington Heights surged after 1890. By the early 1890s, the area had grown to include hundreds of houses. In addition, a number of churches and institutional buildings had been constructed in and around the village, as well as a hotel, a cemetery, a police station/ The neighborhood also had several industrial buildings located on Tenth Avenue (known as Amsterdam Avenue after 1890), such as the Joseph Loth & Company Ribbon Mill between West 150"* and West 151" Streets/ Broadway, in this area, was then known as the Boulevard, and later as the Boulevard Lafayette. The opening of the Interborough Rapid Transit subway along Broadway in 1904 ignited another round of speculative development. The area attracted a mix of middle to upper middle-class professionals. Census records document doctors, lawyers, merchants, as well as occasional live-in servants of various races and ethnicities. Native-bom whites tended to dominate the population, but there were also immigrants fromlreland, Italy, and Germany. Accompanying the residential construction were buildings for various religious, educational, and cultural institutions, as well as commercial concerns, including theaters featuring popular entertainment. Unlike central Harlem, located east of Hamilton Heights, which was transformed by an influx of African-Americans beginning in the 1910s, the population of Hamilton Heights changed much more gradually. Beginning in the 1920s, the first of several area churches were acquired by African-American congregations, including the Lenox Presbyterian Church, now the St. James Presbyterian Church (409 West 141" Stree
Former Hamilton Theater (El Mundo)
Former Hamilton Theater (El Mundo)
Landmarks Preservation Commission February 8, 2000; Designation List 311 LP- 2052 Constructed in 1912-13 as a vaudeville house during one ofNewYork'stheater building booms, the Hamilton Theater is located in the Hamilton Heights area of Manhattan. Designed by the great theater architect, Thomas W. Lamb, the building is one of his significant pre-World War I theaters in New York City. Lamb also designed the Regent and Hollywood Theaters, both designated New York City landmarks. The Hamilton's developers, B .S. Moss and Solomon Brill, were major builders and operators of vaudeville houses and movie theaters in the New York City area. At the time, vaudeville was the most popular form of theater in the United States. The Hamilton's two neo-Renaissance style facades, facing Broadway and West 146th Street, are dominated by large, round-arched windows with centered oculi. The upper stones feature cast-iron and terra-cotta details including caryatids, brackets, and Corinthian engaged columns. In the 1920s, movies eclipsed vaudeville in popularity; in 1928, the Hamilton was sold to the newly-created Radio-Keith-Orpheum (RKO) Radio Pictures, Inc., which converted it to one of the first movie theaters to show "talking pictures" in New York City. The theater's final screening took place in 1958; afterwards, it was used as a sports arena, a discotheque, and a church. The Hamilton Theater's imposing terra-cotta facade is a reminder of the prominent place held by vaudeville houses and movie theaters in New York City's diverse, early twentieth-century neighborhoods, and is a tribute to its talented architect, Thomas W. Lamb. History and Development of the Neighborhood^ Annexed to New York City in 1873, Harlem developed much of its current residential character during the last quarter of the nineteenth century. With elevated lines serving Second, Third, and Eighth Avenues by 1880, the blocks of central Harlem quickly filled with speculatively-builtrowhouses, such as those found in the Mount Morris Park Historic District. Change, however, came more gradually to the hills overlooking the Hudson River to the west. In the mid-nineteenth century, the area around the Hamilton Theater was known as Carmansville/ Richard F. Carman began purchasing farm land near what is now West 152th Street as early as the mid-1830s. He built a summer residence for himself at Fort Washington in the 1840s and then established a village named after himself to the south. Transportation played a key role in the development of the area, which by the late nineteenth century was called lower Washington Heights." In the late 1880s, a cable street railway was installed on Tenth Avenue between 125"* and 135*" Streets, providing a much-needed transit link to the downtown commercial district. Not only had most streets been paved by this time, but with the support of the Washington Heights Taxpayers Association and other civic-minded groups, the city announced plans to construct an iron viaduct at West 155* Street linking the proposed Central (now Macomb's Dam) Bridge with St. Nicholas Place (the viaduct and the bridge are both designated New York City Landmarks). This ambitious scheme was intended to improve vehicular circulation, connecting the Bronx to Harlem and the Upper West Side. Consequently, real estate interest in lower Washington Heights surged after 1890. By the early 1890s, the area had grown to include hundreds of houses. In addition, a number of churches and institutional buildings had been constructed in and around the village, as well as a hotel, a cemetery, a police station/ The neighborhood also had several industrial buildings located on Tenth Avenue (known as Amsterdam Avenue after 1890), such as the Joseph Loth & Company Ribbon Mill between West 150"* and West 151" Streets/ Broadway, in this area, was then known as the Boulevard, and later as the Boulevard Lafayette. The opening of the Interborough Rapid Transit subway along Broadway in 1904 ignited another round of speculative development. The area attracted a mix of middle to upper middle-class professionals. Census records document doctors, lawyers, merchants, as well as occasional live-in servants of various races and ethnicities. Native-bom whites tended to dominate the population, but there were also immigrants fromlreland, Italy, and Germany. Accompanying the residential construction were buildings for various religious, educational, and cultural institutions, as well as commercial concerns, including theaters featuring popular entertainment. Unlike central Harlem, located east of Hamilton Heights, which was transformed by an influx of African-Americans beginning in the 1910s, the population of Hamilton Heights changed much more gradually. Beginning in the 1920s, the first of several area churches were acquired by African-American congregations, including the Lenox Presbyterian Church, now the St. James Presbyterian Church (409 West

awning window operators
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